no
Search
Filter by Language
In the Write the Phrase you Read section are the following two phrases: 1 - You didn't press the green button. Either of the following translations are accepted but the first is what is shown when you press the answer button Sie haben nicht auf die grüne Taste gedrückt. Sie haben auf die grüne Taste nicht gedrückt 2 - You didn't press the green button but the red button Only the following answer is accepted Sie haben nicht auf die grüne Taste gedrückt, sondern auf die rote Taste. Why isn't the following a valid answer? Sie haben auf die grüne Taste nicht gedrückt, sondern auf die rote Taste.

In the Write the Phrase you Read section are the following two phrases:

1 - You didn't press the green button.

Either of the following translations are accepted but the first is what is shown when you press the answer button

Sie haben nicht auf die grüne Taste gedrückt.
Sie haben auf die grüne Taste nicht gedrückt

2 - You didn't press the green button but the red button

Only the following answer is accepted

Sie haben nicht auf die grüne Taste gedrückt, sondern auf die rote Taste.

Why isn't the following a valid answer?

Sie haben auf die grüne Taste nicht gedrückt, sondern auf die rote Taste.

This question is unsolved
gsandler68
I am having similar problems with word placement, but I think I can help with this example. Words like nicht, auch, gut, and viel are placed at the end of a sentence if they apply to the whole sentence; otherwise they go directly in front of the part of the sentence they apply to. In the first case, "You didn't press the green button." could mean you didn't press anything, or that you pressed something, but not the green button. In the first case you are negating the whole sentence, and so nicht goes at the end. In the second case, you place nicht in front of 'auf die grüne Taste.' But both are acceptable. However, the second sentence ends with 'sondern auf die rote Taste,' so we know you pressed something, just not the green button. Therefore, in this case you don't want to negate the whole first part of the sentence, just 'auf die grüne Taste,' so nicht goes in front of that part of the sentence. Hope this helps.

I am having similar problems with word placement, but I think I can help with this example. Words like nicht, auch, gut, and viel are placed at the end of a sentence if they apply to the whole sentence; otherwise they go directly in front of the part of the sentence they apply to. In the first case, "You didn't press the green button." could mean you didn't press anything, or that you pressed something, but not the green button. In the first case you are negating the whole sentence, and so nicht goes at the end. In the second case, you place nicht in front of 'auf die grüne Taste.' But both are acceptable.
However, the second sentence ends with 'sondern auf die rote Taste,' so we know you pressed something, just not the green button. Therefore, in this case you don't want to negate the whole first part of the sentence, just 'auf die grüne Taste,' so nicht goes in front of that part of the sentence.
Hope this helps.

Post Comment
Regarding German, level 4, session 15: In the "match the phrases" exercise toward the end, the sentence "I know the city by the sea very well" is translated "Ich kenne die Stadt am Meer sehr gut" My question is, if "die Stadt am Meer" is the direct object, shouldn't it go at the end of the sentence? Why is "sehr gut" place at the end instead of before "die Stadt am Meer"? Thanks

Regarding German, level 4, session 15:
In the "match the phrases" exercise toward the end, the sentence "I know the city by the sea very well" is translated "Ich kenne die Stadt am Meer sehr gut" My question is, if "die Stadt am Meer" is the direct object, shouldn't it go at the end of the sentence? Why is "sehr gut" place at the end instead of before "die Stadt am Meer"?

Thanks

This question is unsolved
gsandler68
After completing a few more lessons and watching the tutorial again, I think I understand the placement of adverbs/adjectives like gut, auch, nicht, and viel a bit better. If they apply to the whole sentence, they go at the end. Otherwise, they go directly in front of whatever they apply to. In the example above, 'sehr gut' applies to the whole sentence, particularly to the verb kenne. If 'sehr gut' is placed in front of the direct object 'die Stadt am Meer,' it would imply the city is very good, not my knowledge of the city. This is my understanding; any feedback is appreciated!

After completing a few more lessons and watching the tutorial again, I think I understand the placement of adverbs/adjectives like gut, auch, nicht, and viel a bit better. If they apply to the whole sentence, they go at the end. Otherwise, they go directly in front of whatever they apply to. In the example above, 'sehr gut' applies to the whole sentence, particularly to the verb kenne. If 'sehr gut' is placed in front of the direct object 'die Stadt am Meer,' it would imply the city is very good, not my knowledge of the city.
This is my understanding; any feedback is appreciated!

Post Comment
Do some of the French Upgraded lessons not have a tutorial video or am I missing something. Example: French Upgraded Level 1 Session 10 does not have one for me. I’m using the app on iPhone if that makes a difference. Thanks.

Do some of the French Upgraded lessons not have a tutorial video or am I missing something. Example: French Upgraded Level 1 Session 10 does not have one for me. I’m using the app on iPhone if that makes a difference. Thanks.

View all 6 comments
This question has been solved
mshideler
If you listen to the introduction carefully she tells you that lesson 10 is about practicing what you should already know at this point and will not be getting any new material. Rather, it is just a review of everything learned so far. I think that this occurs around every 10 levels or so.

If you listen to the introduction carefully she tells you that lesson 10 is about practicing what you should already know at this point and will not be getting any new material. Rather, it is just a review of everything learned so far.

I think that this occurs around every 10 levels or so.

Post Comment
I have no idea how to understand the German cases. The way it is explained doesn't make much sense to me. I have taken German in High School and my teacher taught the same way Sonia does and nothing ever clicked. Just when I start understanding why a structure does this and why it is, it is suddenly skewed. My brain almost needs a rule of thumb to follow in order to understand. Does anyone have a way to remember how to tell between the cases that simply made more sense to them?

I have no idea how to understand the German cases. The way it is explained doesn't make much sense to me. I have taken German in High School and my teacher taught the same way Sonia does and nothing ever clicked. Just when I start understanding why a structure does this and why it is, it is suddenly skewed. My brain almost needs a rule of thumb to follow in order to understand. Does anyone have a way to remember how to tell between the cases that simply made more sense to them?

View all 3 comments
This question is unsolved
Emilie Poyet
I agree with Hornsten in the sense that there is no "easy way" to explain and understand the basic uses of the German cases. You have to have quite a good knowledge of grammar, to be able to tell which function each element has in a phrase. Once you get these, it's just a matter of practice -a loooot of practice I know! That said, there are also many situations where you just have to use one case or another and not look for a reason. For example I remember that when first learning about the dative case I made a list of prepositions that always trigger the dative and just learned them by heart: Aus, Bei, Mit, Nach, Seit, Von, Zu. I've repeated the list so much that I still use it as a mnemotechnic device any time I start doubting. I made the same thing with the accusative case, or prepositions that can trigger both cases depending on context etc etc So my advice would be for you to start making your own lists and learn a few of them by heart, it really helps, then you'll see it becomes more and more natural with practice. Mastering the cases is a really long process though, and it is one of the most difficult aspects of the German language, so don't let it put you off, keep at it and don't be afraid of speaking, even if you make a few cases errors sometimes, people will understand!

I agree with Hornsten in the sense that there is no "easy way" to explain and understand the basic uses of the German cases. You have to have quite a good knowledge of grammar, to be able to tell which function each element has in a phrase. Once you get these, it's just a matter of practice -a loooot of practice I know!
That said, there are also many situations where you just have to use one case or another and not look for a reason. For example I remember that when first learning about the dative case I made a list of prepositions that always trigger the dative and just learned them by heart: Aus, Bei, Mit, Nach, Seit, Von, Zu.
I've repeated the list so much that I still use it as a mnemotechnic device any time I start doubting. I made the same thing with the accusative case, or prepositions that can trigger both cases depending on context etc etc
So my advice would be for you to start making your own lists and learn a few of them by heart, it really helps, then you'll see it becomes more and more natural with practice.
Mastering the cases is a really long process though, and it is one of the most difficult aspects of the German language, so don't let it put you off, keep at it and don't be afraid of speaking, even if you make a few cases errors sometimes, people will understand!

jamesckel
It would be easier to answer specific questions because it is a rather large topic you touch upon. Most German grammar books have explanations, and you can easily find explanations online as well. Over simplifying, one can say that the subject of a sentence will be nominative case, the direct object accusative case, and the indirect object the dative case. But which case to use after prepositions, for instance, I find easier to learn through repetition. There is no "rule" to apply that is of much help, or else it's more work to learn when to apply rules than to just memorize. Viel Glück

It would be easier to answer specific questions because it is a rather large topic you touch upon. Most German grammar books have explanations, and you can easily find explanations online as well. Over simplifying, one can say that the subject of a sentence will be nominative case, the direct object accusative case, and the indirect object the dative case. But which case to use after prepositions, for instance, I find easier to learn through repetition. There is no "rule" to apply that is of much help, or else it's more work to learn when to apply rules than to just memorize.

Viel Glück

Post Comment
There are a few flascards that appear to be incorrect on Session 30. Minute = Fēn or Fēnzhong yet, as luck has it, I always guess the wrong one. I was under the impression these where interchangeable. Is there an instance where one is preferred over the other?

There are a few flascards that appear to be incorrect on Session 30.
Minute = Fēn or Fēnzhong
yet, as luck has it, I always guess the wrong one. I was under the impression these where interchangeable. Is there an instance where one is preferred over the other?

This question is unsolved
Post Comment
Hi, team! I recently purchased French 2, and I'm excited to begin improving my French skills. I have mainly been using the iPad app so far, and I have a couple of questions. Firstly, is the app supposed to save my spot when I've exited out in the middle of a session? For instance, I did about a third of the session's exercises, but the next time I opened the app, it said I was 0% through. I just skipped ahead to where I left off, but it seems odd. I also don't see where I can find the flashcards in the app. All I see is the menu where you choose your language, and then it goes right to the lessons. I appreciate any help in advance! Merci, Laura.

Hi, team! I recently purchased French 2, and I'm excited to begin improving my French skills. I have mainly been using the iPad app so far, and I have a couple of questions. Firstly, is the app supposed to save my spot when I've exited out in the middle of a session? For instance, I did about a third of the session's exercises, but the next time I opened the app, it said I was 0% through. I just skipped ahead to where I left off, but it seems odd.
I also don't see where I can find the flashcards in the app. All I see is the menu where you choose your language, and then it goes right to the lessons. I appreciate any help in advance! Merci, Laura.

This question is unsolved
andy@fluenz
Hi Laura, great to hear you're learning French with us! We've been having a bit of an issue with the percentage bar and our engineers are working to correct this now, so apologies for this. As for the flashcards, those are available at flashcards.fluenz.com, but I'm afraid we don't have an App for them yet. They will still work from an iPad, so give that a try. Bonne continuation!

Hi Laura, great to hear you're learning French with us! We've been having a bit of an issue with the percentage bar and our engineers are working to correct this now, so apologies for this. As for the flashcards, those are available at flashcards.fluenz.com, but I'm afraid we don't have an App for them yet. They will still work from an iPad, so give that a try. Bonne continuation!

Post Comment
Hi Fluenz! Your software is top-notch amazing. I was wondering which language is going to be next? Are you guys going to be doing more complex languages like Japanese, Korean, Russian, Hindi, Arabic or any other. Thank you so much.

Hi Fluenz! Your software is top-notch amazing. I was wondering which language is going to be next? Are you guys going to be doing more complex languages like Japanese, Korean, Russian, Hindi, Arabic or any other. Thank you so much.

View all 31 comments
1 person finds this helpful
This question is unsolved
fthola
Hello. This thread has been open for 4 years. Any update on what language(s) you're working on for the near future? Thanks.

Hello. This thread has been open for 4 years. Any update on what language(s) you're working on for the near future? Thanks.

andy@fluenz
Hi there, sorry, no plans at this time for any new languages. We're working hard on our new Spanish Immersion program in Mexico, which has been our major focus this last year. You can see more about it at immersion.fluenz.com

Hi there, sorry, no plans at this time for any new languages. We're working hard on our new Spanish Immersion program in Mexico, which has been our major focus this last year. You can see more about it at immersion.fluenz.com

Post Comment
In the tutorial it was stated that when "wenn" was used in a conjunction that it meant "when" rather than "if". The example in the tutorial was Er fährt nach München, wenn er fertig ist. - He will go to Munich when he is ready But then in the Match the Words section sometimes it is translated as "if". Ich komme euch besuchen, wenn ich kann. - I'll come visit you(i/p) if I can. Ich esse mit dir, wenn es Kuchen gibt. - I'll eat with you if there is cake. And also shown as "when" Er kommt, wenn er fertig ist. - He'll come when he's ready. Are these typographical errors or can "wenn" be used as both "when" or "if" in a conjunction? If it can be both how does one tell which translation to use?

In the tutorial it was stated that when "wenn" was used in a conjunction that it meant "when" rather than "if". The example in the tutorial was

Er fährt nach München, wenn er fertig ist. - He will go to Munich when he is ready

But then in the Match the Words section sometimes it is translated as "if".

Ich komme euch besuchen, wenn ich kann. - I'll come visit you(i/p) if I can.
Ich esse mit dir, wenn es Kuchen gibt. - I'll eat with you if there is cake.

And also shown as "when"

Er kommt, wenn er fertig ist. - He'll come when he's ready.

Are these typographical errors or can "wenn" be used as both "when" or "if" in a conjunction?
If it can be both how does one tell which translation to use?

This question is unsolved
Post Comment
I'm not sure how to ask this question or clarification. I am on level 3 and so far we are using die, das and der for things when we say something like "It is small". If "it" is, for example, something masculine to say "Der ist klein". I am also taking a German class, taught by a native German, and we have been told to say "Er ist klein" using er, sie or es for whatever the gender is of the "thing". I kind of suggested to her how I am learning it in Fluenz and she said that was not correct. Am I misunderstanding something?

I'm not sure how to ask this question or clarification. I am on level 3 and so far we are using die, das and der for things when we say something like "It is small". If "it" is, for example, something masculine to say "Der ist klein". I am also taking a German class, taught by a native German, and we have been told to say "Er ist klein" using er, sie or es for whatever the gender is of the "thing". I kind of suggested to her how I am learning it in Fluenz and she said that was not correct. Am I misunderstanding something?

This question is unsolved
Post Comment
In the conversation, Claudia's line is "Io credo di sì. Quel cinema non é mai pieno." I'm trying to match my pronunciation to the recording. But when I listen, there seems to be an extra syllable that I can't account for. I think it's between non and é, but it goes by so quickly that I can't be sure. Can you help me with this please?

In the conversation, Claudia's line is "Io credo di sì. Quel cinema non é mai pieno." I'm trying to match my pronunciation to the recording. But when I listen, there seems to be an extra syllable that I can't account for. I think it's between non and é, but it goes by so quickly that I can't be sure. Can you help me with this please?

This question is unsolved
Post Comment
Show More Posts
X