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Grammar

I am having a hard time knowing when Ihre means her or their. In one of the workouts you have: Ihre Taschen and Ihre Flüge. The first means her bags and the second means their flights. How do you distinguish the two?

I am having a hard time knowing when Ihre means her or their. In one of the workouts you have:

Ihre Taschen and Ihre Flüge. The first means her bags and the second means their flights. How do you distinguish the two?

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I’m on lesson 1-6 and feel I’m making pretty good progress but I’m wondering how many other people have to really stop and ‘think’ about a sentence when you’re trying to translate? It’s really the definite articles that derail me – especially when they can mean more than one thing such as das. If I’m asked to translate “Where is the hotel? It is there.” I have to close my eyes and really think about it so I can pick the right article. Even though it’s ‘das’, my brain has a hard time accepting the fact that I used the same word for ‘the’ and ‘it’. I know I’m still early in the lessons but I’m a bit worried that if I am constantly having to stop and really think about the right articles I’m going to be useless when it comes to the more advanced lessons or when it comes time to actually hold a conversation. Would love to hear about your experiences early on in the lessons with this?

I’m on lesson 1-6 and feel I’m making pretty good progress but I’m wondering how many other people have to really stop and ‘think’ about a sentence when you’re trying to translate?

It’s really the definite articles that derail me – especially when they can mean more than one thing such as das. If I’m asked to translate “Where is the hotel? It is there.” I have to close my eyes and really think about it so I can pick the right article. Even though it’s ‘das’, my brain has a hard time accepting the fact that I used the same word for ‘the’ and ‘it’.

I know I’m still early in the lessons but I’m a bit worried that if I am constantly having to stop and really think about the right articles I’m going to be useless when it comes to the more advanced lessons or when it comes time to actually hold a conversation.

Would love to hear about your experiences early on in the lessons with this?

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Experiences with German

For those of you who find you're getting overwhelmed with certain parts of the German lessons, I just wanted to give you my recent experience and hope it offers you some hope. A couple months ago I "finished" level 2. But at the end, I was still out in the weeds on a few things, mostly the articles. I was getting a lot of the workouts wrong and couldn't figure out why something that was Der and then was Den is now all of a sudden Dem. It just didn't click and I felt that each session was making more clear my ignorance. When I finished level 1, I had a great sense of accomplishment and felt I really understood the material, but not at the end of 2. The holidays were starting to pick up at this time and my free time was becoming less and less. So for about a month, I put it all down. Then I went through all the review sessions in level 1 until I found anything that threw me off. If it did, I rolled back into those sessions until I figured it out and then continued through the reviews. By the time I got to the first review in level 2, I could see that I had to start that level all over. So starting from session 1, I have progressed up to my current session (14). I changed things up. I complete no more than 4 sessions a week and many times only do 3. When I do a new session, I don't progress until I do it twice and am confident that I get all the material. I may repeat one session 3-4 times over a couple days, but I refuse to rush it. I generally take weekends off and absorb what I have learned throughout the week. You know what? It is like a whole different world. I really have grasped a lot of the grammar that bewildered me before. I feel like this is actually starting to really sink in. When I watch German TV, I feel like I am understanding about 25-30% of what they are saying, where I absolutely did not before. BTW, I recommend the Heute app. You can get it on the Amazon fire stick for free. It shows you daily news reports from Germany. So if you feel like you are just not getting it, stop. Back up until you find where it all went wrong and start from there. You won't regret it!

For those of you who find you're getting overwhelmed with certain parts of the German lessons, I just wanted to give you my recent experience and hope it offers you some hope.

A couple months ago I "finished" level 2. But at the end, I was still out in the weeds on a few things, mostly the articles. I was getting a lot of the workouts wrong and couldn't figure out why something that was Der and then was Den is now all of a sudden Dem. It just didn't click and I felt that each session was making more clear my ignorance. When I finished level 1, I had a great sense of accomplishment and felt I really understood the material, but not at the end of 2.

The holidays were starting to pick up at this time and my free time was becoming less and less. So for about a month, I put it all down. Then I went through all the review sessions in level 1 until I found anything that threw me off. If it did, I rolled back into those sessions until I figured it out and then continued through the reviews. By the time I got to the first review in level 2, I could see that I had to start that level all over. So starting from session 1, I have progressed up to my current session (14).

I changed things up. I complete no more than 4 sessions a week and many times only do 3. When I do a new session, I don't progress until I do it twice and am confident that I get all the material. I may repeat one session 3-4 times over a couple days, but I refuse to rush it. I generally take weekends off and absorb what I have learned throughout the week. You know what? It is like a whole different world.

I really have grasped a lot of the grammar that bewildered me before. I feel like this is actually starting to really sink in. When I watch German TV, I feel like I am understanding about 25-30% of what they are saying, where I absolutely did not before. BTW, I recommend the Heute app. You can get it on the Amazon fire stick for free. It shows you daily news reports from Germany.

So if you feel like you are just not getting it, stop. Back up until you find where it all went wrong and start from there. You won't regret it!

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We recently attended a week of Mercedes Benz events in Stuttgart. My attempt to speak German at the hotel and hotel restaurant were met with quizzical looks and then I would transition to English. At this point I felt depressed that years of study had been a failure. I understood them but they didn't understand me. At dinner one evening I was seated next to a MB employee. His proximity and knowing he would bail me out if needed, I successfully ordered in German and was emboldened to make conversation in German with him. I told him I was amazed at my success with German after miserably failing at the hotel and a couple of restaurants. He replied that the reason was simple. People working in the hospitality industry in Germany are frequently immigrants from Turkey and Greece who have good English language skills but poor German language skills. Suddenly my confidence was restored. I would speak German every chance I got, knowing that if I was not understood, it was not because of my inept German skills, but perhaps theirs. My motivation to continue learning German was restored.

We recently attended a week of Mercedes Benz events in Stuttgart. My attempt to speak German at the hotel and hotel restaurant were met with quizzical looks and then I would transition to English. At this point I felt depressed that years of study had been a failure. I understood them but they didn't understand me. At dinner one evening I was seated next to a MB employee. His proximity and knowing he would bail me out if needed, I successfully ordered in German and was emboldened to make conversation in German with him. I told him I was amazed at my success with German after miserably failing at the hotel and a couple of restaurants. He replied that the reason was simple. People working in the hospitality industry in Germany are frequently immigrants from Turkey and Greece who have good English language skills but poor German language skills. Suddenly my confidence was restored. I would speak German every chance I got, knowing that if I was not understood, it was not because of my inept German skills, but perhaps theirs. My motivation to continue learning German was restored.

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Travel + Culture

I am preparing for a trip to Salzburg in a few weeks, and I am really enjoying learning German with Fluenz. I am surprised that I am not learning more food terms. For as many times I have practiced asking for a menu, I haven't learned what any of the dishes will mean. I am almost done with German 2. Will food vocabulary be offered in later sessions?

I am preparing for a trip to Salzburg in a few weeks, and I am really enjoying learning German with Fluenz. I am surprised that I am not learning more food terms. For as many times I have practiced asking for a menu, I haven't learned what any of the dishes will mean. I am almost done with German 2. Will food vocabulary be offered in later sessions?

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I have heard that when someone enters a restaurant in Germany, the main prerogative is to just go find a table yourself. Nonetheless, the program teaches that you meet a waiter and they assign you to a table. I am wondering which is correct just so i know for myself and dont come off dumb.

I have heard that when someone enters a restaurant in Germany, the main prerogative is to just go find a table yourself. Nonetheless, the program teaches that you meet a waiter and they assign you to a table. I am wondering which is correct just so i know for myself and dont come off dumb.

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Session by Session

There is a small error here: https://online.fluenz.com/#drill/N/5 The phrase is: "Diese zwölf Personen sind letzte Woche zum Treffen gekommen" The translation when you click on it is: "This twelve people came to the meeting last week" I believe that is supposed to be "These twelve" at least if it is supposed to be grammatically correct.

There is a small error here:

https://online.fluenz.com/#drill/N/5

The phrase is:

"Diese zwölf Personen sind letzte Woche zum Treffen gekommen"

The translation when you click on it is:

"This twelve people came to the meeting last week"

I believe that is supposed to be "These twelve" at least if it is supposed to be grammatically correct.

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I am at German Level 2 Session 8. During the last few sessions I have noticed that the German speakers sometimes don't pronounce the -en at the end of some words. In particular this has come up with the words Ihnen, Personen, and einen. This seems to only happen in certain contexts. When I practice speaking I always pronounce these out so that the -en is still heard. Is this pronunciation important? Should I drop the -en sounds when I don't hear it pronounced in the listening exercises? This has brought a little confusion so wanted to ask and clarify. Thanks.

I am at German Level 2 Session 8. During the last few sessions I have noticed that the German speakers sometimes don't pronounce the -en at the end of some words. In particular this has come up with the words Ihnen, Personen, and einen. This seems to only happen in certain contexts. When I practice speaking I always pronounce these out so that the -en is still heard. Is this pronunciation important? Should I drop the -en sounds when I don't hear it pronounced in the listening exercises? This has brought a little confusion so wanted to ask and clarify. Thanks.

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