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zac.hilliker

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If you are still in the beginning stages of learning Spanish, you will probably want to skip reading this post, because it will likely really confuse you as you go through the program. I started listening to a lot of Latin music when I began my Spanish journey, and even though I've been using common phrases that use the reflexive form, I've been wondering ever since....what is the difference between ir and its reflexive form, irse, because irse is used a lot in music! One example is Nacho's song "No Te Vas." "De aquí no te vas sin mí, de aquí no me voy sin ti." Well, I finally took some time to look it up, and I now have a clearer idea of a lot of songs I've been listening to thanks to knowing the subtle differences of ir, irse, and salir. Here's the link to the article that gives some explanation. It also made me aware that there are times when salir is more appropriate than irse, or vice versa. https://www.realfastspanish.com/vocabulary/ir-vs-irse

If you are still in the beginning stages of learning Spanish, you will probably want to skip reading this post, because it will likely really confuse you as you go through the program.

I started listening to a lot of Latin music when I began my Spanish journey, and even though I've been using common phrases that use the reflexive form, I've been wondering ever since....what is the difference between ir and its reflexive form, irse, because irse is used a lot in music!

One example is Nacho's song "No Te Vas."
"De aquí no te vas sin mí,
de aquí no me voy sin ti."

Well, I finally took some time to look it up, and I now have a clearer idea of a lot of songs I've been listening to thanks to knowing the subtle differences of ir, irse, and salir. Here's the link to the article that gives some explanation. It also made me aware that there are times when salir is more appropriate than irse, or vice versa.

https://www.realfastspanish.com/vocabulary/ir-vs-irse

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I finished all 5 levels of Fluenz a few months ago now, and I just wanted to give some feedback and suggestions. Maybe other users can give their two cents as well, whether you've completed the program or not! This is by far the most smooth and natural program I've come across. From the $10 generic "Learn X Language" you can find in your local computer store to Fluenz's competitors, I didn't know learning a new language could be so easy (even when it's hard) until I discovered Fluenz after researching Language-learning software for work. I have been and will continue to recommend Fluenz to anyone I know that wants to learn a new language. In my opinion, Fluenz is a perfect balance between too much information or analysis of a language and not enough. I loved it so much that I finished all 5 levels in less than 6 months! And that's with one-week breaks here and there! I've come to trust Fluenz so much that I don't really know where to go with my Spanish journey from here! I already have a digital pen pal that I write to in Spanish pretty much every day. Sometimes they have to tell me to try again when I don't get it right, but overall they are very impressed with how far I've come. Recommendations/requests! - The Flashcards are an awesome way to practice. I can't even tell you how many times I've done the flashcards of every lesson, every level, especially since I completed the program. The "Write the Phrases You Hear" workouts of the lessons are, in my opinion, where I was most engaged. It requires you to listen while also realizing how the words and grammar you just learned are used. It would be so amazing if there was also a separate tool, like the Flashcards, that is only for writing what you hear. Even if it only included the phrases that are already recorded and used in the lessons, having this separate resource is a great way to work on listening outside of the lessons. I just started going into the lessons and only doing the listening workouts, but it would be very convenient and useful to be able to access "Listening Flashcards" on their own. Please, please! - Curriculum. Like I said, I trust Fluenz with my Spanish, but after finishing 5 levels, I really felt like there was no finality or any direction given as to what I should do next! If Fluenz is a path to Fluency, help a brother out! It would be great to see a "curriculum," some sort of diagram, or SOMETHING that says, here is everything you can learn in Spanish, and here is what you learned/will learn with Fluenz. I don't mean individual words or phrases. For example, I only know the subjunctive exists because of comments I've seen here in the Commons. I would have just been confused every time I saw verbs in the subjunctive. I see people suggesting that it's not used as much, but that hasn't been my experience with my pen pals. We also never covered what we would call "imperative sentences" in English. Not "Can I have your number?" but "Give me your number!" ;-) I can go combing through hundreds of language-learning resources that exist out there and start figuring out what I already know, but I would feel so much more confident if Fluenz provided me with what I've been taught and what I still need to learn. Recommendations for other resources would be awesome, too. If you're not going to teach me everything in 5 levels, at least tell me a good place to learn more. - Advanced Supplement. This kind of goes with my prior point. I would definitely pay for an advanced Spanish supplement to the program. I know recording and organizing the lessons takes a lot of time and effort, but I don't think at the higher levels we really need all of that in order to build onto what we already know. Even if it only included subject matter, explanations, and a few examples and practice workouts, I would be very happy! - Speaking and Listening. I think it is understood when using a computer program to learn a language that you will have to look elsewhere to get the speaking and listening experience needed to become fluent. I know it's a complicated and cumbersome task, but having the option to talk with someone live would really take Fluenz to the next level. The immersion program is a great way to get that experience, but for those that don't have the time and/or money to participate, it would be great to get feedback and direction from a company you trust. - If I have to give one criticism of the program, it would be with the way questions are translated. It is very common and casual in English to structure questions the same way that they are in Spanish; that is, the same structure as a statement but with intonation distinguishing it as either a question or statement. This isn't always the case, of course, but sometimes it was more odd to change the structure than to just keep it in line with the Spanish. This was especially clear in the very strange translations for "tampoco." You will never hear someone say in English "Don't you want to go either?" Instead, it would the somewhat rhetorical question, "You don't want to go either?" I think that "tampoco" can be explained better in order to avoid this type of strange translation. It seems unnecessarily complicated when the English translation can usually very easily match up to the Spanish. I'm determined to become Fluent in Spanish, and I hope I can continue with Fluenz in some way!

I finished all 5 levels of Fluenz a few months ago now, and I just wanted to give some feedback and suggestions. Maybe other users can give their two cents as well, whether you've completed the program or not!

This is by far the most smooth and natural program I've come across. From the $10 generic "Learn X Language" you can find in your local computer store to Fluenz's competitors, I didn't know learning a new language could be so easy (even when it's hard) until I discovered Fluenz after researching Language-learning software for work. I have been and will continue to recommend Fluenz to anyone I know that wants to learn a new language. In my opinion, Fluenz is a perfect balance between too much information or analysis of a language and not enough. I loved it so much that I finished all 5 levels in less than 6 months! And that's with one-week breaks here and there! I've come to trust Fluenz so much that I don't really know where to go with my Spanish journey from here! I already have a digital pen pal that I write to in Spanish pretty much every day. Sometimes they have to tell me to try again when I don't get it right, but overall they are very impressed with how far I've come.

Recommendations/requests!
- The Flashcards are an awesome way to practice. I can't even tell you how many times I've done the flashcards of every lesson, every level, especially since I completed the program. The "Write the Phrases You Hear" workouts of the lessons are, in my opinion, where I was most engaged. It requires you to listen while also realizing how the words and grammar you just learned are used. It would be so amazing if there was also a separate tool, like the Flashcards, that is only for writing what you hear. Even if it only included the phrases that are already recorded and used in the lessons, having this separate resource is a great way to work on listening outside of the lessons. I just started going into the lessons and only doing the listening workouts, but it would be very convenient and useful to be able to access "Listening Flashcards" on their own. Please, please!
- Curriculum. Like I said, I trust Fluenz with my Spanish, but after finishing 5 levels, I really felt like there was no finality or any direction given as to what I should do next! If Fluenz is a path to Fluency, help a brother out! It would be great to see a "curriculum," some sort of diagram, or SOMETHING that says, here is everything you can learn in Spanish, and here is what you learned/will learn with Fluenz. I don't mean individual words or phrases. For example, I only know the subjunctive exists because of comments I've seen here in the Commons. I would have just been confused every time I saw verbs in the subjunctive. I see people suggesting that it's not used as much, but that hasn't been my experience with my pen pals. We also never covered what we would call "imperative sentences" in English. Not "Can I have your number?" but "Give me your number!" ;-) I can go combing through hundreds of language-learning resources that exist out there and start figuring out what I already know, but I would feel so much more confident if Fluenz provided me with what I've been taught and what I still need to learn. Recommendations for other resources would be awesome, too. If you're not going to teach me everything in 5 levels, at least tell me a good place to learn more.
- Advanced Supplement. This kind of goes with my prior point. I would definitely pay for an advanced Spanish supplement to the program. I know recording and organizing the lessons takes a lot of time and effort, but I don't think at the higher levels we really need all of that in order to build onto what we already know. Even if it only included subject matter, explanations, and a few examples and practice workouts, I would be very happy!
- Speaking and Listening. I think it is understood when using a computer program to learn a language that you will have to look elsewhere to get the speaking and listening experience needed to become fluent. I know it's a complicated and cumbersome task, but having the option to talk with someone live would really take Fluenz to the next level. The immersion program is a great way to get that experience, but for those that don't have the time and/or money to participate, it would be great to get feedback and direction from a company you trust.
- If I have to give one criticism of the program, it would be with the way questions are translated. It is very common and casual in English to structure questions the same way that they are in Spanish; that is, the same structure as a statement but with intonation distinguishing it as either a question or statement. This isn't always the case, of course, but sometimes it was more odd to change the structure than to just keep it in line with the Spanish. This was especially clear in the very strange translations for "tampoco." You will never hear someone say in English "Don't you want to go either?" Instead, it would the somewhat rhetorical question, "You don't want to go either?" I think that "tampoco" can be explained better in order to avoid this type of strange translation. It seems unnecessarily complicated when the English translation can usually very easily match up to the Spanish.

I'm determined to become Fluent in Spanish, and I hope I can continue with Fluenz in some way!

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zac.hilliker
I don't answer anyone in the commons unless I am confident in the answer, and I always make sure to research the topic a little more before answering, so I have learned more from it, in a sense. There are definitely good responses, but there are occasions when other users offer their two cents, and frankly, it's nonsense, more confusing than helpful, or only partly true. The person who posted then has to read all the answers and figure out on their own what is useful or what makes sense, and they may end up more confused in the end. An expert in the language, from Fluenz, should be chiming in with "Fabrice is right" or "Here's a more thorough explanation" or something to provide fidelity in the validity of the answer given. Like I said, it's easier than checking your email, and you shouldn't be going it alone, Andy. It should be too easy for one expert from each language to respond to questions in the commons once or twice a week.

I don't answer anyone in the commons unless I am confident in the answer, and I always make sure to research the topic a little more before answering, so I have learned more from it, in a sense. There are definitely good responses, but there are occasions when other users offer their two cents, and frankly, it's nonsense, more confusing than helpful, or only partly true. The person who posted then has to read all the answers and figure out on their own what is useful or what makes sense, and they may end up more confused in the end. An expert in the language, from Fluenz, should be chiming in with "Fabrice is right" or "Here's a more thorough explanation" or something to provide fidelity in the validity of the answer given. Like I said, it's easier than checking your email, and you shouldn't be going it alone, Andy. It should be too easy for one expert from each language to respond to questions in the commons once or twice a week.

toltec
I found this true with Spanish. The main problem was in writing the phrase you see or hear. At times after I make the corrections, it still doesn't accept it. I go back a step and redo it or go back and hit the answer without typing it and I move on.

I found this true with Spanish. The main problem was in writing the phrase you see or hear. At times after I make the corrections, it still doesn't accept it. I go back a step and redo it or go back and hit the answer without typing it and I move on.

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Spanish Upgraded, Level 2, Session 8 We've been using estar for location, except in cases like "Es alla" or "Si, es aqui" when identifying a place. However, in this session something changed, and I'm not sure why. "Where is the office?" is translated as "Donde esta la oficina?" but "Where is the meeting?" is translated as "Donde es la reunion?" followed by various phrases giving the location of the reunion. I would understand using ser to describe the identity of the meeting, such as "La reunion es en ese edificio" because that may never change, but once we start describing the location of the meeting using directions, why do we not use estar?

Spanish Upgraded, Level 2, Session 8

We've been using estar for location, except in cases like "Es alla" or "Si, es aqui" when identifying a place. However, in this session something changed, and I'm not sure why.

"Where is the office?" is translated as "Donde esta la oficina?" but "Where is the meeting?" is translated as "Donde es la reunion?" followed by various phrases giving the location of the reunion. I would understand using ser to describe the identity of the meeting, such as "La reunion es en ese edificio" because that may never change, but once we start describing the location of the meeting using directions, why do we not use estar?

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zac.hilliker
Ashoka, that information does not make much sense, and "Estar" is the word, not "esta."

Ashoka, that information does not make much sense, and "Estar" is the word, not "esta."

Memalor
The general rule is to use estar for location. However, when you are talking about where an event takes place, you use ser. This is an exception to the general rule, and you just have to memorize it.

The general rule is to use estar for location. However, when you are talking about where an event takes place, you use ser. This is an exception to the general rule, and you just have to memorize it.

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