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tommyzDad

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VA
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The sentences throwing off my understanding are: 1) There is a very beautiful plaza next to the hotel. In the lesson, it's "Il y a une place tres belle a cote de l'hotel." Would it be correct to also structure it as "Il y une tres belle place a cote de l'hotel"? 2) We went (there) for work: In the lesson it's "Nous y sommes alles pour le travail.". Would I be correct in saying it this way as well: "Nous sommes y alles pour le travail"?

The sentences throwing off my understanding are:
1) There is a very beautiful plaza next to the hotel. In the lesson, it's "Il y a une place tres belle a cote de l'hotel." Would it be correct to also structure it as "Il y une tres belle place a cote de l'hotel"?

2) We went (there) for work: In the lesson it's "Nous y sommes alles pour le travail.". Would I be correct in saying it this way as well: "Nous sommes y alles pour le travail"?

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Emilie Poyet
Hi tommyzDad, good questions! The placement of adjectives and adverbs is a bit tricky in French, especially since they don't all work the same so we can't just give a simple rule. So here you go: 1) As we said in the tutorials, BAGS adjectives usually go before the noun they describe, yet when they're accompanied by an adverb like "très" or " un peu" for example, it's fine to place them after as well. In general you'll notice that long adjectives tend to go after the noun, but we'll work on it little by little. So the answer is yes, in this case they can either go before or after, both are correct and we've made sure the program accepts both options. *If you wonder, the difference is subtle, placing them after might lay a bit more emphasis onto them that's all 2) The adverb "Y" always goes right before the verb it describes, as in: Nous Y allons pour le travail. So when there are 2 verbs in a phrase it usually goes in-between because it describes the second one, as in: Nous allons Y aller pour le travail. Nous devons Y aller pour le travail (or voulons, pouvons etc) However pay attention in the passé composé there aren't exactly two "verbs", the conjugation is a compound, so être (or avoir) are what we call "auxiliaries", they're part of the verb conjugation in this case, which is why in the passé composé Y always goes before the auxiliary, as in: Nous Y sommes allés pour le travail. Other examples: Nous y avons voyagé en 2012. J'y ai mangé hier. Il y est allé ce matin... Unlike the placement of adjectives, which can be quite complex and has to be practiced until advanced studies, the place of Y is not flexible, so keep these little rules in mind and you'll be fine!

Hi tommyzDad, good questions! The placement of adjectives and adverbs is a bit tricky in French, especially since they don't all work the same so we can't just give a simple rule. So here you go:

1) As we said in the tutorials, BAGS adjectives usually go before the noun they describe, yet when they're accompanied by an adverb like "très" or " un peu" for example, it's fine to place them after as well. In general you'll notice that long adjectives tend to go after the noun, but we'll work on it little by little. So the answer is yes, in this case they can either go before or after, both are correct and we've made sure the program accepts both options.
*If you wonder, the difference is subtle, placing them after might lay a bit more emphasis onto them that's all

2) The adverb "Y" always goes right before the verb it describes, as in:
Nous Y allons pour le travail.
So when there are 2 verbs in a phrase it usually goes in-between because it describes the second one, as in:
Nous allons Y aller pour le travail.
Nous devons Y aller pour le travail (or voulons, pouvons etc)
However pay attention in the passé composé there aren't exactly two "verbs", the conjugation is a compound, so être (or avoir) are what we call "auxiliaries", they're part of the verb conjugation in this case, which is why in the passé composé Y always goes before the auxiliary, as in:
Nous Y sommes allés pour le travail.
Other examples:
Nous y avons voyagé en 2012.
J'y ai mangé hier.
Il y est allé ce matin...

Unlike the placement of adjectives, which can be quite complex and has to be practiced until advanced studies, the place of Y is not flexible, so keep these little rules in mind and you'll be fine!

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I don't recall if it's in Session 9 or 10 of French Level 2, but in the Flashcards the sentence is "They went to the stadium to see the soccer game." From one of the previous Sessions (I wish I could remember which one) I recalled "pour" being used with the verb, so, I used "Ils sont alles au stade pour voir le match de football." While I do get the sentence "correct", i.e. green text, the confirmation sentence reads "Ils sont alles au stade voir le match de football." Are both correct in spoken French?

I don't recall if it's in Session 9 or 10 of French Level 2, but in the Flashcards the sentence is "They went to the stadium to see the soccer game." From one of the previous Sessions (I wish I could remember which one) I recalled "pour" being used with the verb, so, I used "Ils sont alles au stade pour voir le match de football."

While I do get the sentence "correct", i.e. green text, the confirmation sentence reads "Ils sont alles au stade voir le match de football." Are both correct in spoken French?

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Fabrice
You can say "Elle a été ici parler avec vous“, but it sounds a bit weird, so maybe there is a grammatical rule that i'm not aware of.

You can say "Elle a été ici parler avec vous“, but it sounds a bit weird, so maybe there is a grammatical rule that i'm not aware of.

James Putney
I think in Fabrice's last example, it would definitely require "pour" because purpose is clearly implied. The ambiguity comes with "aller" which often has an implied "to." This is especially true when used to imply the future, for example, I am going to do it, "Je vais le faire." Also, "I went to see a movie" probably "Je suis alle voir un film" but "I went to Paris to see a movie" probably "Je suis alle a Paris pour voir un film." i.e., seeing the film was the purpose of going to Paris.

I think in Fabrice's last example, it would definitely require "pour" because purpose is clearly implied. The ambiguity comes with "aller" which often has an implied "to." This is especially true when used to imply the future, for example, I am going to do it, "Je vais le faire." Also, "I went to see a movie" probably "Je suis alle voir un film" but "I went to Paris to see a movie" probably "Je suis alle a Paris pour voir un film." i.e., seeing the film was the purpose of going to Paris.

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Match the Phrase: One phrase is "Yesterday, we went to see her new house." "Hier, nous sommes alles VOIR sa vouvelle maison." But for the phrase, "He went to Canada to see his family," it's "Il est alle au Canada POUR VOIR sa famille." Why the difference? Voir is "to see" correct? "Nous sommes alles VOIR" = "We went TO SEE". Then shouldn't the second phrase be structured similarly? "Il est alle au Canada pour VOIR" in my mind means "He went to Canada to TO SEE..."

Match the Phrase: One phrase is "Yesterday, we went to see her new house." "Hier, nous sommes alles VOIR sa vouvelle maison." But for the phrase, "He went to Canada to see his family," it's "Il est alle au Canada POUR VOIR sa famille."

Why the difference? Voir is "to see" correct?

"Nous sommes alles VOIR" = "We went TO SEE".

Then shouldn't the second phrase be structured similarly?

"Il est alle au Canada pour VOIR" in my mind means "He went to Canada to TO SEE..."

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tommyzDad
I think I see it now: In the first instance, it is literally "...we went to see ...."; in the second, it's "He went to Canada to [for the purpose of seeing] see his family. Correct?

I think I see it now: In the first instance, it is literally "...we went to see ...."; in the second, it's "He went to Canada to [for the purpose of seeing] see his family. Correct?

FluenzLab
That's spot on! What we are really saying in this sentence is: He went to Canada (for the purpose of or in order) to see his family. Great explanation, thank you James.

That's spot on! What we are really saying in this sentence is: He went to Canada (for the purpose of or in order) to see his family. Great explanation, thank you James.

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French 1, Session 19. Once again, another verb has been introduced (acheter, to buy), but there is no explanation / breakdown of pronunciation of it by Sonia.

French 1, Session 19.
Once again, another verb has been introduced (acheter, to buy), but there is no explanation / breakdown of pronunciation of it by Sonia.

Eric T.
Although Sonia doesn't explain it, there is a native speaker who pronounces the word in the first exercise. She says it slowly and you can hit the button to hear it over and over. It's a little like AH - SH - TAY. You will sometimes hear it pronounced fully with three syllables, and other times hear it as two syllables when it is spoken quickly.

Although Sonia doesn't explain it, there is a native speaker who pronounces the word in the first exercise. She says it slowly and you can hit the button to hear it over and over. It's a little like AH - SH - TAY. You will sometimes hear it pronounced fully with three syllables, and other times hear it as two syllables when it is spoken quickly.

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Just a heads-up: French 1, Session 17, at the end of the conversation the sales lady says only "Desolee"; she does not say "Il n'y a pas". But when Sonia breaks down the conversation, it's mentioned.

Just a heads-up: French 1, Session 17, at the end of the conversation the sales lady says only "Desolee"; she does not say "Il n'y a pas". But when Sonia breaks down the conversation, it's mentioned.

andy@fluenz
Thanks for reporting!

Thanks for reporting!

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In the example dialogue, the text reads "Je veux aller à cette adresse", but I really think she's saying "Je vais aller à cette adresse". Is anyone else hearing that as well?

In the example dialogue, the text reads "Je veux aller à cette adresse", but I really think she's saying "Je vais aller à cette adresse". Is anyone else hearing that as well?

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Eric T.
@ tommyzDad - You're welcome. I'm sure you are doing fine at this stage. Trust me, one day in the not too distant future if you decide to go back and listen, you'll definitely hear 'veux'.

@ tommyzDad - You're welcome. I'm sure you are doing fine at this stage. Trust me, one day in the not too distant future if you decide to go back and listen, you'll definitely hear 'veux'.

Lancent
I listened several times: sounds like "vais".

I listened several times: sounds like "vais".

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Are "à" and "dans" interchangeable? In Lesson 06 I learned that "à" is "at", e.g. "Elle est à l'hôtel". And then in a later in French 1 Podcast 04, "dans" is used, e.g. "Elle va rester dans cet l'hôtel". But there was no explanation as to why the "dans" was used instead of "à". Are both completely interchangeable when one wants to say "at"?

Are "à" and "dans" interchangeable?
In Lesson 06 I learned that "à" is "at", e.g. "Elle est à l'hôtel". And then in a later in French 1 Podcast 04, "dans" is used, e.g. "Elle va rester dans cet l'hôtel". But there was no explanation as to why the "dans" was used instead of "à". Are both completely interchangeable when one wants to say "at"?

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Mike W
à in this context is generally translated to English as "at", as you recognize. Dans in this context is translated to English as "in" So in English the two phrases translate as She is at the hotel and She is going to stay in that hotel.

à in this context is generally translated to English as "at", as you recognize. Dans in this context is translated to English as "in" So in English the two phrases translate as She is at the hotel and She is going to stay in that hotel.

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Salut, les gars! I'm curious to know how the Flashcards "know" I've answered incorrectly. I just completed the cards for Session 3, and among the ones I answered incorrectly were questions which did not require typing. I did click the down arrow, to reveal the answer, for a few of them, so that may account for some of the "wrong" answers, but the rest I responded to verbally, then clicked the right-arrow.

Salut, les gars!

I'm curious to know how the Flashcards "know" I've answered incorrectly. I just completed the cards for Session 3, and among the ones I answered incorrectly were questions which did not require typing. I did click the down arrow, to reveal the answer, for a few of them, so that may account for some of the "wrong" answers, but the rest I responded to verbally, then clicked the right-arrow.

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