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srfr

Posts: 0
Midlothian, VA
United States
Je viens de finir tous les cinq niveaux de Fluenz French. J'ai commence le programme quelques fois mais je ne l'ai jamais fait a la fin avant. My keyboard doesn't allow for accent marks, so I'm switching to English so you won't think I don't know how to spell properly. :-) I've had the program for years and have tried to get through it all a few times, but I never made it past half-way through Level 3. This time I started over with Level 1 in January and committed to doing one level per month. Today, June 12, I finished Level 5! I'm so happy, and I truly appreciate Fluenz - and especially Caroline, who did a wonderful job in the tutorials. I wish you could see the stack of flash cards I made while watching her tutorials. It's 8 inches high! I'll use them over and over to reinforce my learning. Now I know I must do as she says and find other ways to keep advancing my knowledge of French. Movies, a language buddy, Internet news, trips to France and/or Canada? All of the above? Thank you, Fluenz! Thank you, Caroline!!!

Je viens de finir tous les cinq niveaux de Fluenz French. J'ai commence le programme quelques fois mais je ne l'ai jamais fait a la fin avant. My keyboard doesn't allow for accent marks, so I'm switching to English so you won't think I don't know how to spell properly. :-) I've had the program for years and have tried to get through it all a few times, but I never made it past half-way through Level 3. This time I started over with Level 1 in January and committed to doing one level per month. Today, June 12, I finished Level 5! I'm so happy, and I truly appreciate Fluenz - and especially Caroline, who did a wonderful job in the tutorials. I wish you could see the stack of flash cards I made while watching her tutorials. It's 8 inches high! I'll use them over and over to reinforce my learning. Now I know I must do as she says and find other ways to keep advancing my knowledge of French. Movies, a language buddy, Internet news, trips to France and/or Canada? All of the above? Thank you, Fluenz! Thank you, Caroline!!!

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andy@fluenz
Take a few days off from new lessons and try reviewing other lessons via the flashcards at flashcards.fluenz.com for a bit before moving on. When you start again, be sure to take written notes during the tutorial videos so you can have those to look back on. Handwritten tend to be best. Hope this helps!

Take a few days off from new lessons and try reviewing other lessons via the flashcards at flashcards.fluenz.com for a bit before moving on. When you start again, be sure to take written notes during the tutorial videos so you can have those to look back on. Handwritten tend to be best. Hope this helps!

Emilie Poyet
This session is full of expressions and specific structures, so I think an option would be to leave it out for now and do the next sessions (when you feel ready) until session 16, which is a review of the first half. Then go back to session 13, or even better: revisit the first half of level 4 completely: listen to the conversations and tutorials, and do the flashcards instead of the drills this time.. Since level 4 is quite dense, doing this before moving to the second half can help you make sure you really integrate the material and move forward more confidently into the level. Keep it up!

This session is full of expressions and specific structures, so I think an option would be to leave it out for now and do the next sessions (when you feel ready) until session 16, which is a review of the first half. Then go back to session 13, or even better: revisit the first half of level 4 completely: listen to the conversations and tutorials, and do the flashcards instead of the drills this time.. Since level 4 is quite dense, doing this before moving to the second half can help you make sure you really integrate the material and move forward more confidently into the level. Keep it up!

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A lot of the answers (i.e., when you drag the French sentence over to the English translation) in the first "Match the Words" in French 5, Session 15, are mixed up. To proceed, you have to just try each possibility.

A lot of the answers (i.e., when you drag the French sentence over to the English translation) in the first "Match the Words" in French 5, Session 15, are mixed up. To proceed, you have to just try each possibility.

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FluenzFrenchUser
I just noticed this today myself and was going to report it but I saw this post. it has not been fixed yet.

I just noticed this today myself and was going to report it but I saw this post. it has not been fixed yet.

Emilie Poyet
We sincerely apologize for the delay on this one, our tech team is on it and it should be out very soon. Sorry and thanks again for all your feedback and patience.

We sincerely apologize for the delay on this one, our tech team is on it and it should be out very soon. Sorry and thanks again for all your feedback and patience.

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I've noticed in the conversations that the speakers will sometimes add an extra syllable, fairly softly/slightly and pronounced sort of like 'ah', at the end of a phrase or sentence. This is very apparent in Isabella's lines in French 4, Session 20, where she adds an 'ah' at the end of several sentences, adding on to the words 'choses', 'sec', 'valise', and 'gauche'. Simple questions: 1) Why??? 2) How would one know when to do that???

I've noticed in the conversations that the speakers will sometimes add an extra syllable, fairly softly/slightly and pronounced sort of like 'ah', at the end of a phrase or sentence. This is very apparent in Isabella's lines in French 4, Session 20, where she adds an 'ah' at the end of several sentences, adding on to the words 'choses', 'sec', 'valise', and 'gauche'. Simple questions: 1) Why??? 2) How would one know when to do that???

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srfr
Well, where is Caroline (the tutor/moderator) from? She seems to speak the most clearly and without any particular accent - at least, to my ear and my limited knowledge of regional French accents. I hear "Isabella" using the "ah" very often, but never Caroline when she reviews the same conversation in which "Isabella does it repeatedly. All those ah's sound like an affectation to me. Am I wrong about that? Is Caroline's diction what we should be striving for?

Well, where is Caroline (the tutor/moderator) from? She seems to speak the most clearly and without any particular accent - at least, to my ear and my limited knowledge of regional French accents. I hear "Isabella" using the "ah" very often, but never Caroline when she reviews the same conversation in which "Isabella does it repeatedly. All those ah's sound like an affectation to me. Am I wrong about that? Is Caroline's diction what we should be striving for?

Emilie Poyet
Caroline is from Paris, yet she has a very neutral accent and clear pronunciation, so I would recommend to strive for her diction. There are many many regional variants though, like the one you mention from Isabella in level 4. In the South East for example (in Marseille in particular) they tend to add this "ah" sound at the end of many words and sentences. The dialogues will help train your ear to understand people in spite of these variants in real life contexts.

Caroline is from Paris, yet she has a very neutral accent and clear pronunciation, so I would recommend to strive for her diction. There are many many regional variants though, like the one you mention from Isabella in level 4. In the South East for example (in Marseille in particular) they tend to add this "ah" sound at the end of many words and sentences. The dialogues will help train your ear to understand people in spite of these variants in real life contexts.

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