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sierradave

Posts: 0
Progreso, Yucatan
United States
I keep running across words that are used differently here in Yucatan Mexico, where I now live, for example "coche" instead of "auto." Also, Sonia pronounces some"ll" sounds like an English "j", which we don't hear very much around here. But one more important difference is the word "apellido," which lesson 1:12 translates as "last name." That could get somebody REALLY confused in all of Mexico. Names here have 4 or more parts, of which the last one in the spring is the "paterno' and the SECOND FROM LAST is the "materno," which is much more important. The apellido of Sr. Juan Jose Garcia Lopez is Garcia, NOT Lopez. You would greet him as "Señor Garcia." So I would suggest that in the next update, instead of translating "apellido" to "last name," translate it to "surname" instead. At least in Mexico that would be way more accurate. By the way, this gets messy filling in online forms in Mexico, where Nombre, Materno and Paterno fields must all be filled in. I end up putting my First Middle and Last names in there, which means I show up in a lot of databases with my middle name as the surname. When I have to have anyone look me up and they can't find me, I have them look under my middle name, and bingo.

I keep running across words that are used differently here in Yucatan Mexico, where I now live, for example "coche" instead of "auto." Also, Sonia pronounces some"ll" sounds like an English "j", which we don't hear very much around here.
But one more important difference is the word "apellido," which lesson 1:12 translates as "last name." That could get somebody REALLY confused in all of Mexico.
Names here have 4 or more parts, of which the last one in the spring is the "paterno' and the SECOND FROM LAST is the "materno," which is much more important. The apellido of Sr. Juan Jose Garcia Lopez is Garcia, NOT Lopez. You would greet him as "Señor Garcia."
So I would suggest that in the next update, instead of translating "apellido" to "last name," translate it to "surname" instead. At least in Mexico that would be way more accurate.
By the way, this gets messy filling in online forms in Mexico, where Nombre, Materno and Paterno fields must all be filled in. I end up putting my First Middle and Last names in there, which means I show up in a lot of databases with my middle name as the surname. When I have to have anyone look me up and they can't find me, I have them look under my middle name, and bingo.

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Apolonia D.
Hi Sierradave! Thanks for your comment, we'll keep it in mind for future updates. In most Spanish speaking countries people have two surnames, one taken from the father and another one taken from the mother. That's why in many forms you'll see "Apellidos" in the plural form. Not all countries have the same "rules" regarding the order of surnames, but in many of them the father's surname comes first. Thanks for sharing your experience!

Hi Sierradave! Thanks for your comment, we'll keep it in mind for future updates. In most Spanish speaking countries people have two surnames, one taken from the father and another one taken from the mother. That's why in many forms you'll see "Apellidos" in the plural form. Not all countries have the same "rules" regarding the order of surnames, but in many of them the father's surname comes first. Thanks for sharing your experience!

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Maybe this comes up much later in the series. A lot of expats I know start--very early in their new life experience--fixing up and/or renovation their home. The need is very sudden to say things like "My water doesn't work" or "We want to put a new wall over here." Maybe I'm way jumping the gun, but a "Fluenz for Expats," that would reorder a lot of the subject-oriented material (shove the restaurant stuff down a ways; do a scene in a hardware store) could be really valuable.

Maybe this comes up much later in the series. A lot of expats I know start--very early in their new life experience--fixing up and/or renovation their home. The need is very sudden to say things like "My water doesn't work" or "We want to put a new wall over here." Maybe I'm way jumping the gun, but a "Fluenz for Expats," that would reorder a lot of the subject-oriented material (shove the restaurant stuff down a ways; do a scene in a hardware store) could be really valuable.

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