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Ruth Adele

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Glen Ellyn, Illinois
United States
In the flashcard"s for session 28 of Italian 2, there is an inaccuracy. The English copy reads "(It)'s between the subway station and the cathedral". The program won't accept "stazione" in the answer, it will only accept "fermata".

In the flashcard"s for session 28 of Italian 2, there is an inaccuracy. The English copy reads "(It)'s between the subway station and the cathedral". The program won't accept "stazione" in the answer, it will only accept "fermata".

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Good morning, I cannot figure out how to make a grave accent mark in flashcards. Can anyone tell me?

Good morning, I cannot figure out how to make a grave accent mark in flashcards. Can anyone tell me?

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andy@fluenz
You're welcome!

You're welcome!

Marilyn Lee
If you're using a MAC computer, you probably already have two built-in choices to add the grave accent to a vowel; for instance (è): (1) Grave Accent: Hold down the Option Key and tap the `/~ key (the grave/tilde key - the key directly to the left of the number 1 key on an English keyboard). That will display the grave accent on your screen and (at least on my screen) a yellow "bar holder" that awaits your choice of a letter to accent. Then to create the accented letter "à," just tap the "A" key for à in lower case, or use the Shift + A key for À in upper case. Use the same technique for any vowel: à, è, ì, ò, ù - À, È, Ì, Ò, Ù. For other vowel accents: Acute Accent: Option Key + E, then tap the vowel to be accented; for instance (á). Circumflex Accent: Option Key + I, then tap the vowel to be accented; for instance (û) Diaeresis (tréma) Accent: Option Key + U, then tap the vowel to be accented; for instance (ë) OR (2) Press and HOLD down the letter you want to add an accent to until very quickly a small menu of accented letter options with assigned numbers appear directly above the letter you just added to your screen. Let's say you want to add the letter "e" with a grave accent. When you hold down the letter E, the Menu will pop up, and you will see that the menu option for è is number "1." Just tap "1" and the computer inserts an è on your screen. You will see that there are 7 different accent marks available for the letter "e" to choose from: (in numerical order) è, é, ê, ë, ē, ė, ę. So if you wanted an "e" with an acute accent, you would have selected 2 instead of 1. You do NOT have to continue holding down the letter "e" while you type a number nor when just deciding which menu number to press. The menu will stay on the screen until you either tap a number, tap a different letter, or click back in the screen. To place an accent on a CAPITAL letter, press and hold both the Shift and the letter key until the menu appears showing the capitalized letters with accents; then make your selection as usual. The MAC Accents Menu allows for a variety of language choices, so there are a variety of accents for each letter, several of which you may never need to use. (Note: In addition to the vowels, the MAC menu also provides accents for the consonants: s, y, l, z, c, and n.) The menu assigns the most-used accent for each letter as the number 1 choice. So, since the circumflex is the most commonly-used accent for the letter "u," you will see that the first choice for the letter "u" will produce a circumflex accent and not a grave accent as for the letters "a" and "e." Therefore, if you want to type the French "bien sûr, you will select "1" as your menu choice for the "u" in "sûr. Because the letter "c" with a cedilla is so commonly used in French, you can quickly do Option + C to get a lower case ç , or do Shift + Option Key + C to get an upper case Ç. And for those needing the tilde over the letter "n," you can do Option Key + N to display a tilde, then tap the N for lower case ñ, or Option Key + Shift + N for capital Ñ.

If you're using a MAC computer, you probably already have two built-in choices to add the grave accent to a vowel; for instance (è):
(1) Grave Accent: Hold down the Option Key and tap the `/~ key (the grave/tilde key - the key directly to the left of the number 1 key on an English keyboard). That will display the grave accent on your screen and (at least on my screen) a yellow "bar holder" that awaits your choice of a letter to accent. Then to create the accented letter "à," just tap the "A" key for à in lower case, or use the Shift + A key for À in upper case. Use the same technique for any vowel: à, è, ì, ò, ù - À, È, Ì, Ò, Ù.
For other vowel accents:
Acute Accent: Option Key + E, then tap the vowel to be accented; for instance (á).
Circumflex Accent: Option Key + I, then tap the vowel to be accented; for instance (û)
Diaeresis (tréma) Accent: Option Key + U, then tap the vowel to be accented; for instance (ë)
OR
(2) Press and HOLD down the letter you want to add an accent to until very quickly a small menu of accented letter options with assigned numbers appear directly above the letter you just added to your screen. Let's say you want to add the letter "e" with a grave accent. When you hold down the letter E, the Menu will pop up, and you will see that the menu option for è is number "1." Just tap "1" and the computer inserts an è on your screen. You will see that there are 7 different accent marks available for the letter "e" to choose from: (in numerical order) è, é, ê, ë, ē, ė, ę. So if you wanted an "e" with an acute accent, you would have selected 2 instead of 1. You do NOT have to continue holding down the letter "e" while you type a number nor when just deciding which menu number to press. The menu will stay on the screen until you either tap a number, tap a different letter, or click back in the screen. To place an accent on a CAPITAL letter, press and hold both the Shift and the letter key until the menu appears showing the capitalized letters with accents; then make your selection as usual.
The MAC Accents Menu allows for a variety of language choices, so there are a variety of accents for each letter, several of which you may never need to use. (Note: In addition to the vowels, the MAC menu also provides accents for the consonants: s, y, l, z, c, and n.) The menu assigns the most-used accent for each letter as the number 1 choice. So, since the circumflex is the most commonly-used accent for the letter "u," you will see that the first choice for the letter "u" will produce a circumflex accent and not a grave accent as for the letters "a" and "e." Therefore, if you want to type the French "bien sûr, you will select "1" as your menu choice for the "u" in "sûr. Because the letter "c" with a cedilla is so commonly used in French, you can quickly do Option + C to get a lower case ç , or do Shift + Option Key + C to get an upper case Ç. And for those needing the tilde over the letter "n," you can do Option Key + N to display a tilde, then tap the N for lower case ñ, or Option Key + Shift + N for capital Ñ.

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I just did session 24 in Italian 2. The lesson emphasizes that descriptive adjectives always follow the noun they modify, which is consistent with earlier lessons. In one of the lesson's exercises, though, the phrase "nuovo progetto" is consistently used, as opposed to "progetto nuovo". Anyone have any ideas why there is this discrepancy?

I just did session 24 in Italian 2. The lesson emphasizes that descriptive adjectives always follow the noun they modify, which is consistent with earlier lessons. In one of the lesson's exercises, though, the phrase "nuovo progetto" is consistently used, as opposed to "progetto nuovo". Anyone have any ideas why there is this discrepancy?

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August Bagarozzi
ITALIAN ADJECTIVES THAT PRECEDE NOUNS bello beautiful bravo good, able brutto ugly buono good caro dear cattivo bad giovane young grande large; great lungo long nuovo new piccolo small, little stesso same vecchio old vero true But even these adjectives must follow the noun for emphasis or contrast, and when modified by an adverb.

ITALIAN ADJECTIVES THAT PRECEDE NOUNS
bello beautiful
bravo good, able
brutto ugly
buono good
caro dear
cattivo bad
giovane young
grande large; great
lungo long
nuovo new
piccolo small, little
stesso same
vecchio old
vero true
But even these adjectives must follow the noun for emphasis or contrast, and when modified by an adverb.

Ruth Adele
thank you, I don't remember that lesson, but it certainly would explain a lot!

thank you, I don't remember that lesson, but it certainly would explain a lot!

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In Italian 2, session 22, a flashcard reads: "Do (you) already know what (you) want to eat? The accepted translation is: "Sa gia che cosa vuole mangiare". NOT accepted is sa gia che cosa vuole da mangiare. In the lesson, there is an example with "vuole da bere" (structured as I expected the flashcard to be structured). Is this simply an error in the flashcards, or is there an exception to the rule of which I am unaware? Thank you for any help!

In Italian 2, session 22, a flashcard reads: "Do (you) already know what (you) want to eat? The accepted translation is: "Sa gia che cosa vuole mangiare". NOT accepted is sa gia che cosa vuole da mangiare. In the lesson, there is an example with "vuole da bere" (structured as I expected the flashcard to be structured). Is this simply an error in the flashcards, or is there an exception to the rule of which I am unaware? Thank you for any help!

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Fabrice
"da" transforms the verb mangiare to a passive form. "che cosa vuole da mangiare" = "what do you want to be eaten". Those types of prepositions are very rare in english and very common in italian or french. I think the program should accept the "da mangiare" in this case. An italian expert may have a better in-depth explanation about that preposition.

"da" transforms the verb mangiare to a passive form. "che cosa vuole da mangiare" = "what do you want to be eaten". Those types of prepositions are very rare in english and very common in italian or french. I think the program should accept the "da mangiare" in this case. An italian expert may have a better in-depth explanation about that preposition.

Ruth Adele
Thanks, Fabrice. I'll see if anyone else weighs in. I agree that da mangiare should be accepted.

Thanks, Fabrice. I'll see if anyone else weighs in. I agree that da mangiare should be accepted.

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I understood from earlier sessions that "i" is always to precede "soldi" (e.g. "i soldi"). In Italian 2 session 19 or 20 flashcards, there are 2 cards using the verb to have. One says "I have money to...", the other "I have no money to". one of these only accepts "i soldi" as the correct answer, the other only accepts "soldi" (sans "i") as the correct answer. Is there a rule of thumb I should know about?

I understood from earlier sessions that "i" is always to precede "soldi" (e.g. "i soldi"). In Italian 2 session 19 or 20 flashcards, there are 2 cards using the verb to have. One says "I have money to...", the other "I have no money to". one of these only accepts "i soldi" as the correct answer, the other only accepts "soldi" (sans "i") as the correct answer. Is there a rule of thumb I should know about?

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August Bagarozzi
I would like an answer to that question, also. Google translate comes up with the following English to Italian translation: I have money to Ho I soldi per I have no money to Non ho soldi per In English you can say: I have money to or I have the money to but you can't say: I have no money to or I have no THE money to Maybe Italian works the same way. I don't know.

I would like an answer to that question, also.

Google translate comes up with the following English to Italian translation:
I have money to Ho I soldi per
I have no money to Non ho soldi per

In English you can say: I have money to or I have the money to
but you can't say: I have no money to or I have no THE money to

Maybe Italian works the same way. I don't know.

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In Italian 2, session 19, we are told that "prima" + "di" = "before". In the exercises for the lesson, and also in the flashcards for this session, that is regarded as an incorrect answer. The answer given in each instance by the program is "prima" alone, which simply means first, doesn't it? What am I missing?

In Italian 2, session 19, we are told that "prima" + "di" = "before". In the exercises for the lesson, and also in the flashcards for this session, that is regarded as an incorrect answer. The answer given in each instance by the program is "prima" alone, which simply means first, doesn't it? What am I missing?

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Riff251
I can't swear that I'm right but here's how I look at it: Primo (first) is an adjective and must agree in gender with a noun. It only becomes Prima when paired with a feminine noun. Therefore: Il primo tempo = the first time La mia prima macchina = My first car. To use Prima as before it becomes an adverb and must be connected to a verb or phrase by the preposition "di." Prima di parti lavoro. = Before you leave work. I think of Primo and Prima as two different words. (First and Before, respectively) Prima as first, only occurs in the context of a feminine noun. Later on, you'll get sentences like this: I lived here before. - Ho abitato qui prima.

I can't swear that I'm right but here's how I look at it: Primo (first) is an adjective and must agree in gender with a noun. It only becomes Prima when paired with a feminine noun. Therefore: Il primo tempo = the first time La mia prima macchina = My first car. To use Prima as before it becomes an adverb and must be connected to a verb or phrase by the preposition "di." Prima di parti lavoro. = Before you leave work. I think of Primo and Prima as two different words. (First and Before, respectively) Prima as first, only occurs in the context of a feminine noun. Later on, you'll get sentences like this: I lived here before. - Ho abitato qui prima.

Apolonia D.
Hi Ruth, you are right, when "before" is followed by a noun or a verb, in Italian we use "prima di", as in "prima delle otto" or "prima di mangiare". "Prima" on its own means "first" and it can also be translated as "before", but we explain this later in the program (in level 5). So in level 2 the program should accept "prima di" as a correct answer. We'll correct this, thanks for pointing it out.

Hi Ruth, you are right, when "before" is followed by a noun or a verb, in Italian we use "prima di", as in "prima delle otto" or "prima di mangiare". "Prima" on its own means "first" and it can also be translated as "before", but we explain this later in the program (in level 5). So in level 2 the program should accept "prima di" as a correct answer. We'll correct this, thanks for pointing it out.

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I hope someone can help me understand something. In an Italian 2 session, there is a flashcard that reads: "Vorrei telefonare al museo per andare domani." Why is the word "per" used? This is likely in a lesson somewhere, but I can't find it. Thank you if you can help!

I hope someone can help me understand something. In an Italian 2 session, there is a flashcard that reads: "Vorrei telefonare al museo per andare domani." Why is the word "per" used? This is likely in a lesson somewhere, but I can't find it. Thank you if you can help!

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DennisG
This question pops up surprisingly often. In this case, you can think of "per" as meaning "for the purpose of...". That's how it's used in Italian. The trouble (not just in Italian) is when you try to translate a sentence word for word from English into a foreign language. It often doesn't work, as you've seen in this case.

This question pops up surprisingly often.

In this case, you can think of "per" as meaning "for the purpose of...". That's how it's used in Italian. The trouble (not just in Italian) is when you try to translate a sentence word for word from English into a foreign language. It often doesn't work, as you've seen in this case.

Ruth Adele
Thank you, Dennis - I'm sure this will also provide clarification in other instances as I venture into future levels of Italian. I appreciate your help.

Thank you, Dennis - I'm sure this will also provide clarification in other instances as I venture into future levels of Italian. I appreciate your help.

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