no

Ross

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Phoenix, AZ
United States
The infinitive for some words is typically indicated by ending in "-ar". Thus "TO speak" is "hablAR." But it seems in some situations, you need to add the "a" for "to" even in the infinitive form. Thus a flashcard indicates "I learned TO SPEAK French" is best translated as "Yo aprendí A hablar francés." What is the rule for when to add "a" (for "to") when using the infinitive (which in other situations INCLUDES the "to")?

The infinitive for some words is typically indicated by ending in "-ar". Thus "TO speak" is "hablAR."

But it seems in some situations, you need to add the "a" for "to" even in the infinitive form. Thus a flashcard indicates "I learned TO SPEAK French" is best translated as "Yo aprendí A hablar francés." What is the rule for when to add "a" (for "to") when using the infinitive (which in other situations INCLUDES the "to")?

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Banjolover47
I think it is the verb aprender which requires the preposition "a" no matter what follows it, be it a noun or an invinitive (verb). There are many verbs which require either "a" or "de", and I think they just have to be learned. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

I think it is the verb aprender which requires the preposition "a" no matter what follows it, be it a noun or an invinitive (verb). There are many verbs which require either "a" or "de", and I think they just have to be learned. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

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In the flashcards, we are asked to translate "...where my car keys are?" I offered "Donde están mis llaves de auto". You wanted "Las llaves de mi auto." I don't understand. The keys are mine. The car is mine. Why is "my car keys" "the keys of my car" rather than "my keys of the car". Or "my keys of my car."?

In the flashcards, we are asked to translate "...where my car keys are?"

I offered "Donde están mis llaves de auto". You wanted "Las llaves de mi auto."

I don't understand. The keys are mine. The car is mine. Why is "my car keys" "the keys of my car" rather than "my keys of the car". Or "my keys of my car."?

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Ross
Yes, you're right about "mis llaves." Correction made above, thanks. Still don't see why "the keys of my car" is better than "my keys of the car" or "my keys of my car" when I seek the deeper meaning of "my car keys". To me, the stress is on the fact the keys are mine.

Yes, you're right about "mis llaves." Correction made above, thanks. Still don't see why "the keys of my car" is better than "my keys of the car" or "my keys of my car" when I seek the deeper meaning of "my car keys". To me, the stress is on the fact the keys are mine.

Ross
If I were talking about my keys to my wife's car, I'd still call them "my car keys".

If I were talking about my keys to my wife's car, I'd still call them "my car keys".

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Beginning somewhere in Spanish 2 and extending into Spanish 3 (and presumably beyond), Ms. Gill makes more and more comments in her introductory and concluding segments in Spanish. That certainly seems reasonable. But here's my question: I'm now at Spanish 3, lesson 6, and more and more I can not merely not adequately translate into English what she's saying, I can't really even make out what she's saying in Spanish. It just flies by and it seems half the words are ones I've never heard before. Yet I seem to be doing a pretty good job on each of the lessons. What am I missing?

Beginning somewhere in Spanish 2 and extending into Spanish 3 (and presumably beyond), Ms. Gill makes more and more comments in her introductory and concluding segments in Spanish. That certainly seems reasonable. But here's my question: I'm now at Spanish 3, lesson 6, and more and more I can not merely not adequately translate into English what she's saying, I can't really even make out what she's saying in Spanish. It just flies by and it seems half the words are ones I've never heard before. Yet I seem to be doing a pretty good job on each of the lessons. What am I missing?

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Fabrice
I don't like how slow the woman (not Sonya) speaks on level 3. I want real conversation like Sonya's introductions. Listen and watch movies. I watched "Como agua para chocolate" which is a movie that Sonya recommended, and I this movie has very basic spanish, very easy to understand. I would watch the movie once with subtitles, and don't be disappointed if you only catch 5% of the dialog, because you're trying to understand the dialog as well as trying to follow the movie. Then watch the movie again. Pause it after each dialog. You'll be amazed at how much you understand. Don't give up!

I don't like how slow the woman (not Sonya) speaks on level 3. I want real conversation like Sonya's introductions. Listen and watch movies. I watched "Como agua para chocolate" which is a movie that Sonya recommended, and I this movie has very basic spanish, very easy to understand. I would watch the movie once with subtitles, and don't be disappointed if you only catch 5% of the dialog, because you're trying to understand the dialog as well as trying to follow the movie. Then watch the movie again. Pause it after each dialog. You'll be amazed at how much you understand. Don't give up!

ladykate
Listening practice helps. Check out some movies (even English movies) and watch them in Spanish. Terminator, Casa de Mi Padre (Will Ferrell), and others help get you listening closely. Since Sonia usually repeats the Spanish clip with the English version, it is fairly easy.

Listening practice helps. Check out some movies (even English movies) and watch them in Spanish. Terminator, Casa de Mi Padre (Will Ferrell), and others help get you listening closely. Since Sonia usually repeats the Spanish clip with the English version, it is fairly easy.

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I'm unclear on the difference between--when one should use which--"dónde" and "adónde". Also, in listening to podcast 7, we were asked to translate menu, and instead of saying "la carta" the answer was "el menu" (since it was a podcast, I'm unsure of exact spelling). Which should be used when, or are they interchangeable?

I'm unclear on the difference between--when one should use which--"dónde" and "adónde". Also, in listening to podcast 7, we were asked to translate menu, and instead of saying "la carta" the answer was "el menu" (since it was a podcast, I'm unsure of exact spelling). Which should be used when, or are they interchangeable?

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Ross
Never mind. Figured it out. (I see no way to delete comments.)

Never mind. Figured it out. (I see no way to delete comments.)

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"Le gusta la sopa?". This was translated in an exercise as "Do you like soup?" NOT "Do you like THE soup?". When is the article not verbally acknowledged? It seems the translation is supposed to mean "Do you like [the category of] soup [as opposed to grains or meats]?". Would you phrase it differently if you wanted to ask "Do you like [this specific served to you] soup?", or is context our only guide?

"Le gusta la sopa?". This was translated in an exercise as "Do you like soup?" NOT "Do you like THE soup?". When is the article not verbally acknowledged? It seems the translation is supposed to mean "Do you like [the category of] soup [as opposed to grains or meats]?". Would you phrase it differently if you wanted to ask "Do you like [this specific served to you] soup?", or is context our only guide?

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DennisG
If I wanted to ask a person if he likes the soup he's currently eating, I'd be inclined to say, "Le gusta esa sopa?"

If I wanted to ask a person if he likes the soup he's currently eating, I'd be inclined to say, "Le gusta esa sopa?"

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1. On a Fluenz Flashcard, you translated: “This dish is very expensive, (I) want another one” as “Este plato is muy caro, quiero otro.” I am unclear if this means “This dish is very expensive so I want another DIFFERENT dish” or “This dish is very expensive BUT NONETHELESS I want another of THE SAME dish.” or if you cannot distinguish in Spanish these two different statements. 2. On numerous Flashcards combining infinitives—like “going to eat” or “going to go” or “going to shop”—sometimes you indicate the answer is “vamos comer” or “van ir” or “va comprar” and other times it’s “vamos a comer” or “va a comprar”. I’m not sure when to add an “a” for “to” and when the “to” is included in the infinitive (“comer” = “to eat”, not just “eat”)

1. On a Fluenz Flashcard, you translated: “This dish is very expensive, (I) want another one” as “Este plato is muy caro, quiero otro.” I am unclear if this means “This dish is very expensive so I want another DIFFERENT dish” or “This dish is very expensive BUT NONETHELESS I want another of THE SAME dish.” or if you cannot distinguish in Spanish these two different statements.

2. On numerous Flashcards combining infinitives—like “going to eat” or “going to go” or “going to shop”—sometimes you indicate the answer is “vamos comer” or “van ir” or “va comprar” and other times it’s “vamos a comer” or “va a comprar”. I’m not sure when to add an “a” for “to” and when the “to” is included in the infinitive (“comer” = “to eat”, not just “eat”)

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DennisG
You add the "a" after any form of the verb "ir." In your example, "van", "va", and "vamos" are all forms of "ir", so they require an "a" after them. Hence "vamos a comer" or "va a ir." Hope this helps.

You add the "a" after any form of the verb "ir." In your example, "van", "va", and "vamos" are all forms of "ir", so they require an "a" after them. Hence "vamos a comer" or "va a ir." Hope this helps.

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