no

rfox547743

Posts: 0
Lincolnshire, Illinois
Wow, I started Level 1 on May 15th and just finished Level 5. I worked every day and I think this program is exceptional. I've looked and used many other programs including Duolingo and Pimsleur. I listen to Pimsleur in the car. What I like about the Fluenz program is that it gives you the structure to understand, read and write on your own. With most of the other programs, they just throw vocabulary at you and pat phrases which isn't very helpful if you don't understand the underlying grammatical structure. It's unlikely you're going to use the exact same phrase you learn in conversation--you have to be able to apply the grammar to new vocabulary. I'm going to continue my journey. I've joined Yabla which is good because you watch and listen to video stories at normal German speaking speed. I've also downloaded short stories on Audible which is also good to listen to in the car. I'm probably going to take private lessons with Lingoda. I took the level test and tested into Level C1, which is probably a bit ambitious but it will be challenging. Also, a really good and comprehensive German grammar book is Hammer's German Grammar and Usage by Martin Durrell. Thank you to Fluenz for the great foundation.

Wow, I started Level 1 on May 15th and just finished Level 5. I worked every day and I think this program is exceptional. I've looked and used many other programs including Duolingo and Pimsleur. I listen to Pimsleur in the car. What I like about the Fluenz program is that it gives you the structure to understand, read and write on your own. With most of the other programs, they just throw vocabulary at you and pat phrases which isn't very helpful if you don't understand the underlying grammatical structure. It's unlikely you're going to use the exact same phrase you learn in conversation--you have to be able to apply the grammar to new vocabulary. I'm going to continue my journey. I've joined Yabla which is good because you watch and listen to video stories at normal German speaking speed. I've also downloaded short stories on Audible which is also good to listen to in the car. I'm probably going to take private lessons with Lingoda. I took the level test and tested into Level C1, which is probably a bit ambitious but it will be challenging. Also, a really good and comprehensive German grammar book is Hammer's German Grammar and Usage by Martin Durrell. Thank you to Fluenz for the great foundation.

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2 people find this helpful
rfox547743
I had some German in college 40+ years ago so there really wasn't much there. But I did devote a lot of time, generally minimum 2 hrs a day to the program, sometimes more. My usual routine was to do the flashcards from the previous lesson, then do the next lesson in the program. I would also listen to the comprehension and pronunciation audible programs, maybe every 4-5 days or so. Now that I'm done, I've started doing all the review session flashcards in each level. It generally takes an 1-1.5 hours to get through all the review sessions for a certain level. I have not gone back to listen to the video program unless there's something I don't feel I understand. I think the flashcard review does a pretty good job of refreshing your memory on any grammatical points you may have forgotten or vocab.

I had some German in college 40+ years ago so there really wasn't much there. But I did devote a lot of time, generally minimum 2 hrs a day to the program, sometimes more. My usual routine was to do the flashcards from the previous lesson, then do the next lesson in the program. I would also listen to the comprehension and pronunciation audible programs, maybe every 4-5 days or so. Now that I'm done, I've started doing all the review session flashcards in each level. It generally takes an 1-1.5 hours to get through all the review sessions for a certain level. I have not gone back to listen to the video program unless there's something I don't feel I understand. I think the flashcard review does a pretty good job of refreshing your memory on any grammatical points you may have forgotten or vocab.

mshideler
awesome. thanks for the answer. Sounds similar to what I do but my brain won't handle the pace of a session per day. That is impressive!

awesome. thanks for the answer. Sounds similar to what I do but my brain won't handle the pace of a session per day. That is impressive!

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He spoke with her lawyer's receptionist for twenty minutes yesterday is a sentence asked to be written in German. I wrote it as "Er hat gestern zwanzig Minuten mit der Sekretar ihrer Anwaltin gesprochen (I can't type umlauts for some reason in Commons) but the answer given is Er hat gestern zwanzig Minuten mit der Sekretar seiner Anwaltin gesprochen. This doesn't seem right because that means He spoke with his lawyer's receptionist for twenty minutes yesterday.

He spoke with her lawyer's receptionist for twenty minutes yesterday is a sentence asked to be written in German. I wrote it as "Er hat gestern zwanzig Minuten mit der Sekretar ihrer Anwaltin gesprochen (I can't type umlauts for some reason in Commons) but the answer given is Er hat gestern zwanzig Minuten mit der Sekretar seiner Anwaltin gesprochen. This doesn't seem right because that means He spoke with his lawyer's receptionist for twenty minutes yesterday.

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This is frustrating because I'm trying to post a question for German Level 5, not Spanish Level 5 and it keeps coming up as Spanish automatically. Why is this?

This is frustrating because I'm trying to post a question for German Level 5, not Spanish Level 5 and it keeps coming up as Spanish automatically. Why is this?

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ojosdeverdes
It means any improvements to the program should be accessible to all.

It means any improvements to the program should be accessible to all.

andy@fluenz
@ojosdeverdes We do provide free upgrades to the program to all users. If you have any questions or comments, feel free to contact us directly at usersupport@fluenz.com and we'll be happy to chat with you.

@ojosdeverdes We do provide free upgrades to the program to all users. If you have any questions or comments, feel free to contact us directly at usersupport@fluenz.com and we'll be happy to chat with you.

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In Lesson 29 there are two sentences where I'm confused with the sentence structure. The first sentence is Ich muss meinen Bruder vom Flughafen abholen. I thought the direct object goes at the end and the order is time, manner, place plus direct object. Why isn't it "Ich muss vom Flughafen meinen Bruder abholen" Likewise, another sentence is "Ich habe ein schones Sofa im Wohnzimmer." Why isn't it "Ich habe im Wohnzimmer ein schones Zimmer.

In Lesson 29 there are two sentences where I'm confused with the sentence structure.
The first sentence is Ich muss meinen Bruder vom Flughafen abholen. I thought the direct object goes at the end and the order is time, manner, place plus direct object. Why isn't it "Ich muss vom Flughafen meinen Bruder abholen"
Likewise, another sentence is "Ich habe ein schones Sofa im Wohnzimmer." Why isn't it "Ich habe im Wohnzimmer ein schones Zimmer.

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Emilie Poyet
Hi rfox, You're right to wonder about those two examples. In both cases it wouldn't be wrong to use the order you're suggesting and say: Ich muss vom Flughafen meinen Bruder abholen Ich habe im Wohnzimmer ein schones Zimmer Yet the other order is also possible, it all depends on the viewpoint... With places the order is a bit more flexible than with times, specially when the place describes the object and not the whole phrase. or also when it's a destination or an origin and not a location. Sentence order is quite complex in German and many times several options are possible, so be patient and open and little by little things will become emore natural, you'll see.

Hi rfox,
You're right to wonder about those two examples. In both cases it wouldn't be wrong to use the order you're suggesting and say:
Ich muss vom Flughafen meinen Bruder abholen
Ich habe im Wohnzimmer ein schones Zimmer
Yet the other order is also possible, it all depends on the viewpoint... With places the order is a bit more flexible than with times, specially when the place describes the object and not the whole phrase. or also when it's a destination or an origin and not a location.
Sentence order is quite complex in German and many times several options are possible, so be patient and open and little by little things will become emore natural, you'll see.

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Two questions from Session 4, Lesson 13--Genitive Case 1. In the Repeat the phrases at the end of the exercise, one phrase is Konnen Sie das Projekt des Kollegen erledigen? (Umlaut doesn't work in commons). Why isn't it "das Projekt des Kolleges" since the tutorial said you add an "s" to the noun and the singular is Kollege? 2. Genitive of man is des Manns and genitive of male friend is des Freunds; however, I have other German resources and they state the genitive is des Mannes and des Freundes and that in the genitive you can add either an "s" or "es" to the male or neuter singular nouns, so now I'm confused because the program says you only add an "s" By the way, I absolutely love this program!

Two questions from Session 4, Lesson 13--Genitive Case
1. In the Repeat the phrases at the end of the exercise, one phrase is Konnen Sie das Projekt des Kollegen erledigen? (Umlaut doesn't work in commons). Why isn't it "das Projekt des Kolleges" since the tutorial said you add an "s" to the noun and the singular is Kollege?
2. Genitive of man is des Manns and genitive of male friend is des Freunds; however, I have other German resources and they state the genitive is des Mannes and des Freundes and that in the genitive you can add either an "s" or "es" to the male or neuter singular nouns, so now I'm confused because the program says you only add an "s"

By the way, I absolutely love this program!

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CMcCullough
I asked the same question regarding this under "Session by Session". Emilie Poyet provided an answer. See https://commons.fluenz.com/german/posts/why-doesnt-masculine-noun-end-s-...

I asked the same question regarding this under "Session by Session". Emilie Poyet provided an answer. See https://commons.fluenz.com/german/posts/why-doesnt-masculine-noun-end-s-...

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I have a few questions following Session 4, review lesson 5: 1. Wir sind gestern nach Amerika und dann nach Europa in Urlaub gefahren. Does in Urlaub always have to be next to "fahren". I actually wrote the sentence as "Wir sind in Urlaub nach Amerika gefahren und dann nach Europa"-- is that wrong. I thought place would come after "in Urlaub" 2. Jeder Mann and Jede Frau dort ist sehr nett. Why isn't it "Jeder Mann und Jede Frau ist dort sehr nett"--I thought the verb had to be in the 2n position. 3. Wir haben um achtzehn Uhr eine Suppe mit ihnen gegessen. Why isn't it "Wir haben um achtzehn Uhr mit ihnen eine Suppe gegessen"--I thought the direct object should come at the end before the past participle of the verb

I have a few questions following Session 4, review lesson 5:
1. Wir sind gestern nach Amerika und dann nach Europa in Urlaub gefahren. Does in Urlaub always have to be next to "fahren". I actually wrote the sentence as "Wir sind in Urlaub nach Amerika gefahren und dann nach Europa"-- is that wrong. I thought place would come after "in Urlaub"
2. Jeder Mann and Jede Frau dort ist sehr nett. Why isn't it "Jeder Mann und Jede Frau ist dort sehr nett"--I thought the verb had to be in the 2n position.
3. Wir haben um achtzehn Uhr eine Suppe mit ihnen gegessen. Why isn't it "Wir haben um achtzehn Uhr mit ihnen eine Suppe gegessen"--I thought the direct object should come at the end before the past participle of the verb

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Emilie Poyet
Hi rfox, As I tried to explain to you in my previous answer, the placement of each element in the German sentence is not as clear cut, and many times several options are possible. About those 3 examples: 1. Yes, here it's more natural to put "in Urlaub" at the end because it kind of goes with "fahren" so it's better to always leave it as close to it as possible. 2. Here "dort" describes "Jeder Mann und jede Frau", it would be possible to put it at the end but in this case it would describe the whole phrase: (Every man and every woman is very kind there) 3. Here both orders are possible, depending what you want to emphasize

Hi rfox,
As I tried to explain to you in my previous answer, the placement of each element in the German sentence is not as clear cut, and many times several options are possible. About those 3 examples:
1. Yes, here it's more natural to put "in Urlaub" at the end because it kind of goes with "fahren" so it's better to always leave it as close to it as possible.
2. Here "dort" describes "Jeder Mann und jede Frau", it would be possible to put it at the end but in this case it would describe the whole phrase: (Every man and every woman is very kind there)
3. Here both orders are possible, depending what you want to emphasize

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Does anyone have a good summary for the placement of nicht in a complex sentence structure. I'm just starting Level 4.

Does anyone have a good summary for the placement of nicht in a complex sentence structure. I'm just starting Level 4.

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