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pskalstad

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Odda, Hordaland
United States
In the dialogue (and tutorial) of session 25, "cruzar" is translated as "to turn". I've looked in three separate dictionaries now, and not one of them suggests "turn" as a translation to "cruzar" ("to cross" is the most common suggestion). Am I missing something here?

In the dialogue (and tutorial) of session 25, "cruzar" is translated as "to turn". I've looked in three separate dictionaries now, and not one of them suggests "turn" as a translation to "cruzar" ("to cross" is the most common suggestion). Am I missing something here?

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pskalstad
Nevermind. I see this question has been asked several times before.

Nevermind. I see this question has been asked several times before.

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I think there are some mistakes in Fluenz Spanish 4, session 20: Match the phrases: I like this coat a lot, but there isn't my size Me gusta mucho ese abrigo, pero no hay mi talla (should be "este") Not too sure about this last one. Write the phrase you read: (It)'s a gift for you, I think you're going to love (it) Es un regalo para ti, yo creo que te va a encantar (shouldn't it be "vas"?)

I think there are some mistakes in Fluenz Spanish 4, session 20:

Match the phrases:
I like this coat a lot, but there isn't my size
Me gusta mucho ese abrigo, pero no hay mi talla (should be "este")

Not too sure about this last one.
Write the phrase you read:
(It)'s a gift for you, I think you're going to love (it)
Es un regalo para ti, yo creo que te va a encantar (shouldn't it be "vas"?)

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Hello, In "Match the Phrases" (level 3, session 30), the following sentences go together: My father goes bike riding every Sunday Mi padre va a montar en bicicleta todos los domingos Why does the Spanish sentence use the future tense here and not the English one? (I've seen this same construction + translation in previous sessions as well). Wouldn't a more accurate translation be: Mi padre monta en bicicleta todos los domingos? If "ir a montar en bicicleta" is a fixed expression, how do we distinguish between the present and future? Mi padre va a ir a montar en bicicleta?

Hello,

In "Match the Phrases" (level 3, session 30), the following sentences go together:

My father goes bike riding every Sunday
Mi padre va a montar en bicicleta todos los domingos

Why does the Spanish sentence use the future tense here and not the English one? (I've seen this same construction + translation in previous sessions as well). Wouldn't a more accurate translation be:

Mi padre monta en bicicleta todos los domingos?

If "ir a montar en bicicleta" is a fixed expression, how do we distinguish between the present and future? Mi padre va a ir a montar en bicicleta?

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Fabrice
Mi padre monta en bicicleta todos los domingos is translated to my father rides a bicycle every sunday. They used the "va a" because of the "goes", so it's not the future but rather a simple translation of "to go". Here you have a repetition of the action (todos los domingos), it not an immediate future like "next sunday". For example a future would be something like "my father is going to bike next sunday", and the translation would be "mi padre va a montar en bicicleta el próximo domingo". I hope that helps.

Mi padre monta en bicicleta todos los domingos is translated to my father rides a bicycle every sunday. They used the "va a" because of the "goes", so it's not the future but rather a simple translation of "to go". Here you have a repetition of the action (todos los domingos), it not an immediate future like "next sunday". For example a future would be something like "my father is going to bike next sunday", and the translation would be "mi padre va a montar en bicicleta el próximo domingo". I hope that helps.

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Hello, "Voy a esperarlos" is incorrect according to Fluenz (suggested answer: Voy a esperarla) But shouldn't it be "los" since I'm using the respectful, masculine plural form? Also, in the same session I tried translating "Before having lunch" with "Antes de comiendo" (suggested answer: Antes de comer). Could I use my variant, though?

Hello,

"Voy a esperarlos" is incorrect according to Fluenz (suggested answer: Voy a esperarla)

But shouldn't it be "los" since I'm using the respectful, masculine plural form?

Also, in the same session I tried translating "Before having lunch" with "Antes de comiendo" (suggested answer: Antes de comer). Could I use my variant, though?

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Apolonia D.
Hi, you are absolutely right, "(I)'m going to wait for you(p/r)" should be translated as "Voy a esperarlos", whereas "Voy a esperarla" is "(I)'m going to wait for her" or (I)'m going to wait for you(f/r)". Thanks for pointing it out, we have already corrected it and the update will be available as soon as possible. As for your second question, "antes de comiendo" is not correct, the structure is "Antes/Después de + infinitive verb". In Spanish,the rule is that whenever a preposition is immediately followed by a verb, that verb will always be in the infinitive form. This is not always true in English, we sometimes use an ING form after a prepostion, as in "I'm tired of waiting". However, in Spanish there are no exceptions and the verb after the preposition will always be in its infinitive form.

Hi, you are absolutely right, "(I)'m going to wait for you(p/r)" should be translated as "Voy a esperarlos", whereas "Voy a esperarla" is "(I)'m going to wait for her" or (I)'m going to wait for you(f/r)". Thanks for pointing it out, we have already corrected it and the update will be available as soon as possible.
As for your second question, "antes de comiendo" is not correct, the structure is "Antes/Después de + infinitive verb". In Spanish,the rule is that whenever a preposition is immediately followed by a verb, that verb will always be in the infinitive form. This is not always true in English, we sometimes use an ING form after a prepostion, as in "I'm tired of waiting". However, in Spanish there are no exceptions and the verb after the preposition will always be in its infinitive form.

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Hello, Just curious as to why the following sentence uses "ser" instead of "estár": No sé dónde es el museo We're talking about location now, aren't we?

Hello,

Just curious as to why the following sentence uses "ser" instead of "estár": No sé dónde es el museo

We're talking about location now, aren't we?

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ojosdeverdes
Yes, this was covered in an early session but Sonia said 'when in doubt, use estar' so your answer should have been accepted. In the upgrade there are instances where more than 1 answer will be accepted. I guess in this case it is about location, but that museum is not likely to move anytime soon, then again, it could move next week. So in that regard it is a gray area and está would be just as correct as es.

Yes, this was covered in an early session but Sonia said 'when in doubt, use estar' so your answer should have been accepted. In the upgrade there are instances where more than 1 answer will be accepted. I guess in this case it is about location, but that museum is not likely to move anytime soon, then again, it could move next week. So in that regard it is a gray area and está would be just as correct as es.

Fabrice
The question has been asked already, see http://commons.fluenz.com/spanish/posts/ser-vs-estar-0 it's a grey area, and está would work as well, you will hear both in that case.

The question has been asked already, see http://commons.fluenz.com/spanish/posts/ser-vs-estar-0 it's a grey area, and está would work as well, you will hear both in that case.

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Hola! Estoy muy contento de Fluenz, pero: in session 9 of Spanish 2, "eso" is introduced (puedo hacer eso mañana). I was hoping there would be an explanation as to why "ese/esa" wasn't used here instead, as that's what we've been using so far for "that". Am I right in thinking that "eso" is used here because the "that" is a demonstrative pronoun and not a determiner? Thanks in advance! Paul

Hola! Estoy muy contento de Fluenz, pero:

in session 9 of Spanish 2, "eso" is introduced (puedo hacer eso mañana). I was hoping there would be an explanation as to why "ese/esa" wasn't used here instead, as that's what we've been using so far for "that". Am I right in thinking that "eso" is used here because the "that" is a demonstrative pronoun and not a determiner?

Thanks in advance!

Paul

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zac.hilliker
This post was a while ago, so I hope you got an answer from somewhere or figured it out! When eso/esto is first introduced in level 2, Sonia says that it is used to refer to something generally. ese/este that/this (m) esos/estos those/these (m)(p) esa/esta that/this (f) esas/estas those/these (f)(p) These are used when you can determine the noun, and thus the gender, that you are referring to. In cases where you want to say this/that, but the thing you are referring to is either an idea, action, or something you are not familiar with, that is when you use eso/esto. A real-life example I can tell you, I was on a video chat with a Colombian friend who helps me with fitness tips. He described an exercise to me, and I tried to demonstrate what he was describing with my body. When I finally got it right, he exclaimed "Eso!" The "that" in this case doesn't have an object to refer to. We can pin it on "position" or "movement" or "exercise," but the "eso" in this case was just a general referral to what I was doing. I hope this is helpful and that I didn't make any mistakes!!

This post was a while ago, so I hope you got an answer from somewhere or figured it out! When eso/esto is first introduced in level 2, Sonia says that it is used to refer to something generally.

ese/este that/this (m) esos/estos those/these (m)(p)
esa/esta that/this (f) esas/estas those/these (f)(p)

These are used when you can determine the noun, and thus the gender, that you are referring to. In cases where you want to say this/that, but the thing you are referring to is either an idea, action, or something you are not familiar with, that is when you use eso/esto. A real-life example I can tell you, I was on a video chat with a Colombian friend who helps me with fitness tips. He described an exercise to me, and I tried to demonstrate what he was describing with my body. When I finally got it right, he exclaimed "Eso!" The "that" in this case doesn't have an object to refer to. We can pin it on "position" or "movement" or "exercise," but the "eso" in this case was just a general referral to what I was doing. I hope this is helpful and that I didn't make any mistakes!!

El Turco
I had been struggling with "eso". Thanks!

I had been struggling with "eso". Thanks!

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