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Pope Benedict XVI

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If you want a more full screen experience, just change your screen resolution when you use this software Settings>Displays>Resolutions: Choose 1024x640 and click ok. Restart fluenz and now it's much easier to see. For windows 7, I believe you right click the desktop and select screen resolution.

If you want a more full screen experience, just change your screen resolution when you use this software

Settings>Displays>Resolutions: Choose 1024x640 and click ok. Restart fluenz and now it's much easier to see.

For windows 7, I believe you right click the desktop and select screen resolution.

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Eric Biewener
For those who want to get really precise, the Fluenz screen is 950x535 px. Don't go below that and you're all good :)

For those who want to get really precise, the Fluenz screen is 950x535 px. Don't go below that and you're all good :)

KristaF
Wow! even the Pope is a fan of Fluenz!

Wow! even the Pope is a fan of Fluenz!

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Can somebody tell me if the 'Present Perfect' tense covered in Spanish Levels 1-5?

Can somebody tell me if the 'Present Perfect' tense covered in Spanish Levels 1-5?

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wcoy79
Leo, please be honest with me. I am about to finish Spanish II and everything that you just described seemed like I was reading French! I feel very confident with what I have learned, and even though present-perfect tense hasn't been covered in Spanish II, should I feel overwhelmed that I haven't a clue how to use it?

Leo, please be honest with me. I am about to finish Spanish II and everything that you just described seemed like I was reading French! I feel very confident with what I have learned, and even though present-perfect tense hasn't been covered in Spanish II, should I feel overwhelmed that I haven't a clue how to use it?

Leo
Hi, this can be complicated, I'll try to explain it as simple as I can. Most of the times questions in LA Spanish will be asked in simple past tense (¿Fuiste a México?) (Did you to go Mexico?). The only exception is when asking if you have ever gone somewhere or done something. For instance: "¿Has ido a...?" (Have you gone to...?) or usually too "¿Has ido alguna vez...?" (Have you ever gone to...?), then you use present-perfect tense for a reply: "Sí, he ido" (Yes I have gone) Now, when you want to ask in present-perfect tense in English as in "Have you done something?" (no 'ever' here), when you reply "Yes", answers and questions will be in simple past in Spanish: Have you done your homework? --- ¿Hiciste la tarea? Yes I have done it --- Sí, la hice In English Q&A are in present-perfect, but in Spanish they're in simple past. This is when the answer is positive. In negative case, the question pattern stays the same, but the answer can be in both present-perfect tense and simple past Have you done your homework? -- ¿Hiciste la tarea? No, I have not done it yet --- No, no la he hecho todavía // No, no la hice The rule here is the "yet". When you include "Yet" (Todavía) in your negative reply, you have to make it in present-perfect tense. Otherwise it stays as usual, in simple past. Hope this helps!

Hi, this can be complicated, I'll try to explain it as simple as I can. Most of the times questions in LA Spanish will be asked in simple past tense (¿Fuiste a México?) (Did you to go Mexico?). The only exception is when asking if you have ever gone somewhere or done something. For instance: "¿Has ido a...?" (Have you gone to...?) or usually too "¿Has ido alguna vez...?" (Have you ever gone to...?), then you use present-perfect tense for a reply: "Sí, he ido" (Yes I have gone)

Now, when you want to ask in present-perfect tense in English as in "Have you done something?" (no 'ever' here), when you reply "Yes", answers and questions will be in simple past in Spanish:
Have you done your homework? --- ¿Hiciste la tarea?
Yes I have done it --- Sí, la hice

In English Q&A are in present-perfect, but in Spanish they're in simple past. This is when the answer is positive.

In negative case, the question pattern stays the same, but the answer can be in both present-perfect tense and simple past
Have you done your homework? -- ¿Hiciste la tarea?
No, I have not done it yet --- No, no la he hecho todavía // No, no la hice

The rule here is the "yet". When you include "Yet" (Todavía) in your negative reply, you have to make it in present-perfect tense. Otherwise it stays as usual, in simple past. Hope this helps!

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In the Match the Words Section of Spanish 3, session 20, the english phrase "Esas son más baratas" is matched with the english phrase "These (f) are cheaper". Shouldn't it be 'Those are cheaper'? Is this a typo or am I incorrect?

In the Match the Words Section of Spanish 3, session 20, the english phrase "Esas son más baratas" is matched with the english phrase "These (f) are cheaper".

Shouldn't it be 'Those are cheaper'? Is this a typo or am I incorrect?

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FluenzLab
Thanks for pointing this out Tyler, this is indeed a typo: Esas means Those, while Estas means These. We are on it and will let you know when the update is available.

Thanks for pointing this out Tyler, this is indeed a typo: Esas means Those, while Estas means These. We are on it and will let you know when the update is available.

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Match the Words. The english translation reads: "The swimming pool in on the third floor." Should obviously say, "The swimming pool IS on the third floor."

Match the Words. The english translation reads: "The swimming pool in on the third floor."

Should obviously say, "The swimming pool IS on the third floor."

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Leo
Dear Tyler, thanks for letting us know of that typo. I'm sorry we didn't realize we had made a mistake earlier. Our development team will get to it, correct it and make an update for you and other users to download so that it fixes this. I'll let you know when it's ready. Cheers.

Dear Tyler, thanks for letting us know of that typo. I'm sorry we didn't realize we had made a mistake earlier. Our development team will get to it, correct it and make an update for you and other users to download so that it fixes this. I'll let you know when it's ready. Cheers.

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In lesson 10 of Spanish 3, we are given prepositional phrases. One of the words is 'adelante', which in the lesson, is translated as 'in front of'. We are then given a sentence as an example, "Adelante de edificio"(Infront of the building). However, after cross checking with my dictionary and a native speaker, it is my understanding that the correct word would be "delante", and "adelante" would be used when implying motion of an object, in the same way 'adónde' instead of 'dónde' implies motion. Could somebody please clarify the content of this lesson?

In lesson 10 of Spanish 3, we are given prepositional phrases. One of the words is 'adelante', which in the lesson, is translated as 'in front of'.
We are then given a sentence as an example, "Adelante de edificio"(Infront of the building).

However, after cross checking with my dictionary and a native speaker, it is my understanding that the correct word would be "delante", and "adelante" would be used when implying motion of an object, in the same way 'adónde' instead of 'dónde' implies motion.

Could somebody please clarify the content of this lesson?

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Leo
Hi Tyler! As a native speaker, I have heard both used in this case, as in making reference to a location. The only case where you would use "adelante" and not "delante" is when you're saying to somebody for instance, "Ve adelante" -- "go ahead" or "go in the front". Otherwise, to indicate location of a place both are perfectly usable. Now in regards to "a dónde" and "dónde", it's pretty much the same scenario. "¿A dónde voy?" and "¿Dónde voy?" mean exactly the same: "Where do I go?". "Dónde voy" would sound more colloquial, and you're omitting the "a" which would be pointing towards a direction, but the word "dónde" already means "where", so, it's in a way a double affirmation. "¿a dónde?" literally translates as "towards where?" and "¿dónde?" as "where?". But they both mean the same. Hope this helps! Have a great weekend!

Hi Tyler! As a native speaker, I have heard both used in this case, as in making reference to a location. The only case where you would use "adelante" and not "delante" is when you're saying to somebody for instance, "Ve adelante" -- "go ahead" or "go in the front". Otherwise, to indicate location of a place both are perfectly usable.

Now in regards to "a dónde" and "dónde", it's pretty much the same scenario. "¿A dónde voy?" and "¿Dónde voy?" mean exactly the same: "Where do I go?". "Dónde voy" would sound more colloquial, and you're omitting the "a" which would be pointing towards a direction, but the word "dónde" already means "where", so, it's in a way a double affirmation. "¿a dónde?" literally translates as "towards where?" and "¿dónde?" as "where?". But they both mean the same. Hope this helps! Have a great weekend!

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In the video for Session 6 of Spanish 2, Sonya said that from now on, only the Usted form will be accepted as an answer for you. Does this mean that using tú is not used again in the program or does it get reintroduced later on? Will this impact my ability to have casual conversation with familiar people?

In the video for Session 6 of Spanish 2, Sonya said that from now on, only the Usted form will be accepted as an answer for you. Does this mean that using tú is not used again in the program or does it get reintroduced later on? Will this impact my ability to have casual conversation with familiar people?

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James Putney
Sure, there is a lot of "tu" later on. I think what she means is if you are asked to translate "you" the answer is "usted." If they want "tu" they will ask for "you(i)" meaning "you-informal."

Sure, there is a lot of "tu" later on. I think what she means is if you are asked to translate "you" the answer is "usted." If they want "tu" they will ask for "you(i)" meaning "you-informal."

Pope Benedict XVI
Thanks!

Thanks!

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