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ojosdeverdes

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belleplaine, mn
I remember some months ago when some people, myself included, were talking about the Spanish speakers speaking too fast, in one workout in particular in the upgraded version where the sentences build and get long and it's nearly impossible to understand what is being said, especially when they slur right past certain words. I was directed to a website where those having trouble could do the lessons and slow down the speakers. Is there such a site where we can slow down the speaker and, if so, can someone direct me to it? Thanks.

I remember some months ago when some people, myself included, were talking about the Spanish speakers speaking too fast, in one workout in particular in the upgraded version where the sentences build and get long and it's nearly impossible to understand what is being said, especially when they slur right past certain words. I was directed to a website where those having trouble could do the lessons and slow down the speakers. Is there such a site where we can slow down the speaker and, if so, can someone direct me to it? Thanks.

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ojosdeverdes
@zac hilliker, OK, I found the toggles. I went to the main site and logged in and went to my latest position and there they were. I think the problem was I was using the app to access the lessons I have downloaded on my Mac. Although it probably shouldn't make a difference, it apparently does. I kind of like having the music on too. So, once again, muchos gracias.

@zac hilliker, OK, I found the toggles. I went to the main site and logged in and went to my latest position and there they were. I think the problem was I was using the app to access the lessons I have downloaded on my Mac. Although it probably shouldn't make a difference, it apparently does. I kind of like having the music on too. So, once again, muchos gracias.

zac.hilliker
Not a separate website, but within the Fluenz program there is a button at the top. So there is the volume control, a "Music" on/off toggle, and a "Slow Sound" on/off toggle. Personally, I use the arrow keys a lot during the workouts. The up key repeats the phrase, and the down key displays the answer. In the "Write what you hear" exercises throughout the program, I have used this easy repeat button more than anything else to make sure that I sharpen my listening comprehension. The audio recordings, separate from the lessons, are also really helpful. I don't have as much of a problem with the speakers being too fast. I can't quite type as fast as they speak, but by the time I finished level 5 I was able to listen to and write the longer sentences without having the speaker repeat it.

Not a separate website, but within the Fluenz program there is a button at the top. So there is the volume control, a "Music" on/off toggle, and a "Slow Sound" on/off toggle. Personally, I use the arrow keys a lot during the workouts. The up key repeats the phrase, and the down key displays the answer. In the "Write what you hear" exercises throughout the program, I have used this easy repeat button more than anything else to make sure that I sharpen my listening comprehension. The audio recordings, separate from the lessons, are also really helpful. I don't have as much of a problem with the speakers being too fast. I can't quite type as fast as they speak, but by the time I finished level 5 I was able to listen to and write the longer sentences without having the speaker repeat it.

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In the Spanish upgrade there is a female speaker who pronounces the double L sound like a hard J and is very difficult to understand. Instead of Llevar, the double L sounding like Y as in Yam, we get Jevar. Other examples are Jegar rather than Llegar, and ejos rather than ellos, and so on with each word with a double L. This makes it extremely difficult to understand her in the workouts that require the user to 'write the words/phrases you hear.' The worst is in the workout that starts out with one or two words then progresses into full sentences. There are 3 separate cases of this 'building' exercise within the workout. I have to look at the answer every time she uses a word containing the double L sound as she pronounces these words with a hard J instead of a ll (y) sound, not to mention running these words together. Maybe in the real world of Latin American Spanish this may happen (although my italki teacher pronounces the double L as a Y sound), but we are just learning here. I am in an elementary stage in the program where each word should be enunciated properly. It's not about the speed, it's about the pronunciation that should count here. I have begun to skip the previously mentioned workout completely because it is nearly impossible to understand what she is saying. These instances where this speaker uses a hard J sound rather than a ll (y) sound need to be re-recorded as it has created a great struggle where there was not one before the upgrade.

In the Spanish upgrade there is a female speaker who pronounces the double L sound like a hard J and is very difficult to understand. Instead of Llevar, the double L sounding like Y as in Yam, we get Jevar. Other examples are Jegar rather than Llegar, and ejos rather than ellos, and so on with each word with a double L. This makes it extremely difficult to understand her in the workouts that require the user to 'write the words/phrases you hear.' The worst is in the workout that starts out with one or two words then progresses into full sentences. There are 3 separate cases of this 'building' exercise within the workout. I have to look at the answer every time she uses a word containing the double L sound as she pronounces these words with a hard J instead of a ll (y) sound, not to mention running these words together. Maybe in the real world of Latin American Spanish this may happen (although my italki teacher pronounces the double L as a Y sound), but we are just learning here. I am in an elementary stage in the program where each word should be enunciated properly. It's not about the speed, it's about the pronunciation that should count here. I have begun to skip the previously mentioned workout completely because it is nearly impossible to understand what she is saying. These instances where this speaker uses a hard J sound rather than a ll (y) sound need to be re-recorded as it has created a great struggle where there was not one before the upgrade.

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ojosdeverdes
Scuba. I was using someone else, had to take a break, and now thinking about switching tutors. It's always good to have a recommendation so thanks for responding. I assume you are using Skype? They all seem to be using Skype.

Scuba. I was using someone else, had to take a break, and now thinking about switching tutors. It's always good to have a recommendation so thanks for responding. I assume you are using Skype? They all seem to be using Skype.

nettech1992
Living in Latin America, you hear many different pronunciations. Especially in the Caribbean. You hear the j or the y even when you're in different cities. You should learn to become familiar with all of the pronunciations. A great example is "Dominican Spanish"....WOOOO. Speak about tough. Even within the DR, go to the north coast and you'll hear people say polque instead of porque, you'll hear Como ta? where the es is implicit, Pa instead of para. It's great to learn all of the interesting differences because it makes you a more well-rounded speaker.

Living in Latin America, you hear many different pronunciations. Especially in the Caribbean. You hear the j or the y even when you're in different cities. You should learn to become familiar with all of the pronunciations. A great example is "Dominican Spanish"....WOOOO. Speak about tough. Even within the DR, go to the north coast and you'll hear people say polque instead of porque, you'll hear Como ta? where the es is implicit, Pa instead of para. It's great to learn all of the interesting differences because it makes you a more well-rounded speaker.

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Is there a rule on which to use where. The sentence is: ¿Va a Costa Rica de vacationes o por trabajo? Por trabajo instead of para trabajo. This might have been covered in the older version but when I went to the upgrade I backed up 5 sessions and don't remember it being covered. Thanks in advance.

Is there a rule on which to use where. The sentence is: ¿Va a Costa Rica de vacationes o por trabajo? Por trabajo instead of para trabajo. This might have been covered in the older version but when I went to the upgrade I backed up 5 sessions and don't remember it being covered. Thanks in advance.

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Dankazi
The reason you have to use "por" in this situation is... Because in a sentence like this one, you are having to explain "the reason you are having to do something". Is like saying -Im going to the store for my groceries- You will also have to use "por". "Voy a la tienda por mi despensa.

The reason you have to use "por" in this situation is... Because in a sentence like this one, you are having to explain "the reason you are having to do something". Is like saying -Im going to the store for my groceries- You will also have to use "por". "Voy a la tienda por mi despensa.

ScubaCPA
ojos - There is a good Spanish Butterfly video on YouTube that goes over this. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1UsHmPkUx_o It's 46 minutes long (one of her longest)! So that tells you how complicated of a subject it is.

ojos - There is a good Spanish Butterfly video on YouTube that goes over this. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1UsHmPkUx_o It's 46 minutes long (one of her longest)! So that tells you how complicated of a subject it is.

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I just downloaded the upgraded Spanish (LA) today. In the old version I learned that próximo means next, as in El mes próximo = Next month, or La semana próxima = Next week. In the upgraded version I learned that que viene means next, as in El mes que viene = next month, or La semana que viene = Next week. My question is, are both acceptable or is que viene more widely used? More importantly, going forward, if I run into similar differences in the coming sessions of the upgrade, are the new terms more widely accepted or "more correct", or are they interchangeable, just another way way of saying the same thing that is equally acceptable? I hope that made sense. Thanks in advance.

I just downloaded the upgraded Spanish (LA) today. In the old version I learned that próximo means next, as in El mes próximo = Next month, or La semana próxima = Next week. In the upgraded version I learned that que viene means next, as in El mes que viene = next month, or La semana que viene = Next week. My question is, are both acceptable or is que viene more widely used? More importantly, going forward, if I run into similar differences in the coming sessions of the upgrade, are the new terms more widely accepted or "more correct", or are they interchangeable, just another way way of saying the same thing that is equally acceptable? I hope that made sense. Thanks in advance.

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ojosdeverdes
@Fabrice. Thanks for that explanation. My experience with the upgrade so far is that it is overall more detailed and this is a great example.

@Fabrice. Thanks for that explanation. My experience with the upgrade so far is that it is overall more detailed and this is a great example.

Fabrice
They are interchangeable if you talk about the month that is coming after the current month. But you could use "próximo" in situations when the month is not the one coming after the current one. For example let's say we are in September, and you say "In January I will go to Mexico, and the following month I will travel to China". In this case you would say "En enero voy a viajar a México y el mes próximo viajaré a china". El mes que viene is only for the month following the current one.

They are interchangeable if you talk about the month that is coming after the current month. But you could use "próximo" in situations when the month is not the one coming after the current one. For example let's say we are in September, and you say "In January I will go to Mexico, and the following month I will travel to China". In this case you would say "En enero voy a viajar a México y el mes próximo viajaré a china". El mes que viene is only for the month following the current one.

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Fluenz makes a single product with 6 equal but separate "branches". In that regard it cannot be compared to Apple or any other company that makes a variety of products. My wish or hope for Fluenz is that any upgrade or improvement to their product would be accessible to all who have purchased and use the product. If they create an upgrade or improvement to that single product that only a special few can access, then I cannot in good conscience continue to use that product. This does not in any way infer that I resent Fluenz. I don't know how much more clear I can make my point of view.

Fluenz makes a single product with 6 equal but separate "branches". In that regard it cannot be compared to Apple or any other company that makes a variety of products. My wish or hope for Fluenz is that any upgrade or improvement to their product would be accessible to all who have purchased and use the product. If they create an upgrade or improvement to that single product that only a special few can access, then I cannot in good conscience continue to use that product. This does not in any way infer that I resent Fluenz. I don't know how much more clear I can make my point of view.

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Fluenz' attitude seems to lean toward exclusively, offering immersion trips to Antigua and Guatemala for the "special ones" who can afford it. They apparently believe that's a better idea than improving the program for all users. So this is where I get off.

Fluenz' attitude seems to lean toward exclusively, offering immersion trips to Antigua and Guatemala for the "special ones" who can afford it. They apparently believe that's a better idea than improving the program for all users. So this is where I get off.

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Ashoka Tano
disculpe? usted es muy confundido. Sonia e espanol fluenz es especial. dejamo!

disculpe? usted es muy confundido. Sonia e espanol fluenz es especial. dejamo!

Sonia Gil
Hi George. I wanted to share some of what we've been up to hoping you reconsider leaving the Commons. Less than a year ago we launched a complete rewrite of the Fluenz Spanish program which represented a considerable investment of time and money on our part. Every workout and every video was rewritten based on what we had learned in the prior eight years of feedback and of course, everything was rerecorded--every hour of video (believe me, it isn't easy to sit in the studio for days at a time), as well as more than 10,000 audio files and their corresponding written elements. And as soon as it was ready we gave it to every single customer who had ever purchased it going back to 2008, at no cost to you. This year we've re-recorded all of Fluenz French, soon to be available to every single user as well. And right now we're working day and night to complete the new Mandarin Chinese, which will be provided free of charge to every single person who ever purchased the original going back to February of 2007, more than 10 years ago. Another team is hard at work overhauling our mobile apps in order to keep up with the very fast moving world of iOS and Android. We think that Andy's help desk team is as responsive and fast as ever, if not better. This massive on-going investment made for customers that paid once is our definition of exclusivity. Once you join the small and tight-knit Fluenz family we work as hard as we can to provide the best platform in the world to learn languages. Fluenz Digital has always been the most expensive program in the market but we've never stopped working to deliver real value for that money. Now we're launching Fluenz Immersion with the same philosophy. It isn't an inexpensive program by any means but the feedback we've received from all participants who finished their cohorts is that the program met and mostly exceeded their initial expectations. Because we value every single Fluenz Digital and Fluenz Immersion client for whom we've created our exclusive community of serious language learners I hope you choose to continue participating in the Commons.

Hi George. I wanted to share some of what we've been up to hoping you reconsider leaving the Commons. Less than a year ago we launched a complete rewrite of the Fluenz Spanish program which represented a considerable investment of time and money on our part. Every workout and every video was rewritten based on what we had learned in the prior eight years of feedback and of course, everything was rerecorded--every hour of video (believe me, it isn't easy to sit in the studio for days at a time), as well as more than 10,000 audio files and their corresponding written elements. And as soon as it was ready we gave it to every single customer who had ever purchased it going back to 2008, at no cost to you. This year we've re-recorded all of Fluenz French, soon to be available to every single user as well. And right now we're working day and night to complete the new Mandarin Chinese, which will be provided free of charge to every single person who ever purchased the original going back to February of 2007, more than 10 years ago. Another team is hard at work overhauling our mobile apps in order to keep up with the very fast moving world of iOS and Android. We think that Andy's help desk team is as responsive and fast as ever, if not better. This massive on-going investment made for customers that paid once is our definition of exclusivity. Once you join the small and tight-knit Fluenz family we work as hard as we can to provide the best platform in the world to learn languages. Fluenz Digital has always been the most expensive program in the market but we've never stopped working to deliver real value for that money. Now we're launching Fluenz Immersion with the same philosophy. It isn't an inexpensive program by any means but the feedback we've received from all participants who finished their cohorts is that the program met and mostly exceeded their initial expectations. Because we value every single Fluenz Digital and Fluenz Immersion client for whom we've created our exclusive community of serious language learners I hope you choose to continue participating in the Commons.

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There has been some talk here about language exchanges; I think I started one of the posts myself. Maybe this is something Fluenz has considered or maybe not, but, as I was doing my lesson on Wednesday it occurred to me: how great would it be if Fluenz were to offer an option of – once a person reaches a certain level of proficiency – speaking with someone in their chosen language that is familiar with Fluenz? I remember at one point RS offered this but once I found Fluenz, RS was no longer an option for learning a new language for me. So, thinking out loud here, what if the user was offered the option to converse with – likely for a fee – a person who is, number 1, fluent in English, number 2, fluent in the user’s chosen language, and number 3 and the key element, is familiar with the Fluenz program? I can’t think of a better combination that would enable Fluenz users to excel exponentially short of living in a place where the user’s chosen language is the native language. Call it Fluenz Live. The tutors are great but a live conversation can go in any number of directions. Has Fluenz considered this? Would Fluenz consider this? This could be used via Skype, or other video means that allows the user to converse. What do you language learners think about this? What does Fluenz think? Please let me hear from you. Thank you for reading. Now let’s get busy becoming fluent in a second, third or forth language.

There has been some talk here about language exchanges; I think I started one of the posts myself. Maybe this is something Fluenz has considered or maybe not, but, as I was doing my lesson on Wednesday it occurred to me: how great would it be if Fluenz were to offer an option of – once a person reaches a certain level of proficiency – speaking with someone in their chosen language that is familiar with Fluenz? I remember at one point RS offered this but once I found Fluenz, RS was no longer an option for learning a new language for me. So, thinking out loud here, what if the user was offered the option to converse with – likely for a fee – a person who is, number 1, fluent in English, number 2, fluent in the user’s chosen language, and number 3 and the key element, is familiar with the Fluenz program? I can’t think of a better combination that would enable Fluenz users to excel exponentially short of living in a place where the user’s chosen language is the native language. Call it Fluenz Live. The tutors are great but a live conversation can go in any number of directions. Has Fluenz considered this? Would Fluenz consider this? This could be used via Skype, or other video means that allows the user to converse. What do you language learners think about this? What does Fluenz think? Please let me hear from you.
Thank you for reading. Now let’s get busy becoming fluent in a second, third or forth language.

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ojosdeverdes
It would seem to me that making a native speaker accessible in one's chosen language would serve many more Fluenz users. But I'm just one guy with an opinion. And that opinion is, given the opportunity, it is always better to serve the many than to serve the few.

It would seem to me that making a native speaker accessible in one's chosen language would serve many more Fluenz users. But I'm just one guy with an opinion. And that opinion is, given the opportunity, it is always better to serve the many than to serve the few.

andy@fluenz
I don't have all the details on why the decision was made, but my best guess is that there is already quite a bit of competition out there with this kind of service by companies such as iTalki and Rosetta Stone. Also, we have over 150k users and being a small company, it's much easier to keep things intimate with an intensive course for 10-12 users at a time.

I don't have all the details on why the decision was made, but my best guess is that there is already quite a bit of competition out there with this kind of service by companies such as iTalki and Rosetta Stone. Also, we have over 150k users and being a small company, it's much easier to keep things intimate with an intensive course for 10-12 users at a time.

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This question is unrelated to Fluenz so I hope it's ok. As a supplement to Fluenz I wanted to us a language exchange and chose italki. I paid for a 1 year subscription to Skype for my italki sessions. I set up my password, got a number and I think I'm ready to go. But when I log in to my Skype account, it asks me to buy credits. I thought the subscription price would cover me for a year. Do I need to buy credits to use it to take a lesson on italki? Gracias para todo.

This question is unrelated to Fluenz so I hope it's ok. As a supplement to Fluenz I wanted to us a language exchange and chose italki. I paid for a 1 year subscription to Skype for my italki sessions. I set up my password, got a number and I think I'm ready to go. But when I log in to my Skype account, it asks me to buy credits. I thought the subscription price would cover me for a year. Do I need to buy credits to use it to take a lesson on italki?
Gracias para todo.

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ojosdeverdes
@Frabice. Thank you.

@Frabice. Thank you.

Fabrice
I never had to pay anything to Skype to use it for Italki lessons. I think you pay Skype only if you want to use it for phone calls (i.e. not internet calls).

I never had to pay anything to Skype to use it for Italki lessons. I think you pay Skype only if you want to use it for phone calls (i.e. not internet calls).

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I was reading Sonia's blog regarding flashcards being revamped. I came away wondering if I've missed something. The online site I've been using is: https://flashcards.fluenz.com/index.html. This is the site I'm directed to when I click on Flashcards, listed under Learning Tools to the left below My Account. (I work on a Mac, don't know if that makes a difference). But at the end of Sonia's post she gives this site: fluenz.com/commons/apps/flashcards. When I try to visit that site I get a 404 Not Found message, and yes, I've tried using the common prefixes to no avail. Is/was there something going on with the flashcards? Thanks in advance.

I was reading Sonia's blog regarding flashcards being revamped. I came away wondering if I've missed something. The online site I've been using is: https://flashcards.fluenz.com/index.html. This is the site I'm directed to when I click on Flashcards, listed under Learning Tools to the left below My Account. (I work on a Mac, don't know if that makes a difference). But at the end of Sonia's post she gives this site: fluenz.com/commons/apps/flashcards. When I try to visit that site I get a 404 Not Found message, and yes, I've tried using the common prefixes to no avail. Is/was there something going on with the flashcards? Thanks in advance.

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ojosdeverdes
Thanks, Andy.

Thanks, Andy.

andy@fluenz
The post you mentioned may have been a bit older. The latest site for the flashcards is flashcards.fluenz.com

The post you mentioned may have been a bit older. The latest site for the flashcards is flashcards.fluenz.com

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Yes, I post a lot, and I thank all of you that have taken the time to respond. I have asked this question before in some form but I don't believe I ever received a definitive answer, so here goes: I'm close to the end of L1, (lesson 24) and still can't figure out why some verbs are used in their conjugated forms and others in their infinitive forms. If there's some formula at work, I'm not seeing it. If you've taken the lessons in level 1, you know what I'm referring to. A few examples: querer, ser, estar, hablar, among others all being used in their conjugated forms. Salir, pagar, comprar, comer, etc., all used in their infinitive forms. Is there a comprehensive answer to this question? It seems so random. Thank you.

Yes, I post a lot, and I thank all of you that have taken the time to respond. I have asked this question before in some form but I don't believe I ever received a definitive answer, so here goes: I'm close to the end of L1, (lesson 24) and still can't figure out why some verbs are used in their conjugated forms and others in their infinitive forms. If there's some formula at work, I'm not seeing it. If you've taken the lessons in level 1, you know what I'm referring to. A few examples: querer, ser, estar, hablar, among others all being used in their conjugated forms. Salir, pagar, comprar, comer, etc., all used in their infinitive forms. Is there a comprehensive answer to this question? It seems so random.
Thank you.

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Sonia Gil
Dennis is correct- any verb can be utilized conjugated or in the infinitive form depending on context. So for example you can say: She eats every morning. (in this case eats is conjugated). But you say: She likes TO eat every morning (in this case "likes" is conjugated, but "to eat" is in infinitive form). In Spanish we use verbs very much like English. You would never say "I to eat" in English, thus in Spanish you would never say "Yo comer".

Dennis is correct- any verb can be utilized conjugated or in the infinitive form depending on context. So for example you can say: She eats every morning. (in this case eats is conjugated). But you say: She likes TO eat every morning (in this case "likes" is conjugated, but "to eat" is in infinitive form). In Spanish we use verbs very much like English. You would never say "I to eat" in English, thus in Spanish you would never say "Yo comer".

DennisG
It's a matter of context. Any one of those verbs you mention could be used in either an infinitive or conjugated form, depending on what else is happening in the sentence. For example, in English we might say, "I am going to eat at the restaurant." Note that there are two verbs in the sentence: "am" (a conjugated form of "to be") and "to eat" (an infinitive). Translated into Spanish, the sentence would read "Voy a comer en el restaurante." "Voy" is the conjugated form of "ir," while "comer" is in its infinitive form. But, used in a different context, a conjugated verb might just as easily be used in its infinitive form. For example, the sentence "I eat food every day" would be translated to "Como comida todos los dias." Note that "comer" is conjugated in this example, while it was in its infinitive form in the previous one. A lot of verbs we learn in Spanish are used in their infinitive form when preceded in a sentence by "I am going ... to eat, to drink, to buy, to go, to do whatever." But when used without the preceding verb ("I am going ..."), we usually see the verbs conjugated, just as in English. Does this finally clarify the issue for you?

It's a matter of context. Any one of those verbs you mention could be used in either an infinitive or conjugated form, depending on what else is happening in the sentence. For example, in English we might say, "I am going to eat at the restaurant." Note that there are two verbs in the sentence: "am" (a conjugated form of "to be") and "to eat" (an infinitive). Translated into Spanish, the sentence would read "Voy a comer en el restaurante." "Voy" is the conjugated form of "ir," while "comer" is in its infinitive form.

But, used in a different context, a conjugated verb might just as easily be used in its infinitive form. For example, the sentence "I eat food every day" would be translated to "Como comida todos los dias." Note that "comer" is conjugated in this example, while it was in its infinitive form in the previous one. A lot of verbs we learn in Spanish are used in their infinitive form when preceded in a sentence by "I am going ... to eat, to drink, to buy, to go, to do whatever." But when used without the preceding verb ("I am going ..."), we usually see the verbs conjugated, just as in English.

Does this finally clarify the issue for you?

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