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nuzas1

Posts: 0
Falls Church, Virginia
United States
I am not sure where to post this, but it is more of feedback and not a question. As a beginner I feel the speed of the French speakers in part deux is a bit fast even in the slow mode. I know it is good to hear how native speakers sound, but sometimes I feel as if I get little value from listening since it is hard to pick up the subtleties. It seems like it is best to memorize the dialogue at the start so you already the conversations. If someone randomly said a line of the dialogue to me I would have no idea what they are saying without knowing what the previous line was. The writers may tried to keep the speed fast to keep the student really paying attention to the little differences because that is what real life is speaking the language, but feel I would learn more if it was slower. Maybe at a higher level to move up the speed. I still love the program but just want to give some constructive feedback

I am not sure where to post this, but it is more of feedback and not a question. As a beginner I feel the speed of the French speakers in part deux is a bit fast even in the slow mode. I know it is good to hear how native speakers sound, but sometimes I feel as if I get little value from listening since it is hard to pick up the subtleties. It seems like it is best to memorize the dialogue at the start so you already the conversations. If someone randomly said a line of the dialogue to me I would have no idea what they are saying without knowing what the previous line was. The writers may tried to keep the speed fast to keep the student really paying attention to the little differences because that is what real life is speaking the language, but feel I would learn more if it was slower. Maybe at a higher level to move up the speed. I still love the program but just want to give some constructive feedback

andy@fluenz
We sincerely appreciate the feedback. I can understand how you feel. I went through the same thing when learning French, but in retrospect, my frustration came from thinking that I only needed to play the phrase once and I should be able to understand, which isn't the case. Now when I learn, I listen to the phrases at least 5-10 times each and it helps tremendously. Keep in mind too that languages are not all the same frequency, so you need time to tune your ear to the frequency of French. Keep at it and you'll be surprised in a few weeks or months how much you'll be able to understand

We sincerely appreciate the feedback. I can understand how you feel. I went through the same thing when learning French, but in retrospect, my frustration came from thinking that I only needed to play the phrase once and I should be able to understand, which isn't the case. Now when I learn, I listen to the phrases at least 5-10 times each and it helps tremendously. Keep in mind too that languages are not all the same frequency, so you need time to tune your ear to the frequency of French. Keep at it and you'll be surprised in a few weeks or months how much you'll be able to understand

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I am interested in studying Portuguese but sort of concerned in how the next series of lessons will come out. From other posts it looks like there will eventually be Portuguese 1 through 5 but unknown to when 3, 4, and 5 will come out. As a business I understand 3,4, and 5 will come out when they will come out. I understand you want to put out a quality product and take your time instead of cranking out crap. I offer this as a suggestion and a question if I buy 1 and 2 could/will I get a discount for purchasing the rest of the series when they come out. I think some users may be holding out for the later ones to come out. Looking at the other packages it could cost 200$+ extra buying them in two groups 1 and 2 together with 3,4 and 5 together vice buying them all in one set

I am interested in studying Portuguese but sort of concerned in how the next series of lessons will come out. From other posts it looks like there will eventually be Portuguese 1 through 5 but unknown to when 3, 4, and 5 will come out. As a business I understand 3,4, and 5 will come out when they will come out. I understand you want to put out a quality product and take your time instead of cranking out crap. I offer this as a suggestion and a question if I buy 1 and 2 could/will I get a discount for purchasing the rest of the series when they come out. I think some users may be holding out for the later ones to come out. Looking at the other packages it could cost 200$+ extra buying them in two groups 1 and 2 together with 3,4 and 5 together vice buying them all in one set

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nuzas1
Awesome!!! Looking forward to it

Awesome!!! Looking forward to it

andy@fluenz
Yes you will get a discount for levels 3 and up when they come out. The email will be sent once they are released.

Yes you will get a discount for levels 3 and up when they come out. The email will be sent once they are released.

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Sonia, You talk about loving to learn multiple languages but what is the best way to learn several languages at the same time such as French and Spanish? How to you balance keeping up to speed with one language but not confuse it with another one you are learning which has a similar structure such as romance languages?

Sonia,

You talk about loving to learn multiple languages but what is the best way to learn several languages at the same time such as French and Spanish? How to you balance keeping up to speed with one language but not confuse it with another one you are learning which has a similar structure such as romance languages?

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mauz15
If the languages are related, I think it is better to stick to one language at a time. Build a strong foundation before trying to tackle another. I am learning French at the moment. My native language (Spanish) has some similarities, and since French also has a lot in common with English, (my second language) I am already feeling the languages ''fight'' in my head sometimes' when I try to learn new French vocabulary. I think you will get very confused trying to keep up with the differences of such similar languages; for instance, the genders of Spanish and French words are not always the same.

If the languages are related, I think it is better to stick to one language at a time. Build a strong foundation before trying to tackle another.

I am learning French at the moment. My native language (Spanish) has some similarities, and since French also has a lot in common with English, (my second language) I am already feeling the languages ''fight'' in my head sometimes' when I try to learn new French vocabulary. I think you will get very confused trying to keep up with the differences of such similar languages; for instance, the genders of Spanish and French words are not always the same.

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I've started to use French 1 and I've been pretty impressed. The workouts are not easy, but I feel like the material is sticking. I've tried other programs but I'm honestly the most impressed with Fluenz. My question is to anyone out there who has taken both formal French college/high school courses and Fluenz French to give a ball park value estimate between the two. For example is taking all five levels of Fluenz French the equivalent of taking a year or so of college French? Maybe more? Maybe less? Even if Fluenz only covers a semester of college work, a 3 credit college course would cost about 500 to 600$ as a ballpark guess. All five sections of Fluenz cost 348$ so even low balling the estimate puts Fluenz at a higher value. Also Fluenz can be taken on your own schedule upping its value. I've taken no college language courses nor finished Fluenz so it is unknown to extent of how material is covered in either one. This question can also be extended to any of the languages Fluenz provides.

I've started to use French 1 and I've been pretty impressed. The workouts are not easy, but I feel like the material is sticking. I've tried other programs but I'm honestly the most impressed with Fluenz. My question is to anyone out there who has taken both formal French college/high school courses and Fluenz French to give a ball park value estimate between the two. For example is taking all five levels of Fluenz French the equivalent of taking a year or so of college French? Maybe more? Maybe less? Even if Fluenz only covers a semester of college work, a 3 credit college course would cost about 500 to 600$ as a ballpark guess. All five sections of Fluenz cost 348$ so even low balling the estimate puts Fluenz at a higher value. Also Fluenz can be taken on your own schedule upping its value. I've taken no college language courses nor finished Fluenz so it is unknown to extent of how material is covered in either one. This question can also be extended to any of the languages Fluenz provides.

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Mike W
I have used many different resources in my study of the French language. Of all the things I have used Fluenz is absolutely the best single resource. Taking a college course versus Fluenz are very different experiences. Fluenz in my opinion teaches you how to communicate in French or whatever you chosen language is. Taking a class is much more structured. So lets say a complete beginner spending a month with Fluenz is likely to have the ability to communicate with more variety. While a college student putting in the same effort is likely to know more French but perhaps may not have as much diversity in their French as the Fluenz student. The advantage to being in the classroom is that the student gets much more opportunity to practice their French. It's much easier to place a "level" on college learning because again the lessons are more structured. Much more difficult to place a "level" on Fluenz learning as it is formally measured. In addition to my Fluenz training, I am also taking classes at Alliance Française. Those classes are formally structured in such a way for students to be able to pass the DELF tests. In June I am planning to take the DELF A1 test for French. If I pass that test I will have an officially recognized diploma that I have passed the beginning level of French. Future tests are measured, A2 = Advanced Beginner, B1 = Intermediate, B2 Advanced Intermediate, and so forth. There are requirements on the A1 test that are not taught in the Fluenz lessons, but at the same time there is some material taught in Fluenz that goes beyond the A1 level. The point is that the Fluenz education vs college or Alliance Française can't be measured the same way. I think that Fluenz provides an excellent foundation for language learning and the ability to communicate. Without Fluenz there is no way that I would have ever gotten to the level I am with French. In the real world I exchange emails with native French speakers every day, and I've had live conversations with French speaking people. None of that would ever have been possible without Fluenz for me.

I have used many different resources in my study of the French language. Of all the things I have used Fluenz is absolutely the best single resource. Taking a college course versus Fluenz are very different experiences. Fluenz in my opinion teaches you how to communicate in French or whatever you chosen language is. Taking a class is much more structured. So lets say a complete beginner spending a month with Fluenz is likely to have the ability to communicate with more variety. While a college student putting in the same effort is likely to know more French but perhaps may not have as much diversity in their French as the Fluenz student. The advantage to being in the classroom is that the student gets much more opportunity to practice their French.

It's much easier to place a "level" on college learning because again the lessons are more structured. Much more difficult to place a "level" on Fluenz learning as it is formally measured. In addition to my Fluenz training, I am also taking classes at Alliance Française. Those classes are formally structured in such a way for students to be able to pass the DELF tests. In June I am planning to take the DELF A1 test for French. If I pass that test I will have an officially recognized diploma that I have passed the beginning level of French. Future tests are measured, A2 = Advanced Beginner, B1 = Intermediate, B2 Advanced Intermediate, and so forth.

There are requirements on the A1 test that are not taught in the Fluenz lessons, but at the same time there is some material taught in Fluenz that goes beyond the A1 level. The point is that the Fluenz education vs college or Alliance Française can't be measured the same way. I think that Fluenz provides an excellent foundation for language learning and the ability to communicate. Without Fluenz there is no way that I would have ever gotten to the level I am with French. In the real world I exchange emails with native French speakers every day, and I've had live conversations with French speaking people. None of that would ever have been possible without Fluenz for me.

nuzas1
Thanks guys for the insight! I'm looking forward to learning more and hope the company expands to include more languages and higher levels of the ones they already offer.

Thanks guys for the insight! I'm looking forward to learning more and hope the company expands to include more languages and higher levels of the ones they already offer.

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