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Magicboots

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Camblesforth, Selby
I thought I had Sapere (knowledge & info) and Conoscere (people & places) understood, until I reached Fluent 3 Part 29. This phrase comes up, non la conosco, tu sai chi è? Why do use conoscere for me knowing her, but sapere when asking someone if they know her. I know the phrase is asking the person if they know information, but surely the information I am asking for is about a person, so why is it not; non la conosco, la conosci ? Anyone else struggling with this, or explain why ?

I thought I had Sapere (knowledge & info) and Conoscere (people & places) understood, until I reached Fluent 3 Part 29.

This phrase comes up,

non la conosco, tu sai chi è?

Why do use conoscere for me knowing her, but sapere when asking someone if they know her. I know the phrase is asking the person if they know information, but surely the information I am asking for is about a person, so why is it not;

non la conosco, la conosci ?

Anyone else struggling with this, or explain why ?

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Fabrice
You could have used conoscere to mean have you already met her, but here they ask if the person has the knowledge of who she is, not if she knows her already, if he's acquainted with her. An easy way to figure out if you can use "sapere" is to change "to know" by "to have the knowlege (of)". For example: Do you know who she is? can use sapere, because "do you have the knowledge (of) who she is" is possible to say. Do you know at what time is the next train? can use sapere because "do you have the knowledge (of) what time is the next train" works. Do you know my son? cannot use sapere because "do you have the knowledge (of) my son" sounds weird and doesn't mean do you know my son. Do you know Peter? cannot use sapere because "do you have the knowledge (of) peter" sounds weird and doesn't mean do you know Peter. You use sapere after "to know" + question words like who, how, when, why.. If you cannot use sapere, then use conoscere. There are a few times when you can use both, but the general rule is what I explained. I hope it helps!

You could have used conoscere to mean have you already met her, but here they ask if the person has the knowledge of who she is, not if she knows her already, if he's acquainted with her.

An easy way to figure out if you can use "sapere" is to change "to know" by "to have the knowlege (of)". For example:

Do you know who she is? can use sapere, because "do you have the knowledge (of) who she is" is possible to say.
Do you know at what time is the next train? can use sapere because "do you have the knowledge (of) what time is the next train" works.
Do you know my son? cannot use sapere because "do you have the knowledge (of) my son" sounds weird and doesn't mean do you know my son.
Do you know Peter? cannot use sapere because "do you have the knowledge (of) peter" sounds weird and doesn't mean do you know Peter.

You use sapere after "to know" + question words like who, how, when, why..

If you cannot use sapere, then use conoscere.

There are a few times when you can use both, but the general rule is what I explained. I hope it helps!

Apolonia D.
Hi Magicboots, Fabrice's explanation is very good. Just wanted to add that, in general, when you can replace "to know" with "to be familiar/be acquainted with", then it's "conoscere" in Italian. You can use this tip and Fabrice's when you have to choose between "sapere" and "conoscere" and you'll get it right. Hope this helps!

Hi Magicboots, Fabrice's explanation is very good. Just wanted to add that, in general, when you can replace "to know" with "to be familiar/be acquainted with", then it's "conoscere" in Italian. You can use this tip and Fabrice's when you have to choose between "sapere" and "conoscere" and you'll get it right. Hope this helps!

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