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lharr1963

Posts: 0
Fairport, New York
I have a question about one of the exercises. In Match the words the phrase is "ist das die Nummer des Studenten" and the answer is "Is that the Student's(m) number" So, I know this is the genitive. If we are talking about male students (plural) isn't it die Studenten so shouldn't it be der Studenten for the genitive case and not des Studenten?

I have a question about one of the exercises. In Match the words the phrase is "ist das die Nummer des Studenten" and the answer is "Is that the Student's(m) number" So, I know this is the genitive. If we are talking about male students (plural) isn't it die Studenten so shouldn't it be der Studenten for the genitive case and not des Studenten?

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lharr1963
Thank you Emilie, yes, confusing, I will review session 9. I do see in my notes for that session that I wrote something about this, but it has not sunk in yet I guess. Thanks again

Thank you Emilie, yes, confusing, I will review session 9. I do see in my notes for that session that I wrote something about this, but it has not sunk in yet I guess. Thanks again

Emilie Poyet
Hi Iharr1963, you're right that it can be confusing here because of the 's end the EN at the end of Student, yet here the phrase is about one male student (singular), which is why the article is "des". The 's in English is used to mark the possessive here, not the plural And the "en" at the end of "Student" in German is here because Student is part of a special group of masculine nouns that we call "weak masculines" in German grammar. All these nouns, like der Student, der Name, der Kollege etc take on a final EN in any case but the Nominative case (subject). if you want to review them you can go back to the tutorial of German 4 session 9. If we were referring to several students though, you're right that the phrase would be: Ist das die Nummer der Studenten? /Is that the students'(p/m) number? Hope this helps!

Hi Iharr1963, you're right that it can be confusing here because of the 's end the EN at the end of Student, yet here the phrase is about one male student (singular), which is why the article is "des".
The 's in English is used to mark the possessive here, not the plural
And the "en" at the end of "Student" in German is here because Student is part of a special group of masculine nouns that we call "weak masculines" in German grammar. All these nouns, like der Student, der Name, der Kollege etc take on a final EN in any case but the Nominative case (subject).
if you want to review them you can go back to the tutorial of German 4 session 9.
If we were referring to several students though, you're right that the phrase would be: Ist das die Nummer der Studenten? /Is that the students'(p/m) number?
Hope this helps!

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I'm not sure how to ask this question or clarification. I am on level 3 and so far we are using die, das and der for things when we say something like "It is small". If "it" is, for example, something masculine to say "Der ist klein". I am also taking a German class, taught by a native German, and we have been told to say "Er ist klein" using er, sie or es for whatever the gender is of the "thing". I kind of suggested to her how I am learning it in Fluenz and she said that was not correct. Am I misunderstanding something?

I'm not sure how to ask this question or clarification. I am on level 3 and so far we are using die, das and der for things when we say something like "It is small". If "it" is, for example, something masculine to say "Der ist klein". I am also taking a German class, taught by a native German, and we have been told to say "Er ist klein" using er, sie or es for whatever the gender is of the "thing". I kind of suggested to her how I am learning it in Fluenz and she said that was not correct. Am I misunderstanding something?

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Emilie Poyet
It is true that in casual, spoken German people commonly use the pronouns Er, Sie and Es to refer to things, depending on their gender. However using Der, Die and Das is also perfectly correct and very common. Since it is so hard to keep up with all types of articles and pronouns in German at first, we chose to teach these forms first in the program to avoid confusions, then later on we mention the possibility to use either these or the personal pronouns.

It is true that in casual, spoken German people commonly use the pronouns Er, Sie and Es to refer to things, depending on their gender. However using Der, Die and Das is also perfectly correct and very common. Since it is so hard to keep up with all types of articles and pronouns in German at first, we chose to teach these forms first in the program to avoid confusions, then later on we mention the possibility to use either these or the personal pronouns.

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In Level 3, Lesson 8, the workout sentence is "Are they expensive" - (tickets) and the German shows as "Sind die teuer". Why is that? I thought it would be "Sind sie teuer". Is it because Tickets are plural and so you use die, I just thought it would be sie for "they". If you use "the tickets", it would be Sind die Karten teuer, so is it just the same idea, just not saying the word tickets? It just sounds awkward to say Sind die teuer.

In Level 3, Lesson 8, the workout sentence is "Are they expensive" - (tickets) and the German shows as "Sind die teuer". Why is that? I thought it would be "Sind sie teuer". Is it because Tickets are plural and so you use die, I just thought it would be sie for "they". If you use "the tickets", it would be Sind die Karten teuer, so is it just the same idea, just not saying the word tickets? It just sounds awkward to say Sind die teuer.

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astriz00
This is essentially a translation from: Are those expensive ...

This is essentially a translation from: Are those expensive ...

Emilie Poyet
Even though it sounds strange from an English perspective, that's the most correct form in German, although here both "sie" and "die" would be fine to use.

Even though it sounds strange from an English perspective, that's the most correct form in German, although here both "sie" and "die" would be fine to use.

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