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Lancent

Posts: 0
Benicia, California
In the Match the Words exercise, there is an entry that says "Tu as les clés? Oui, je les ai prises." It's been a while since I studied (and I started studying another language), so I got a little rusty. However, the word 'prises' seems odd. Can someone explain it to me. Thanks in advance

In the Match the Words exercise, there is an entry that says "Tu as les clés? Oui, je les ai prises." It's been a while since I studied (and I started studying another language), so I got a little rusty. However, the word 'prises' seems odd. Can someone explain it to me.

Thanks in advance

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andy@fluenz
If it were one key you would say "Je l'ai prise", but since it's plural+feminine, it becomes "Je les ai prises". Hope this helps.

If it were one key you would say "Je l'ai prise", but since it's plural+feminine, it becomes "Je les ai prises". Hope this helps.

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In 'Write the Word You Read', A (piece of) cloth = un vêtement. Is that correct. Or should it have been a piece of clothing?

In 'Write the Word You Read', A (piece of) cloth = un vêtement. Is that correct. Or should it have been a piece of clothing?

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Emilie Poyet
You're totally right Lancent, it does mean " a piece of clothing", we'll fix this typo in the next update, thanks for pointing it out!

You're totally right Lancent, it does mean " a piece of clothing", we'll fix this typo in the next update, thanks for pointing it out!

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In the "Write the Phrase You Read" exercise French 3 Session 8, the English given is "At what time are you going to have breakfast?" The answer given is: "Vous allez déjeuner à quelle heure?" But, doesn't 'déjeuner' mean 'to have lunch'? And breakfast is 'petit-déjeuner'? I typed the english sentence into Google Translate and they gave: "A quelle heure allez-vous prendre votre petit-déjeuner?". That's the same answer that I came up with. So, is this an error in the program, or is it a common practice to sometimes use 'déjeuner' for breakfast?

In the "Write the Phrase You Read" exercise French 3 Session 8, the English given is "At what time are you going to have breakfast?"

The answer given is: "Vous allez déjeuner à quelle heure?" But, doesn't 'déjeuner' mean 'to have lunch'? And breakfast is 'petit-déjeuner'?

I typed the english sentence into Google Translate and they gave: "A quelle heure allez-vous prendre votre petit-déjeuner?". That's the same answer that I came up with.

So, is this an error in the program, or is it a common practice to sometimes use 'déjeuner' for breakfast?

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Ron Stafford
Probably an error IMO if sticking to the way it was taught in the program. As a side note, when I worked in Montreal, they called breakfast 'déjeuner', and called lunch 'dîner'. There they told me that petit-déjeuner was more of a France thing :). I do seem to recall petit-déjeuner being used for breakfast on my only trip to Paris. The only other difference I can think of for your example is that petit-déjeuner is not really a verb, but rather a noun (???), whereas déjeuner can be both. Maybe others with more experience have a better answer.

Probably an error IMO if sticking to the way it was taught in the program. As a side note, when I worked in Montreal, they called breakfast 'déjeuner', and called lunch 'dîner'. There they told me that petit-déjeuner was more of a France thing :). I do seem to recall petit-déjeuner being used for breakfast on my only trip to Paris. The only other difference I can think of for your example is that petit-déjeuner is not really a verb, but rather a noun (???), whereas déjeuner can be both. Maybe others with more experience have a better answer.

andy@fluenz
The noun is "petit-déjeuner" and the verb is "déjeuner". A better way to phrase it though would be "Vous allez prendre le petit-déjeuner à quelle heure"? or "À quelle heure est-ce que vous aller prendre le petit-déjeuner".

The noun is "petit-déjeuner" and the verb is "déjeuner". A better way to phrase it though would be "Vous allez prendre le petit-déjeuner à quelle heure"? or "À quelle heure est-ce que vous aller prendre le petit-déjeuner".

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Hi, could anyone advise me on whether it would be worthwhile from both a time as well as financial stand-point to study European (Spain) Spanish since I'm already intermediate in Latin American Spanish. I'm going to be in various areas in Spain for about 1 week in October, and plan on going for about 2 weeks next year. So, is there enough similarity between LA Spanish and SP Spanish to get by, or would it be worthwhile to study specifically for Spain. As background, I've finished both Rosetta Stone 1-5 and Fluenz 1-5. I'm now over 2/3 of the way through Fluencia. Rosetta Stone was good, but subjunctive was too confusing. That's why I tried Fluenz. Unfortunately, it wasn't until almost finished level 5 that I found out there was no coverage at all, because it would be too confusing. Fluencia does cover subjunctive, but I haven't gotten to that point yet.

Hi, could anyone advise me on whether it would be worthwhile from both a time as well as financial stand-point to study European (Spain) Spanish since I'm already intermediate in Latin American Spanish. I'm going to be in various areas in Spain for about 1 week in October, and plan on going for about 2 weeks next year. So, is there enough similarity between LA Spanish and SP Spanish to get by, or would it be worthwhile to study specifically for Spain.

As background, I've finished both Rosetta Stone 1-5 and Fluenz 1-5. I'm now over 2/3 of the way through Fluencia. Rosetta Stone was good, but subjunctive was too confusing. That's why I tried Fluenz. Unfortunately, it wasn't until almost finished level 5 that I found out there was no coverage at all, because it would be too confusing. Fluencia does cover subjunctive, but I haven't gotten to that point yet.

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Lancent
Hi Brian, I also have done Rosetta Stone first, and I also found it to be helpful to do it in that order. As you say, it has a much broader vocabulary, and then when I do Fluenz it seems easy by comparison. Also, the voice recognition on RS helps a lot. Where Fluenz shines is with getting some actual dialogue. After RS I "knew" a lot of the language, but had trouble putting it into practice. I actually like that combination enough that I'm currently studying French up to level 5 on RS, and just started Fluenz level 2. Again, that order seems to work well.

Hi Brian, I also have done Rosetta Stone first, and I also found it to be helpful to do it in that order. As you say, it has a much broader vocabulary, and then when I do Fluenz it seems easy by comparison. Also, the voice recognition on RS helps a lot. Where Fluenz shines is with getting some actual dialogue. After RS I "knew" a lot of the language, but had trouble putting it into practice.

I actually like that combination enough that I'm currently studying French up to level 5 on RS, and just started Fluenz level 2. Again, that order seems to work well.

Apolonia D.
Hi Lancent, I don't think it's necessary to study Spanish from Spain, you'll be fine. You'll find that some words are different, like "computadora" and "auto" for example, which in Spain are called "ordenador" and "coche" (but they will still understand "computadora" and "auto"). So you'll be understood and you'll be able to communicate. The pronunciation of some letters is different in Spain though, so you might want to read something about the main differences between LA and Spain Spanish and maybe watch some TV shows from Spain so that your ear get used to the different sounds.

Hi Lancent, I don't think it's necessary to study Spanish from Spain, you'll be fine. You'll find that some words are different, like "computadora" and "auto" for example, which in Spain are called "ordenador" and "coche" (but they will still understand "computadora" and "auto"). So you'll be understood and you'll be able to communicate. The pronunciation of some letters is different in Spain though, so you might want to read something about the main differences between LA and Spain Spanish and maybe watch some TV shows from Spain so that your ear get used to the different sounds.

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The 3rd programming suggestion that I have deals with the Match the Phrases exercise. You have to drag the space containing the Spanish sentence onto the correct sentence on the left. This can be a little frustrating as the often don't take unless the 2 rectanges are lined up a bit better. This is especially true for someone who is not very facile with a touch pad, but trying. For this exercise I would suggest changing it so that the student can click on the sentence on the left side of the screen. This would select that sentence, and the student would then have to click on the correct English translation on the left. Two clicks is lot easier than one click-and-drag.

The 3rd programming suggestion that I have deals with the Match the Phrases exercise. You have to drag the space containing the Spanish sentence onto the correct sentence on the left. This can be a little frustrating as the often don't take unless the 2 rectanges are lined up a bit better. This is especially true for someone who is not very facile with a touch pad, but trying.

For this exercise I would suggest changing it so that the student can click on the sentence on the left side of the screen. This would select that sentence, and the student would then have to click on the correct English translation on the left. Two clicks is lot easier than one click-and-drag.

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andy@fluenz
Thanks for your suggestions Lancent, we are always looking for feedback to improve the program.

Thanks for your suggestions Lancent, we are always looking for feedback to improve the program.

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The next issue regarding Fluenz has to do with exclamation symbols. Even in challenge mode most of the punctuation symbols (period & question mark) have no importance. If you omit a question mark or a period the program still accepts the written form (if otherwise correct). You can even put in the wrong punctuation mark, put in one where it's not needed, put one in the middle of the sentence, etc, and the program still accepts the written form. However, exclamation points (including the upside-down exclamation point at the beginning of the sentence) have to be put in, and at the proper location. Otherwise, Fluenz will count the entry as incorrect. The reason why this is important is because, of all the punctuation marks, the exclamation point should not be mandatory. The exclamation point represents the speaker or writer's giving high importance, urgency, emotion, etc, to the statement. There is no 100% guarantee that a particular word or phrase needs a guarantee. For instance "Vamos a bailar." and "¡Vamos a bailar!" are both correct. It's just that one is more emphatic than the other.

The next issue regarding Fluenz has to do with exclamation symbols. Even in challenge mode most of the punctuation symbols (period & question mark) have no importance. If you omit a question mark or a period the program still accepts the written form (if otherwise correct). You can even put in the wrong punctuation mark, put in one where it's not needed, put one in the middle of the sentence, etc, and the program still accepts the written form. However, exclamation points (including the upside-down exclamation point at the beginning of the sentence) have to be put in, and at the proper location. Otherwise, Fluenz will count the entry as incorrect.

The reason why this is important is because, of all the punctuation marks, the exclamation point should not be mandatory. The exclamation point represents the speaker or writer's giving high importance, urgency, emotion, etc, to the statement. There is no 100% guarantee that a particular word or phrase needs a guarantee. For instance "Vamos a bailar." and "¡Vamos a bailar!" are both correct. It's just that one is more emphatic than the other.

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andy@fluenz
This is a glitch and we are working to correct it. The program should allow you to continue without the punctuation.

This is a glitch and we are working to correct it. The program should allow you to continue without the punctuation.

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Hi, I have some suggestions to improve the program. I don't want to bundle all the suggestions together since that might make the whole thing difficult to read, or cause some lesser exciting suggestion to get lost. Here is the first: #1: Challenge mode. As it is now, I have to turn on Challenge mode for each level. This is redundant. Further, even in the same lesson I have to turn Challenge mode on twice. The first time if at the first half of the level. Then, after the conversation exercises, the Challenge mode is turned off (by the Fluenz program). When I come to the later exercises I have to turn Challenge mode back on. My suggestion is to have a way for the student to turn Challenge mode on, and have it stay on, even for all future lessons. For instance, if I want Challenge mode for session 5, I'm most likely going to want it for session 6, session 7, and so on. Of course, I want to be able to turn Challenge mode off if I want.

Hi, I have some suggestions to improve the program. I don't want to bundle all the suggestions together since that might make the whole thing difficult to read, or cause some lesser exciting suggestion to get lost. Here is the first:

#1: Challenge mode. As it is now, I have to turn on Challenge mode for each level. This is redundant. Further, even in the same lesson I have to turn Challenge mode on twice. The first time if at the first half of the level. Then, after the conversation exercises, the Challenge mode is turned off (by the Fluenz program). When I come to the later exercises I have to turn Challenge mode back on.

My suggestion is to have a way for the student to turn Challenge mode on, and have it stay on, even for all future lessons. For instance, if I want Challenge mode for session 5, I'm most likely going to want it for session 6, session 7, and so on. Of course, I want to be able to turn Challenge mode off if I want.

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Jim2453
I agree with your suggestin on challenge mode. It seems that my iPad stays on challenge mode but the pc version does not.

I agree with your suggestin on challenge mode. It seems that my iPad stays on challenge mode but the pc version does not.

andy@fluenz
Hi Lancent, Thanks for the suggestion. I have passed it on to our developers for a future update. We hope you enjoy the program. Cheers, Andy

Hi Lancent,
Thanks for the suggestion. I have passed it on to our developers for a future update. We hope you enjoy the program.
Cheers,
Andy

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Where did (you(p)) go for your(p) last vacation? -- According to the Fluenz rules of pluralization, ít would seem that the the 'your(p)' should signify that it is talking about more than one person, and not to more than one vacations. It seems like the answer should be "¿Adónde fueron para su última vacación?" The question doesn't say that vacation is pluralized, but the answer has it this way. So, it seems that the question should actually be "Where did (you(p)) go for your last vacations?"

Where did (you(p)) go for your(p) last vacation? -- According to the Fluenz rules of pluralization, ít would seem that the the 'your(p)' should signify that it is talking about more than one person, and not to more than one vacations. It seems like the answer should be "¿Adónde fueron para su última vacación?" The question doesn't say that vacation is pluralized, but the answer has it this way. So, it seems that the question should actually be "Where did (you(p)) go for your last vacations?"

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Apolonia D.
Hi Lancent, in session 10, level 1, we teach that "The vacation = Las vacaciones" because this word is always used in the plural form in Spanish. So even though in English you can sometimes say "vacations" instead of "vacation", in Spanish you will always use the plural form "vacaciones": "Yo estoy de vacaciones = I am on vacation".

Hi Lancent, in session 10, level 1, we teach that "The vacation = Las vacaciones" because this word is always used in the plural form in Spanish. So even though in English you can sometimes say "vacations" instead of "vacation", in Spanish you will always use the plural form "vacaciones": "Yo estoy de vacaciones = I am on vacation".

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Exercise in Level 4, unit 10 translates "(I) had to take some medicine to feel better" to "Tuve que tomar unas medicinas para sentirme mejor." This sounds like they are taking some of more than one medicine. How do you differentiate taking some of more than one medicine (e.g., Tylenol + Sudafed + Benadryl)), as opposed to taking some of only one medication (e.g., Tylenol only)?

Exercise in Level 4, unit 10 translates "(I) had to take some medicine to feel better" to "Tuve que tomar unas medicinas para sentirme mejor."

This sounds like they are taking some of more than one medicine. How do you differentiate taking some of more than one medicine (e.g., Tylenol + Sudafed + Benadryl)), as opposed to taking some of only one medication (e.g., Tylenol only)?

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Lancent
Thanks

Thanks

Fabrice
Una = one. unas/unos = some, so una medicine = one medicine, and unas medicinas = some medicine.

Una = one. unas/unos = some, so una medicine = one medicine, and unas medicinas = some medicine.

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I'm at the first part of level 4, and I still don't have a firm understanding as to when "que" gets an accent mark or not. Can someone give a definitive guide as to "que" vs "qué". Thanks in advance.

I'm at the first part of level 4, and I still don't have a firm understanding as to when "que" gets an accent mark or not. Can someone give a definitive guide as to "que" vs "qué". Thanks in advance.

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Fabrice
If it's a question word, you use an accent. So "What do you do tomorrow?" Answer: "What I do every day": "¿Qué haces mañana?" answer; "Lo que hago todos los días".

If it's a question word, you use an accent. So "What do you do tomorrow?" Answer: "What I do every day": "¿Qué haces mañana?" answer; "Lo que hago todos los días".

Apolonia D.
Hi Lancent, like Fabrice said "qué" with an accent mark is used in direct questions, as in "¿Qué quiere?" and in indirect questions as well: "No sé qué quiere". It is also used in exclamations: "¡Qué rápido!". In this case it's translated as "How", "How fast!". "Que" without an accent mark usually means "that", as in "Creo que... = I think that..." or "La casa que está allá =The house that is there", although depending on context it can also mean "which" or "who": "El hombre que está allá = The man who is there".

Hi Lancent, like Fabrice said "qué" with an accent mark is used in direct questions, as in "¿Qué quiere?" and in indirect questions as well: "No sé qué quiere". It is also used in exclamations: "¡Qué rápido!". In this case it's translated as "How", "How fast!". "Que" without an accent mark usually means "that", as in "Creo que... = I think that..." or "La casa que está allá =The house that is there", although depending on context it can also mean "which" or "who": "El hombre que está allá = The man who is there".

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