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kpolitzer

Posts: 0
Portland, OR
Just wondering. I had purchased all five levels of German and wanted to buy another program; is there a sale once a year or something? Thanks.

Just wondering. I had purchased all five levels of German and wanted to buy another program; is there a sale once a year or something? Thanks.

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andy@fluenz
We have a big sale for Black Friday, Cyber Monday, and again just before Christmas. From time-to-time we have smaller sales.

We have a big sale for Black Friday, Cyber Monday, and again just before Christmas. From time-to-time we have smaller sales.

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Hi. The Fluenz online keeps logging me out of the lesson while I'm in the middle of it - not even idle! Any idea why? It's frustrating to be in the middle of an answer.

Hi. The Fluenz online keeps logging me out of the lesson while I'm in the middle of it - not even idle! Any idea why? It's frustrating to be in the middle of an answer.

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andy@fluenz
Do you share your ID with someone else that could be logging into another computer?

Do you share your ID with someone else that could be logging into another computer?

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Are there any plans to incorporate the simple past, imperative, and more constructions with the verb "werden" into the Fluenz program? I am very happy with what I am learning with the Fluenz program, but I find that when I take a look at grammar books, different aspects of the language are covered.

Are there any plans to incorporate the simple past, imperative, and more constructions with the verb "werden" into the Fluenz program?
I am very happy with what I am learning with the Fluenz program, but I find that when I take a look at grammar books, different aspects of the language are covered.

This question is unsolved
andy@fluenz
We don't have any plans to alter the material that is taught in the program at this time. Keep in mind that a lot of the tenses such as the simple past aren't used much in daily conversation. It's mostly used in literature and history style writings.

We don't have any plans to alter the material that is taught in the program at this time. Keep in mind that a lot of the tenses such as the simple past aren't used much in daily conversation. It's mostly used in literature and history style writings.

kpolitzer
Thanks Andy. I am now in Session 4, I see the past tenses of sein and haben. I'm just confused because they are referred to as being in the imperfect tense, while in other resources I have the tense is referred to as the preterite.

Thanks Andy. I am now in Session 4, I see the past tenses of sein and haben. I'm just confused because they are referred to as being in the imperfect tense, while in other resources I have the tense is referred to as the preterite.

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Hello. So I see we have to use the preposition "auf" with "warten" (to wait for). But when we buy something for someone, we have to use the preposition für, as in "für sie." When do we use "auf" and when do we use "für?"

Hello. So I see we have to use the preposition "auf" with "warten" (to wait for).

But when we buy something for someone, we have to use the preposition für, as in "für sie."

When do we use "auf" and when do we use "für?"

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Emilie Poyet
Most of the time, "for" translates as "für" in German: Für mich, einen Kaffee /For me, a coffee; Dieses Buch ist für Sonia /This book is for Sonia... Yet just like in English, in German after some verbs you have to use some specific prepositions, and they don't always match in English and German. That's the case for: Warten auf = To wait for. Auf doesn't really mean "for" but that's the preposition to use after "warten", always. You'll come across many other examples of that as you move along your German studies, my recommendation is to start a list of those verbs you'll have to memorize by heart regularly and practice them a lot!

Most of the time, "for" translates as "für" in German: Für mich, einen Kaffee /For me, a coffee; Dieses Buch ist für Sonia /This book is for Sonia...
Yet just like in English, in German after some verbs you have to use some specific prepositions, and they don't always match in English and German. That's the case for: Warten auf = To wait for.
Auf doesn't really mean "for" but that's the preposition to use after "warten", always.
You'll come across many other examples of that as you move along your German studies, my recommendation is to start a list of those verbs you'll have to memorize by heart regularly and practice them a lot!

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Are there any plans for Fluenz to add some tests on the gender of nouns? As we memorize different nouns, it's easy to forget if something is feminine, masculine, or neuter.

Are there any plans for Fluenz to add some tests on the gender of nouns? As we memorize different nouns, it's easy to forget if something is feminine, masculine, or neuter.

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andy@fluenz
We don't, however, that's a great idea. I'll pass it onto our developers for future ideas.

We don't, however, that's a great idea. I'll pass it onto our developers for future ideas.

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