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kdankesreiter

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I am currently on lesson 8 on the German 3 level and the lecture video cut off before finishing the explanation of the sentence, "Ich fliege denach nach Hause." I wasn't sure if anyone reported this yet, but wanted to bring it to the Fluenz team's attention. Edit: The video did explain a part of the sentence earlier, but it cut off so quickly I thought it might be a bug

I am currently on lesson 8 on the German 3 level and the lecture video cut off before finishing the explanation of the sentence, "Ich fliege denach nach Hause." I wasn't sure if anyone reported this yet, but wanted to bring it to the Fluenz team's attention.

Edit: The video did explain a part of the sentence earlier, but it cut off so quickly I thought it might be a bug

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andy@fluenz
Please send us an email to usersupport@fluenz.com and include the device you are using and we'll help troubleshoot further.

Please send us an email to usersupport@fluenz.com and include the device you are using and we'll help troubleshoot further.

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I have no idea how to understand the German cases. The way it is explained doesn't make much sense to me. I have taken German in High School and my teacher taught the same way Sonia does and nothing ever clicked. Just when I start understanding why a structure does this and why it is, it is suddenly skewed. My brain almost needs a rule of thumb to follow in order to understand. Does anyone have a way to remember how to tell between the cases that simply made more sense to them?

I have no idea how to understand the German cases. The way it is explained doesn't make much sense to me. I have taken German in High School and my teacher taught the same way Sonia does and nothing ever clicked. Just when I start understanding why a structure does this and why it is, it is suddenly skewed. My brain almost needs a rule of thumb to follow in order to understand. Does anyone have a way to remember how to tell between the cases that simply made more sense to them?

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jamesckel
It would be easier to answer specific questions because it is a rather large topic you touch upon. Most German grammar books have explanations, and you can easily find explanations online as well. Over simplifying, one can say that the subject of a sentence will be nominative case, the direct object accusative case, and the indirect object the dative case. But which case to use after prepositions, for instance, I find easier to learn through repetition. There is no "rule" to apply that is of much help, or else it's more work to learn when to apply rules than to just memorize. Viel Glück

It would be easier to answer specific questions because it is a rather large topic you touch upon. Most German grammar books have explanations, and you can easily find explanations online as well. Over simplifying, one can say that the subject of a sentence will be nominative case, the direct object accusative case, and the indirect object the dative case. But which case to use after prepositions, for instance, I find easier to learn through repetition. There is no "rule" to apply that is of much help, or else it's more work to learn when to apply rules than to just memorize.

Viel Glück

kpolitzer
As I (hopefully) understand it: The nominative, or subject, form is the simplest to learn. The accusative and dative get very tricky with the prepositions. But, in at least many cases, the accusative case handles direct objects (and directions), the dative case handles indirect objects (and locations), and the genitive deals with the possessive. So: the bread (the word "the" is nominative) das Brot I eat the bread ("I' is the subject, while the bread is the direct object, so you use the accusative) Ich esse das Brot I give the bread to you ("I" is the subject, "to you" uses the dative because it's an indirect object, and "the bread" once again is the direct object Ich gebe dir das Brot I give you the bread of the bakery ("of the bakery" uses the genitive) Ich gebe dir das Brot der Backerei If this is confusing or incorrect, someone please correct me!

As I (hopefully) understand it:

The nominative, or subject, form is the simplest to learn.
The accusative and dative get very tricky with the prepositions. But, in at least many cases, the accusative case handles direct objects (and directions), the dative case handles indirect objects (and locations), and the genitive deals with the possessive.

So:
the bread (the word "the" is nominative) das Brot
I eat the bread ("I' is the subject, while the bread is the direct object, so you use the accusative) Ich esse das Brot
I give the bread to you ("I" is the subject, "to you" uses the dative because it's an indirect object, and "the bread" once again is the direct object
Ich gebe dir das Brot
I give you the bread of the bakery ("of the bakery" uses the genitive) Ich gebe dir das Brot der Backerei

If this is confusing or incorrect, someone please correct me!

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I've just started up the new school year and need a bit of a refresher for German. When it comes to say dieses and ein, when does one use an "-n" ending?I need a review and the instructor covers the lessons well, so I was hoping I could get some direction as to which lessons include this aspect of German.

I've just started up the new school year and need a bit of a refresher for German. When it comes to say dieses and ein, when does one use an "-n" ending?I need a review and the instructor covers the lessons well, so I was hoping I could get some direction as to which lessons include this aspect of German.

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meshmess
I think I've just finished the lesson you're referring to. It's German 1 - Lesson 8, "Buying things at the kiosk."

I think I've just finished the lesson you're referring to. It's German 1 - Lesson 8, "Buying things at the kiosk."

Emilie Poyet
Hi kdankesreiter, We do start explaining why and how to use -n endings on articles in German 1 session 8, and then keep working on it all through the level(s) since it is a crucial case that you'll hear and use all the time (it is called the "accusative" case, used with words that are the objects of a phrase). Good luck with the new school year!

Hi kdankesreiter,
We do start explaining why and how to use -n endings on articles in German 1 session 8, and then keep working on it all through the level(s) since it is a crucial case that you'll hear and use all the time (it is called the "accusative" case, used with words that are the objects of a phrase).
Good luck with the new school year!

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I just completed 1/3 of the German two program of Fluenz and was curious as to how much German I actually know, and decided to test it out. If anyone was interested in doing the same, you can look up German newspapers and try to piece together the article using words you already know. http://www.abendzeitung-muenchen.de/muenchen <-- This source had many familiar words in the current articles and I got a good idea of what they were about.

I just completed 1/3 of the German two program of Fluenz and was curious as to how much German I actually know, and decided to test it out. If anyone was interested in doing the same, you can look up German newspapers and try to piece together the article using words you already know. http://www.abendzeitung-muenchen.de/muenchen <-- This source had many familiar words in the current articles and I got a good idea of what they were about.

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I've loved the Fluenz experience thus far, but currently having some issues.I am unsure if it is on the Fluenz end or on my end, as I use Fluenze through my school, but I figured I should inform you anyway just in case. When I log into the program, it appears fine. But when I log in the loading screen will flash and stay on the screen, not allowing me to exit or minimize the screen and not taking me to my sessions either. I really don't want my memory of what I've learned to start slipping so I've been reviewing with the flashcards and can access the commons without issue. Thank you for your time, I hope I can get the issue figured out wheter it be on my end or yours.

I've loved the Fluenz experience thus far, but currently having some issues.I am unsure if it is on the Fluenz end or on my end, as I use Fluenze through my school, but I figured I should inform you anyway just in case. When I log into the program, it appears fine. But when I log in the loading screen will flash and stay on the screen, not allowing me to exit or minimize the screen and not taking me to my sessions either. I really don't want my memory of what I've learned to start slipping so I've been reviewing with the flashcards and can access the commons without issue. Thank you for your time, I hope I can get the issue figured out wheter it be on my end or yours.

This question is unsolved
andy@fluenz
Please send us an email at usersupport@fluenz.com and we'll help troubleshoot further.

Please send us an email at usersupport@fluenz.com and we'll help troubleshoot further.

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I am so far having a great experience with Fluenz German, but I was wondering where I can find more information on German culture. Sometimes, Sonia does give very helpful insights at the beginning and ends of the video, for example if you are at a loss for words say "ay" instead of "um" as um is a preposition in German, but I was wondering where I could find other small tips such as this.

I am so far having a great experience with Fluenz German, but I was wondering where I can find more information on German culture. Sometimes, Sonia does give very helpful insights at the beginning and ends of the video, for example if you are at a loss for words say "ay" instead of "um" as um is a preposition in German, but I was wondering where I could find other small tips such as this.

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ChrJen
I suggest you go on youtube. I follow two German ladies who have helped me understand German in addition with Fluenz of course. German with Jenny is one and learn German with Anja. I hope they help you like they have for me.

I suggest you go on youtube. I follow two German ladies who have helped me understand German in addition with Fluenz of course. German with Jenny is one and learn German with Anja. I hope they help you like they have for me.

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I have taken two years of German in high school and then continued my learning with Fluenz German, so many of the first sessions were easy and I could comprehend them well. But as I get into the higher words and more complicated structures, I'm realizing I'm having much more difficulty with real-time spoken German like in the workouts. I was wondering if anyone had some suggestions to help comprehension other than just repeating the workouts until I get it. I've tried watching German children's shows but the language is spoken in real time and can sometimes sound like a jumbled mess. Thank you ahead of time.

I have taken two years of German in high school and then continued my learning with Fluenz German, so many of the first sessions were easy and I could comprehend them well. But as I get into the higher words and more complicated structures, I'm realizing I'm having much more difficulty with real-time spoken German like in the workouts. I was wondering if anyone had some suggestions to help comprehension other than just repeating the workouts until I get it. I've tried watching German children's shows but the language is spoken in real time and can sometimes sound like a jumbled mess. Thank you ahead of time.

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Brody3977
Here's a link good German TV show uploaded to Youtube called Extra. It was made to my understanding to help people learn German. We watched it in my high school German. It's a whole series so make sure you watch it all and write down my memorize new words. Hope it helps! https://youtu.be/yhP3OT2hxAE

Here's a link good German TV show uploaded to Youtube called Extra. It was made to my understanding to help people learn German. We watched it in my high school German. It's a whole series so make sure you watch it all and write down my memorize new words. Hope it helps!

https://youtu.be/yhP3OT2hxAE

Bennettsellers
Sometimes writing down the sentences or words helps you to better understand the material. ;)

Sometimes writing down the sentences or words helps you to better understand the material. ;)

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Hello! I was just on the flashcards page and the flashcard menu does not allow me to choose which form I would like the cards in. Is this option not available in German, or is this a tech issue? If it is a tech issue, is there a fix available?

Hello! I was just on the flashcards page and the flashcard menu does not allow me to choose which form I would like the cards in. Is this option not available in German, or is this a tech issue? If it is a tech issue, is there a fix available?

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andy@fluenz
Hi everyone, This is a tech issue on our end and we are working to correct it. We're very sorry for the inconvenience. I'll post here as soon as it has been resolved. Since it's working for quite a few users without issue, I recommend that you clear your browser's cache and try again to be sure that isn't the issue though. Thanks, Andy

Hi everyone, This is a tech issue on our end and we are working to correct it. We're very sorry for the inconvenience. I'll post here as soon as it has been resolved. Since it's working for quite a few users without issue, I recommend that you clear your browser's cache and try again to be sure that isn't the issue though. Thanks, Andy

kdankesreiter
Thank You!

Thank You!

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I am going through the Fluenz German Program and came to an issue that I don't quite understand. "Welchen Schirm möchten Sie kaufen? Diesen?" is the example sentence I will use. "Welchen" has the "-en" ending as there is both a direct object and a subject in the sentence. That I understand. "Diesen," on the other hand, I have seen with both the "-en" and "-er" ending and was wondering why. What part of the sentence causes this change to the "Diese" that follows?

I am going through the Fluenz German Program and came to an issue that I don't quite understand.
"Welchen Schirm möchten Sie kaufen? Diesen?" is the example sentence I will use. "Welchen" has the "-en" ending as there is both a direct object and a subject in the sentence. That I understand. "Diesen," on the other hand, I have seen with both the "-en" and "-er" ending and was wondering why. What part of the sentence causes this change to the "Diese" that follows?

This question is unsolved
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