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Jafo

Posts: 0
Boonville, NY
I am having a hard time knowing when Ihre means her or their. In one of the workouts you have: Ihre Taschen and Ihre Flüge. The first means her bags and the second means their flights. How do you distinguish the two?

I am having a hard time knowing when Ihre means her or their. In one of the workouts you have:

Ihre Taschen and Ihre Flüge. The first means her bags and the second means their flights. How do you distinguish the two?

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There is a typo in the match phrases of this section (German 2, section 17): "Müssen wir Bier mibringen?" Instead of "Müssen wir Bier mitbringen?"

There is a typo in the match phrases of this section (German 2, section 17):

"Müssen wir Bier mibringen?"

Instead of

"Müssen wir Bier mitbringen?"

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Emilie Poyet
Thank you so much for reporting Jafo, we'll make sure to fix this typo in our next update

Thank you so much for reporting Jafo, we'll make sure to fix this typo in our next update

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I don't know if any of you noticed, but if you have an Amazon Alexa (Echo), you can change it to speak German. It is helping me! Also, in English mode, you can ask it how to say words in German. Just another tool to help you along. :)

I don't know if any of you noticed, but if you have an Amazon Alexa (Echo), you can change it to speak German. It is helping me!

Also, in English mode, you can ask it how to say words in German. Just another tool to help you along. :)

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Fabrice
same in chinese: "alexa, how to you say I want to go eat in chinese" ? and it tells me :)

same in chinese: "alexa, how to you say I want to go eat in chinese" ? and it tells me :)

Jafo
Yes, it understands me fine. :)

Yes, it understands me fine. :)

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Why are we taught not using the literal translation? Example: "möchten sie zum supermarkt gehen?" is translated to "do you want to go to the supermarket?" In reality though, this translates to "want you to the supermarket go" correct? Why are we not just taught that instead of re-arranging the sentence to fit our English paradigm? I mean, once over the hump of learning the different structure, it seems it would be much easier to learn the language in the proper order instead of re-organizing it all in your head?

Why are we taught not using the literal translation? Example:

"möchten sie zum supermarkt gehen?" is translated to "do you want to go to the supermarket?"

In reality though, this translates to "want you to the supermarket go" correct? Why are we not just taught that instead of re-arranging the sentence to fit our English paradigm? I mean, once over the hump of learning the different structure, it seems it would be much easier to learn the language in the proper order instead of re-organizing it all in your head?

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Jafo
I guess I can see your point, but I still think it would be nice to have an option for literal translation to be accepted when doing the workouts.

I guess I can see your point, but I still think it would be nice to have an option for literal translation to be accepted when doing the workouts.

DennisG
Jafo, I doubt that this will ever happen, primarily because we don't think in literal translations. Typically, we think of the English phrase we'd like to say in a foreign language, then recall how to say it. As we get more skilled in using a language, we're able to substitute words into our phrases on the fly, but that's still a long way off from literal translations.

Jafo, I doubt that this will ever happen, primarily because we don't think in literal translations. Typically, we think of the English phrase we'd like to say in a foreign language, then recall how to say it. As we get more skilled in using a language, we're able to substitute words into our phrases on the fly, but that's still a long way off from literal translations.

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