no

Jafo

Posts: 0
Boonville, NY
There is a small error here: https://online.fluenz.com/#drill/N/5 The phrase is: "Diese zwölf Personen sind letzte Woche zum Treffen gekommen" The translation when you click on it is: "This twelve people came to the meeting last week" I believe that is supposed to be "These twelve" at least if it is supposed to be grammatically correct.

There is a small error here:

https://online.fluenz.com/#drill/N/5

The phrase is:

"Diese zwölf Personen sind letzte Woche zum Treffen gekommen"

The translation when you click on it is:

"This twelve people came to the meeting last week"

I believe that is supposed to be "These twelve" at least if it is supposed to be grammatically correct.

This question is unsolved
Sonia Gil
Thanks so much!! We'll take a look

Thanks so much!! We'll take a look

Post Comment
For those of you who find you're getting overwhelmed with certain parts of the German lessons, I just wanted to give you my recent experience and hope it offers you some hope. A couple months ago I "finished" level 2. But at the end, I was still out in the weeds on a few things, mostly the articles. I was getting a lot of the workouts wrong and couldn't figure out why something that was Der and then was Den is now all of a sudden Dem. It just didn't click and I felt that each session was making more clear my ignorance. When I finished level 1, I had a great sense of accomplishment and felt I really understood the material, but not at the end of 2. The holidays were starting to pick up at this time and my free time was becoming less and less. So for about a month, I put it all down. Then I went through all the review sessions in level 1 until I found anything that threw me off. If it did, I rolled back into those sessions until I figured it out and then continued through the reviews. By the time I got to the first review in level 2, I could see that I had to start that level all over. So starting from session 1, I have progressed up to my current session (14). I changed things up. I complete no more than 4 sessions a week and many times only do 3. When I do a new session, I don't progress until I do it twice and am confident that I get all the material. I may repeat one session 3-4 times over a couple days, but I refuse to rush it. I generally take weekends off and absorb what I have learned throughout the week. You know what? It is like a whole different world. I really have grasped a lot of the grammar that bewildered me before. I feel like this is actually starting to really sink in. When I watch German TV, I feel like I am understanding about 25-30% of what they are saying, where I absolutely did not before. BTW, I recommend the Heute app. You can get it on the Amazon fire stick for free. It shows you daily news reports from Germany. So if you feel like you are just not getting it, stop. Back up until you find where it all went wrong and start from there. You won't regret it!

For those of you who find you're getting overwhelmed with certain parts of the German lessons, I just wanted to give you my recent experience and hope it offers you some hope.

A couple months ago I "finished" level 2. But at the end, I was still out in the weeds on a few things, mostly the articles. I was getting a lot of the workouts wrong and couldn't figure out why something that was Der and then was Den is now all of a sudden Dem. It just didn't click and I felt that each session was making more clear my ignorance. When I finished level 1, I had a great sense of accomplishment and felt I really understood the material, but not at the end of 2.

The holidays were starting to pick up at this time and my free time was becoming less and less. So for about a month, I put it all down. Then I went through all the review sessions in level 1 until I found anything that threw me off. If it did, I rolled back into those sessions until I figured it out and then continued through the reviews. By the time I got to the first review in level 2, I could see that I had to start that level all over. So starting from session 1, I have progressed up to my current session (14).

I changed things up. I complete no more than 4 sessions a week and many times only do 3. When I do a new session, I don't progress until I do it twice and am confident that I get all the material. I may repeat one session 3-4 times over a couple days, but I refuse to rush it. I generally take weekends off and absorb what I have learned throughout the week. You know what? It is like a whole different world.

I really have grasped a lot of the grammar that bewildered me before. I feel like this is actually starting to really sink in. When I watch German TV, I feel like I am understanding about 25-30% of what they are saying, where I absolutely did not before. BTW, I recommend the Heute app. You can get it on the Amazon fire stick for free. It shows you daily news reports from Germany.

So if you feel like you are just not getting it, stop. Back up until you find where it all went wrong and start from there. You won't regret it!

2 people find this helpful
Emilie Poyet
Thank you so much for the great advice Jafo, knowing the complexity of German grammar it makes perfect sense! And it also follows Sonia's mantras to the dot: repeat, repeat, repeat + practice, practice, practice: the keys to really improving in any language. Keep it up!

Thank you so much for the great advice Jafo, knowing the complexity of German grammar it makes perfect sense!
And it also follows Sonia's mantras to the dot: repeat, repeat, repeat + practice, practice, practice: the keys to really improving in any language.
Keep it up!

Post Comment
I am having a hard time knowing when Ihre means her or their. In one of the workouts you have: Ihre Taschen and Ihre Flüge. The first means her bags and the second means their flights. How do you distinguish the two?

I am having a hard time knowing when Ihre means her or their. In one of the workouts you have:

Ihre Taschen and Ihre Flüge. The first means her bags and the second means their flights. How do you distinguish the two?

View all 3 comments
This question has been solved
Emilie Poyet
Hi Jafo, as Andy says, there is no difference between the two possessives in German (the only difference is the use of a capital letter when the meaning is "your"-Ihre). The same happens between sie = she and Sie = You(formal), so whenever these pronouns start a sentence -or when speaking- there is no way of knowing which one it is apart from the context, which is why we've varied the uses in our workouts. Don't worry too much about it though, generally the context will tell you if the person is talking about "her" or "your", the important thing is to know what they can mean, so keep up the good work!

Hi Jafo, as Andy says, there is no difference between the two possessives in German (the only difference is the use of a capital letter when the meaning is "your"-Ihre). The same happens between sie = she and Sie = You(formal), so whenever these pronouns start a sentence -or when speaking- there is no way of knowing which one it is apart from the context, which is why we've varied the uses in our workouts.
Don't worry too much about it though, generally the context will tell you if the person is talking about "her" or "your", the important thing is to know what they can mean, so keep up the good work!

andy@fluenz
Since there is no difference in inflection in either of the two, it comes down to the context of the situation. This can be tough at first but once you become more fluent you'll catch on. Here's an article that should help: https://www.fluentu.com/blog/german/german-ihr/

Since there is no difference in inflection in either of the two, it comes down to the context of the situation. This can be tough at first but once you become more fluent you'll catch on. Here's an article that should help: https://www.fluentu.com/blog/german/german-ihr/

Post Comment
There is a typo in the match phrases of this section (German 2, section 17): "Müssen wir Bier mibringen?" Instead of "Müssen wir Bier mitbringen?"

There is a typo in the match phrases of this section (German 2, section 17):

"Müssen wir Bier mibringen?"

Instead of

"Müssen wir Bier mitbringen?"

This question has been solved
Emilie Poyet
Thank you so much for reporting Jafo, we'll make sure to fix this typo in our next update

Thank you so much for reporting Jafo, we'll make sure to fix this typo in our next update

Post Comment
I don't know if any of you noticed, but if you have an Amazon Alexa (Echo), you can change it to speak German. It is helping me! Also, in English mode, you can ask it how to say words in German. Just another tool to help you along. :)

I don't know if any of you noticed, but if you have an Amazon Alexa (Echo), you can change it to speak German. It is helping me!

Also, in English mode, you can ask it how to say words in German. Just another tool to help you along. :)

View all 3 comments
This question is unsolved
Fabrice
same in chinese: "alexa, how to you say I want to go eat in chinese" ? and it tells me :)

same in chinese: "alexa, how to you say I want to go eat in chinese" ? and it tells me :)

Jafo
Yes, it understands me fine. :)

Yes, it understands me fine. :)

Post Comment
Why are we taught not using the literal translation? Example: "möchten sie zum supermarkt gehen?" is translated to "do you want to go to the supermarket?" In reality though, this translates to "want you to the supermarket go" correct? Why are we not just taught that instead of re-arranging the sentence to fit our English paradigm? I mean, once over the hump of learning the different structure, it seems it would be much easier to learn the language in the proper order instead of re-organizing it all in your head?

Why are we taught not using the literal translation? Example:

"möchten sie zum supermarkt gehen?" is translated to "do you want to go to the supermarket?"

In reality though, this translates to "want you to the supermarket go" correct? Why are we not just taught that instead of re-arranging the sentence to fit our English paradigm? I mean, once over the hump of learning the different structure, it seems it would be much easier to learn the language in the proper order instead of re-organizing it all in your head?

View all 4 comments
This question is unsolved
Jafo
I guess I can see your point, but I still think it would be nice to have an option for literal translation to be accepted when doing the workouts.

I guess I can see your point, but I still think it would be nice to have an option for literal translation to be accepted when doing the workouts.

DennisG
Jafo, I doubt that this will ever happen, primarily because we don't think in literal translations. Typically, we think of the English phrase we'd like to say in a foreign language, then recall how to say it. As we get more skilled in using a language, we're able to substitute words into our phrases on the fly, but that's still a long way off from literal translations.

Jafo, I doubt that this will ever happen, primarily because we don't think in literal translations. Typically, we think of the English phrase we'd like to say in a foreign language, then recall how to say it. As we get more skilled in using a language, we're able to substitute words into our phrases on the fly, but that's still a long way off from literal translations.

Post Comment
X