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Eric T.

Posts: 0
Lake Charles, Louisiana
United States
I finally finished Fluenz Portuguese Level 1. Although it took me longer than I originally thought (I worked on some French in between), I'm really impressed by what I've retained. The slow and steady (and repeat) route is definitely for me. Although I'm only about to begin level 2, is there any news on a release date for Portuguese 3? I have a feeling I'm hooked.

I finally finished Fluenz Portuguese Level 1. Although it took me longer than I originally thought (I worked on some French in between), I'm really impressed by what I've retained. The slow and steady (and repeat) route is definitely for me. Although I'm only about to begin level 2, is there any news on a release date for Portuguese 3? I have a feeling I'm hooked.

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andy@fluenz
I know we are working on it and last I heard the end of 2014 it should be released.

I know we are working on it and last I heard the end of 2014 it should be released.

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This may be a question some of you Spanish learners can help me with also. In the flashcards I came across the statement, "The bank is at the smaller building's entrance", which is translated in Portuguese as, "O banco tá na entrada do edifício menor". Why is estar being used here instead of ser? I think of the bank's location as rather permanent. Any thoughts?

This may be a question some of you Spanish learners can help me with also. In the flashcards I came across the statement, "The bank is at the smaller building's entrance", which is translated in Portuguese as, "O banco tá na entrada do edifício menor". Why is estar being used here instead of ser? I think of the bank's location as rather permanent. Any thoughts?

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Fabrice
In spanish, "and the hotel is close" would be "y el hotel está cerca", I confirmed with a Mexican native. Looks like it's different in portuguese?

In spanish, "and the hotel is close" would be "y el hotel está cerca", I confirmed with a Mexican native. Looks like it's different in portuguese?

Eric T.
Thanks for the Spanish perspective, Fabrice. I had a coworker who speaks Portuguese, but unfortunately she moved away. I may have to wait a little longer for the answer. Merci pour la réponse.

Thanks for the Spanish perspective, Fabrice. I had a coworker who speaks Portuguese, but unfortunately she moved away. I may have to wait a little longer for the answer. Merci pour la réponse.

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In Portuguese, is there a kind of liaison when two vowel sounds are together? In the program, when a native speakers says "Ela é legal" (She is nice), my ear only hears four syllables - Ela legal. Is the speaker saying é so fast that I don't hear it? I hit replay over and over and only hear four syllables.

In Portuguese, is there a kind of liaison when two vowel sounds are together? In the program, when a native speakers says "Ela é legal" (She is nice), my ear only hears four syllables - Ela legal. Is the speaker saying é so fast that I don't hear it? I hit replay over and over and only hear four syllables.

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Cathy Wood
I noticed this as well and makes sense to me. It is almost natural to do this since it makes the sentence glide nicely rather than sounding choppy

I noticed this as well and makes sense to me. It is almost natural to do this since it makes the sentence glide nicely rather than sounding choppy

FluenzLab
Hi @Eric T. Yes, in spoken Portuguese native speakers tend to link words together when there are two vowels in a row like here so it might be tricky to hear every single sound separately (a bit like the English gonna, wanna..). So be prepared to hear some of these when you go to Brazil.

Hi @Eric T.

Yes, in spoken Portuguese native speakers tend to link words together when there are two vowels in a row like here so it might be tricky to hear every single sound separately (a bit like the English gonna, wanna..). So be prepared to hear some of these when you go to Brazil.

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I like the new website design. Just one small thing I noticed...when you click on "Learn More" under the Portuguese language header and scroll down to Fluenz Portuguese Works, the curvy arrow is actually covering up the word explanations. I looked under French and saw how it is supposed to look. I never saw anything wrong with the last website design, but at least the new site reflects the changes and updates that have been made to Fluenz recently. Good job.

I like the new website design. Just one small thing I noticed...when you click on "Learn More" under the Portuguese language header and scroll down to Fluenz Portuguese Works, the curvy arrow is actually covering up the word explanations. I looked under French and saw how it is supposed to look. I never saw anything wrong with the last website design, but at least the new site reflects the changes and updates that have been made to Fluenz recently. Good job.

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andy@fluenz
Thanks Eric, I really appreciate the help!

Thanks Eric, I really appreciate the help!

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Celebrating Mardi Gras today. People are out to see the parades even in 35°F, rainy weather. That's dedication or just crazy. Either way... Laissez les bons temps rouler!

Celebrating Mardi Gras today. People are out to see the parades even in 35°F, rainy weather. That's dedication or just crazy. Either way...
Laissez les bons temps rouler!

Eric T.
By the way, I think my new favorite flavor of King Cake is Raspberry / Bavarian Cream. Mmm! Mmm! Mmm!

By the way, I think my new favorite flavor of King Cake is Raspberry / Bavarian Cream. Mmm! Mmm! Mmm!

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I am having trouble with the time zone setting in my profile. I keep having to change it to the correct time zone because it keeps reverting back to eastern time (New York). I am saving the change, but it's not sticking. Not sure if it's a cookie problem or not.

I am having trouble with the time zone setting in my profile. I keep having to change it to the correct time zone because it keeps reverting back to eastern time (New York). I am saving the change, but it's not sticking. Not sure if it's a cookie problem or not.

Eric T.
After looking at it again, even though the program says the changes are saved, the time zone is still incorrect. So, my posts will always be an hour in the future for anyone in the central time zone.

After looking at it again, even though the program says the changes are saved, the time zone is still incorrect. So, my posts will always be an hour in the future for anyone in the central time zone.

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In Fluenz Portuguese 1, session 15, I am confused by the use of 'muito' in one statement and 'muitos' in the other. This statement, "Sim, então esses aqui são muito bons." uses the singular 'muito', but this statement, "Tem sucos muitos bons nesse restaurante." uses the plural 'muitos". I understand in the second statement, muitos and bons refer to juices (sucos) and is therefore plural. In the first statement, bons is plural but not muito. Are they not both referring to esses (these), which is plural? Why is it bons is used but not muitos in the first statement. Also, to make matters more confusing, when the second statement is vocalized by the program, it sounds as though the lady is saying muito and not muitos.

In Fluenz Portuguese 1, session 15, I am confused by the use of 'muito' in one statement and 'muitos' in the other. This statement, "Sim, então esses aqui são muito bons." uses the singular 'muito', but this statement, "Tem sucos muitos bons nesse restaurante." uses the plural 'muitos".
I understand in the second statement, muitos and bons refer to juices (sucos) and is therefore plural. In the first statement, bons is plural but not muito. Are they not both referring to esses (these), which is plural? Why is it bons is used but not muitos in the first statement. Also, to make matters more confusing, when the second statement is vocalized by the program, it sounds as though the lady is saying muito and not muitos.

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Eric T.
Thanks, Kevin. I emailed support and you are right. I was told that a correction would be made in an upcoming update. The form where "muito" is used as an adjective was covered in a latter session. I appreciate your help.

Thanks, Kevin. I emailed support and you are right. I was told that a correction would be made in an upcoming update. The form where "muito" is used as an adjective was covered in a latter session. I appreciate your help.

Kevin C
As I understand it, "muito(s)/muita(s)" are the adjective forms, and "muito" is the adverb form. An adverb modifies an adjective, so it looks to me like "Tem sucos muitos bons ..." should instead be "Tem sucos muito bons ..."

As I understand it, "muito(s)/muita(s)" are the adjective forms, and "muito" is the adverb form. An adverb modifies an adjective, so it looks to me like "Tem sucos muitos bons ..." should instead be "Tem sucos muito bons ..."

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I'm doing the review (session 11) of Portuguese level 1. So far, the program uses "O limão" for lemon and lime. My Portuguese dictionary uses "a lima" for lime and "o limão" for lemon. They are two different fruits, so which should I use for lime? Obviously, I have to use "o limão" in the program, but in Brazil, is "o limão" used interchangeably for both fruits?

I'm doing the review (session 11) of Portuguese level 1. So far, the program uses "O limão" for lemon and lime. My Portuguese dictionary uses "a lima" for lime and "o limão" for lemon. They are two different fruits, so which should I use for lime? Obviously, I have to use "o limão" in the program, but in Brazil, is "o limão" used interchangeably for both fruits?

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Eric T.
It's one of the best citrus fruit flavors in my opinion. I love lime slices especially with margaritas. And key lime pie is another favorite of mine. The typical fruit found in American grocery stores is the Persian lime, but I can also find the key limes from time to time.

It's one of the best citrus fruit flavors in my opinion. I love lime slices especially with margaritas. And key lime pie is another favorite of mine. The typical fruit found in American grocery stores is the Persian lime, but I can also find the key limes from time to time.

esquilo
In Brazil the fruit they call lima is a fruit about the size of an orange. It is pale green and sweet like an orange. I have never seen this fruit in the US. The fruit we call key lime is called limão verde in Brazil. I hope this helps.

In Brazil the fruit they call lima is a fruit about the size of an orange. It is pale green and sweet like an orange. I have never seen this fruit in the US. The fruit we call key lime is called limão verde in Brazil. I hope this helps.

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The following link is to a page with song lyrics and a YouTube video of a song in Portuguese that I find enjoyable and helpful with my Portuguese studies. You can read the lyrics as the song plays.http://musica.com.br/artistas/kid-abelha/m/eu-tou-tentando/letra.html

The following link is to a page with song lyrics and a YouTube video of a song in Portuguese that I find enjoyable and helpful with my Portuguese studies. You can read the lyrics as the song plays.
http://musica.com.br/artistas/kid-abelha/m/eu-tou-tentando/letra.html

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Mark B.
@ Eric T. Great link! Thank you for sharing

@ Eric T. Great link! Thank you for sharing

Eric T.
@ Mark B. You're welcome. Glad you enjoyed it.

@ Mark B. You're welcome. Glad you enjoyed it.

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In Fluenz Portuguese 1, session 5, Repeat the Words, the word ‘de’ in the phrase ‘O suco de laranja’ is pronounced as ‘DAY’, whereas in session 4, the word ‘de’ in the Repeat the Words exercise phrase ‘Suco de laranja’ is pronounced as more of a ‘JAH’ sound. Are both correct ways of pronunciation for ‘de’? I thought the 'de' had a jee sound as in jeep. My ear might be missing something, but in the exercise it sounds as though she is saying 'day', as in the French contraction des.

In Fluenz Portuguese 1, session 5, Repeat the Words, the word ‘de’ in the phrase ‘O suco de laranja’ is pronounced as ‘DAY’, whereas in session 4, the word ‘de’ in the Repeat the Words exercise phrase ‘Suco de laranja’ is pronounced as more of a ‘JAH’ sound. Are both correct ways of pronunciation for ‘de’? I thought the 'de' had a jee sound as in jeep. My ear might be missing something, but in the exercise it sounds as though she is saying 'day', as in the French contraction des.

Eric T.
I received the answer from tech support -- they do a terrific job. Here is the response that I received: Hi Eric, I've just heard back from one of our Portuguese experts. Here is her answer to your question: "The user is right, the word "de" is usually pronounced "dji" as in the English word "Jeep" for example, we explain this right at the beginning of level 1, yet there are many many variations in pronunciation around Brazil, and sometimes this word is pronounced a bit like "day" as the user says. So both ways are fine, even if the "dji" pronunciation is more common." I hope this information proves to be helpful. Let us know if we can help with anything else. Happy Holidays! Cheers, Mélanie, User Support

I received the answer from tech support -- they do a terrific job. Here is the response that I received:
Hi Eric,

I've just heard back from one of our Portuguese experts. Here is her answer to your question:

"The user is right, the word "de" is usually pronounced "dji" as in the English word "Jeep" for example, we explain this right at the beginning of level 1, yet there are many many variations in pronunciation around Brazil, and sometimes this word is pronounced a bit like "day" as the user says.
So both ways are fine, even if the "dji" pronunciation is more common."

I hope this information proves to be helpful. Let us know if we can help with anything else. Happy Holidays!

Cheers,

Mélanie, User Support

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