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El Turco

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CHICOPEE, Massachusetts
In level 4 lesson 15 this sentence: (I) would like to go for a walk, although (I)’m a little tired(f) has this answer: Quisiera ir a pasear, aunque estoy un poco cansada. Question: Why is cansada not given feminine "una poca".....?

In level 4 lesson 15 this sentence: (I) would like to go for a walk, although (I)’m a little tired(f) has this answer: Quisiera ir a pasear, aunque estoy un poco cansada. Question: Why is cansada not given feminine "una poca".....?

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El Turco
Got it! (now I just have to remember it) Thanks.

Got it! (now I just have to remember it) Thanks.

andy@fluenz
The adverbial construction "un poco + adj" normally modifies adjectives and similar words that agree in number and gender with other words ("Ella" here), but it doesn't change itself. Its function is similar to words like "algo": Ella es un poco gorda. Él es un poco gordo. Ellos son un poco gordos. Ellas son un poco gordas. Ella es algo gorda. https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/un-poco-o-una-poca.638507/

The adverbial construction "un poco + adj" normally modifies adjectives and similar words that agree in number and gender with other words ("Ella" here), but it doesn't change itself. Its function is similar to words like "algo":

Ella es un poco gorda. Él es un poco gordo. Ellos son un poco gordos. Ellas son un poco gordas.

Ella es algo gorda. https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/un-poco-o-una-poca.638507/

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In the following sentence from level 4: Me gusta estar allí porque es un buen lugar donde podemos divertirnos. Why is divertimos not just the reflexive infinitive since podemos is already conjugated....we are able to have fun.... podemos divertirnos

In the following sentence from level 4:
Me gusta estar allí porque es un buen lugar donde podemos divertirnos.
Why is divertimos not just the reflexive infinitive since podemos is already conjugated....we are able to have fun.... podemos divertirnos

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Fabrice
In Spanish you say the equivalent of "we can have fun ourselves", so the "we" part is "podemos", the "fun ourselves" is "divertirnos". If you know French you might be confused because you could use the reflexive infinitive when using "On'. But not in spanish.

In Spanish you say the equivalent of "we can have fun ourselves", so the "we" part is "podemos", the "fun ourselves" is "divertirnos". If you know French you might be confused because you could use the reflexive infinitive when using "On'. But not in spanish.

James Putney
Isn't this a form of "divertirse", a reflexive infinitive meaning "to have fun?"

Isn't this a form of "divertirse", a reflexive infinitive meaning "to have fun?"

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This seems minor but I am getting myself confused... Usually adjectives go after the noun they are describing, yes? So, "en vez pasada" makes sense but then in the next exercise, the related phrase "primera vez" seems to flip that. Does primera/o go first as a convention while other adjectives go after the verb "camisa negra".

This seems minor but I am getting myself confused... Usually adjectives go after the noun they are describing, yes? So, "en vez pasada" makes sense but then in the next exercise, the related phrase "primera vez" seems to flip that. Does primera/o go first as a convention while other adjectives go after the verb "camisa negra".

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El Turco
Yes, thanks. Like I mentioned, I think I was getting my own thinking mixed up.

Yes, thanks. Like I mentioned, I think I was getting my own thinking mixed up.

zac.hilliker
The placement of adjectives depends on their purpose. Some familiar cases where you see the adjective coming before the noun... Buenos dias, buenas noches, etc. In this case, "primero" is a determiner, specifically an ordinal number, so it goes before the noun. You will also see this when learning about courses of a meal. El primer plato. Or when getting directions. La segunda salida. Now, if you're getting hung up on "la vez pasada" as "last time," it is not "last" as in "first and last." You might instead literally translate it as "the time/occurrence that passed." Let's use a noun that is a little easier to understand. Semana La semana pasada - the week that passed - last week La semana que viene - the week that comes - next week La primera semana - the first week. i.e. La primera semana de julio - The first week of July La ultima semana - the last week. i.e. La ultima semana de julio - The last week of July Here are some useful links about adjective placement and a little more about types of determiners (in English). https://www.thoughtco.com/adjectives-in-their-place-3078145https://www.thoughtco.com/determiner-in-grammar-1690442 Hope that helps!

The placement of adjectives depends on their purpose. Some familiar cases where you see the adjective coming before the noun... Buenos dias, buenas noches, etc.

In this case, "primero" is a determiner, specifically an ordinal number, so it goes before the noun. You will also see this when learning about courses of a meal. El primer plato. Or when getting directions. La segunda salida. Now, if you're getting hung up on "la vez pasada" as "last time," it is not "last" as in "first and last." You might instead literally translate it as "the time/occurrence that passed."

Let's use a noun that is a little easier to understand. Semana

La semana pasada - the week that passed - last week
La semana que viene - the week that comes - next week
La primera semana - the first week. i.e. La primera semana de julio - The first week of July
La ultima semana - the last week. i.e. La ultima semana de julio - The last week of July

Here are some useful links about adjective placement and a little more about types of determiners (in English).

https://www.thoughtco.com/adjectives-in-their-place-3078145
https://www.thoughtco.com/determiner-in-grammar-1690442

Hope that helps!

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How do I know this is about a future event: Su esposo le trae un regalo. The program translates as, "Her husband will bring her a gift." I read this as; Her husband brings her a gift. How do I know this is something he WILL do? No entiendo. (level 3)

How do I know this is about a future event: Su esposo le trae un regalo. The program translates as, "Her husband will bring her a gift." I read this as; Her husband brings her a gift. How do I know this is something he WILL do? No entiendo. (level 3)

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zac.hilliker
Don't worry! Sometimes I translate to English in two steps, first literally, then to what we would actually say in English. This helps me to remember the differences in structure or phrasing.

Don't worry! Sometimes I translate to English in two steps, first literally, then to what we would actually say in English. This helps me to remember the differences in structure or phrasing.

zac.hilliker
As is mentioned many times in the lessons, Spanish relies on context a lot! In the exercises, we don't always have context clues to tell us what the best translation would be. However, although "Her husband brings her a gift" is a sentence, it doesn't make much real-life sense on its own. In English we would be more likely to say "Her husband will bring her a gift," "Her husband is bringing her a gift" or "Her husband brought her a gift." If we added "every Sunday," Su esposo le trae un regalo todos los domingos, the present tense translation makes more sense since it would be "Her husband brings her a gift every Sunday." BUT, even that could be translated as "will bring her a gift every Sunday." It's all in the context!

As is mentioned many times in the lessons, Spanish relies on context a lot! In the exercises, we don't always have context clues to tell us what the best translation would be. However, although "Her husband brings her a gift" is a sentence, it doesn't make much real-life sense on its own. In English we would be more likely to say "Her husband will bring her a gift," "Her husband is bringing her a gift" or "Her husband brought her a gift." If we added "every Sunday," Su esposo le trae un regalo todos los domingos, the present tense translation makes more sense since it would be "Her husband brings her a gift every Sunday." BUT, even that could be translated as "will bring her a gift every Sunday." It's all in the context!

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