no

dxcomic

Posts: 0
United States
I want you to know how grateful I am to you guys for creating this program. My daughter (shown in the photo) is 12 and she did the 5 levels of Spanish for Spain in 5 months, a lesson a day, rain, shine, snow days from school, Sundays. She worked fast and furiously to prepare for a trip to Spain this Summer. I'm here to report that her abilities, in country, exceeded my expectations! She made friends in a nearby town and would spend all day with locals, playing soccer (Fuerza Barca!), and all kinds of kids games, spent many nights at friends houses, and was so sad to return to the US. I can now say "My daughter speaks Spanish." If you need a case study for success of this program, she's the poster child! Sure, she really didn't need to order beer or red wine, and she learned present perfect (used in place of preterite in Spain) being there and hearing people speak. But she had a base to communicate, a springboard, and she dove in. She'd run into stores and buy things, ask for directions, and it just gave her the confidence to embark on "the adventure" of exploring the unknown, and unfamiliar, to take a chance. And it all paid off! ------ My undying gratitude to all you guys!!

I want you to know how grateful I am to you guys for creating this program. My daughter (shown in the photo) is 12 and she did the 5 levels of Spanish for Spain in 5 months, a lesson a day, rain, shine, snow days from school, Sundays. She worked fast and furiously to prepare for a trip to Spain this Summer. I'm here to report that her abilities, in country, exceeded my expectations! She made friends in a nearby town and would spend all day with locals, playing soccer (Fuerza Barca!), and all kinds of kids games, spent many nights at friends houses, and was so sad to return to the US. I can now say "My daughter speaks Spanish." If you need a case study for success of this program, she's the poster child!
Sure, she really didn't need to order beer or red wine, and she learned present perfect (used in place of preterite in Spain) being there and hearing people speak. But she had a base to communicate, a springboard, and she dove in. She'd run into stores and buy things, ask for directions, and it just gave her the confidence to embark on "the adventure" of exploring the unknown, and unfamiliar, to take a chance. And it all paid off! ------ My undying gratitude to all you guys!!

1 person finds this helpful
Post Comment
I want you to know how grateful I am to you guys for creating this program. My daughter (shown in the photo) is 12 and she did the 5 levels of Spanish for Spain in 5 months, a lesson a day, rain, shine, snow days from school, Sundays. She worked fast and furiously to prepare for a trip to Spain this Summer. I'm here to report that her abilities, in country, exceeded my expectations! She made friends in a nearby town and would spend all day with locals, playing soccer (Fuerza Barca!), and all kinds of kids games, spent many nights at friends houses, and was so sad to return to the US. I can now say "My daughter speaks Spanish." If you need a case study for success of this program, she's the poster child! Sure, she really didn't need to order beer or red wine, and she learned present perfect (used in place of preterite in Spain) being there and hearing people speak. But she had a base to communicate, a springboard, and she dove in. She'd run into stores and buy things, ask for directions, and it just gave her the confidence to embark on "the adventure" of exploring the unknown, and unfamiliar, to take a chance. And it all paid off! ------ My undying gratitude to all you guys!!

I want you to know how grateful I am to you guys for creating this program. My daughter (shown in the photo) is 12 and she did the 5 levels of Spanish for Spain in 5 months, a lesson a day, rain, shine, snow days from school, Sundays. She worked fast and furiously to prepare for a trip to Spain this Summer. I'm here to report that her abilities, in country, exceeded my expectations! She made friends in a nearby town and would spend all day with locals, playing soccer (Fuerza Barca!), and all kinds of kids games, spent many nights at friends houses, and was so sad to return to the US. I can now say "My daughter speaks Spanish." If you need a case study for success of this program, she's the poster child!
Sure, she really didn't need to order beer or red wine, and she learned present perfect (used in place of preterite in Spain) being there and hearing people speak. But she had a base to communicate, a springboard, and she dove in. She'd run into stores and buy things, ask for directions, and it just gave her the confidence to embark on "the adventure" of exploring the unknown, and unfamiliar, to take a chance. And it all paid off! ------ My undying gratitude to all you guys!!

View all 3 comments
4 people find this helpful
This question is unsolved
dxcomic
Kudos to you for your hard work and determination. It won't hurt her to redo the lessons now that we're back in the US. Full disclosure, we have some advantages that make for unfair comparisons. I defend myself pretty well in Spanish,having lived a couple years in Colombia many years ago, and my daughter's step mom, my wife, is from Spain and teaches at college level. But after more than 5 years of hearing us speak, very little was picked up. My wife was so impressed with my daughter's progress that she had me purchase French for her. She could audit French classes for free at the university but feels her time is better invested with Fluenz. I try to improve my Spanish reading newspapers online and watching RTVE, TV from Spain available online and as an free app.

Kudos to you for your hard work and determination. It won't hurt her to redo the lessons now that we're back in the US. Full disclosure, we have some advantages that make for unfair comparisons. I defend myself pretty well in Spanish,having lived a couple years in Colombia many years ago, and my daughter's step mom, my wife, is from Spain and teaches at college level.
But after more than 5 years of hearing us speak, very little was picked up.
My wife was so impressed with my daughter's progress that she had me purchase French for her. She could audit French classes for free at the university but feels her time is better invested with Fluenz.
I try to improve my Spanish reading newspapers online and watching RTVE, TV from Spain available online and as an free app.

Sonia Gil
WOW WOW WOW - Felicitaciones! These stories are precisely what keep us going and make us improve the product every day. Thanks so much for sharing this with us.

WOW WOW WOW - Felicitaciones! These stories are precisely what keep us going and make us improve the product every day. Thanks so much for sharing this with us.

Post Comment
A couple of people have commented but I was hoping a Spaniard or someone from Fluenz, or a Venezuelan. Wait, I know one. I'm going to call a friend from Caracas. To be continued...

A couple of people have commented but I was hoping a Spaniard or someone from Fluenz, or a Venezuelan. Wait, I know one. I'm going to call a friend from Caracas. To be continued...

View all 3 comments
This question has been solved
dxcomic
Apolonia - Thanks. It's now October and I'm just noticing you responded. I stopped checking back after a while. Great that you're on here!

Apolonia - Thanks. It's now October and I'm just noticing you responded. I stopped checking back after a while. Great that you're on here!

Apolonia D.
Hi dxcomic, Sorry for taking so long to reply!! You are correct. In Spain, cruzar is "to cross" and girar would be specifically to turn (minus the crossing)--- but if you were to use cruzar to mean just to turn although not necessarily accurate, you would be understood. Girar would be the exact word used (in Spain). Like Ionatan wrote, if we get technical it can get specific- like in his truck example. As always context is what gives you the best translation. To simplify things in Fluenz we left only one word that would be understood in all contexts and the idea was also to stick to the one that was more similar to English, to make it easier to retain for the users.... But now that you know both, you can make the distinction :) In any case with "a la derecha/izquierda" you'll be understood, but we'll take this into account when we prepare a new version of the software. Thanks a lot for posting... (I was born and raised in Spain by the way). Apolonia from Fluenz

Hi dxcomic,

Sorry for taking so long to reply!! You are correct. In Spain, cruzar is "to cross" and girar would be specifically to turn (minus the crossing)--- but if you were to use cruzar to mean just to turn although not necessarily accurate, you would be understood. Girar would be the exact word used (in Spain). Like Ionatan wrote, if we get technical it can get specific- like in his truck example. As always context is what gives you the best translation. To simplify things in Fluenz we left only one word that would be understood in all contexts and the idea was also to stick to the one that was more similar to English, to make it easier to retain for the users.... But now that you know both, you can make the distinction :) In any case with "a la derecha/izquierda" you'll be understood, but we'll take this into account when we prepare a new version of the software. Thanks a lot for posting... (I was born and raised in Spain by the way).
Apolonia from Fluenz

Post Comment
I'm so proud of my daughter, Ari (12) who stuck with Fluenz for 5 months averaging a lesson a day (even on weekends, snow days, and holidays) and today she finished the final level. It was a lofty goal, but she rose to the occasion, sometimes getting even 5-6 days behind and then catching up with multiple lessons a day (one snow day she spent from 9am -4pm and did 5 lessons). Now two months of flashcards and practice before returning to Spain, this time for a soccer camp. A bit scary, but she's well armed now to communicate.

I'm so proud of my daughter, Ari (12) who stuck with Fluenz for 5 months averaging a lesson a day (even on weekends, snow days, and holidays) and today she finished the final level. It was a lofty goal, but she rose to the occasion, sometimes getting even 5-6 days behind and then catching up with multiple lessons a day (one snow day she spent from 9am -4pm and did 5 lessons).

Now two months of flashcards and practice before returning to Spain, this time for a soccer camp. A bit scary, but she's well armed now to communicate.

View all 3 comments
1 person finds this helpful
James Bodnar
that's great for any of us let alone a 12 year old. Is she going to do another language after spanish?

that's great for any of us let alone a 12 year old. Is she going to do another language after spanish?

ajollybengali
felicitaciones a su hija! Did you use any other supplemental materials or solely Fluenz?

felicitaciones a su hija! Did you use any other supplemental materials or solely Fluenz?

Post Comment
I posted this in another area but since the original post asking this question was unanswered from 2011, I'm trying again: Spanish (for Spain L-4 lessons 25-27) use "Cruzar a la derecha" to mean "Turn to the right." I asked my Spaniard wife was this correct and she said "no way." She's from 2 hours North of Madrid, so I thought maybe this is the phrase used in Andalucia in the South or a carry-over from Latin American Spanish. I've searched Wordreference.com and I did not find any mention of Cruzar used this way. Girar, in Spain, or doblar in South America, I've heard. But, I love finding out I'm wrong, so someone "school" me.

I posted this in another area but since the original post asking this question was unanswered from 2011, I'm trying again:
Spanish (for Spain L-4 lessons 25-27) use "Cruzar a la derecha" to mean "Turn to the right."
I asked my Spaniard wife was this correct and she said "no way." She's from 2 hours North of Madrid, so I thought maybe this is the phrase used in Andalucia in the South or a carry-over from Latin American Spanish. I've searched Wordreference.com and I did not find any mention of Cruzar used this way. Girar, in Spain, or doblar in South America, I've heard. But, I love finding out I'm wrong, so someone "school" me.

View all 3 comments
This question is unsolved
Zulu
"Cruzar" means "to cross". I would translate "Cruzar a la derecha" to crossing the street to your right, which would implying a turn. In the case of the truck I would say it means crossing the lanes of traffic towards the left. But "cruzar a la derecha" does not translate to "turn to the right" in Spain.

"Cruzar" means "to cross". I would translate "Cruzar a la derecha" to crossing the street to your right, which would implying a turn. In the case of the truck I would say it means crossing the lanes of traffic towards the left. But "cruzar a la derecha" does not translate to "turn to the right" in Spain.

dxcomic
Ionatan - Thanks. (Are you from Spain? What part?) Still begs the question of how that small but obvious mistake made it into the Spanish for Spain lessons, but moreover, why the Spaniard reading it for the audio, didn't point this out. It's not a big deal, but was curious as to how it crept in. That part of the mystery continues. :-)

Ionatan - Thanks. (Are you from Spain? What part?) Still begs the question of how that small but obvious mistake made it into the Spanish for Spain lessons, but moreover, why the Spaniard reading it for the audio, didn't point this out. It's not a big deal, but was curious as to how it crept in. That part of the mystery continues. :-)

Post Comment
My 12 yr old daughter is going at a pace of a lesson a day, now on Level 2, lesson 18, so it's a race to fluency by our summer trip to Spain. One thing I've not seen (in skipping ahead) is present perfect tense, which seems to be replacing preterite with Spaniards in day-to-day speech. I did not go through every lesson, but I was surprised to not see perfect tense used in the last couple lessons, so I wondered. My wife is from Northern Spain and I thought it was just her until meeting other Spaniards and visiting Spain a few times. In some ways, its easier to learn the perfect tense, since the conjugation is always the same. Thoughts? I mean my daughter will learn Perfect from us or relatives, but it does seem a huge part of the way Spanish is commonly spoken there. Example: instead of saying "we ate" comimos, they almost exclusively say "we've eaten" hemos comido.

My 12 yr old daughter is going at a pace of a lesson a day, now on Level 2, lesson 18, so it's a race to fluency by our summer trip to Spain.
One thing I've not seen (in skipping ahead) is present perfect tense, which seems to be replacing preterite with Spaniards in day-to-day speech. I did not go through every lesson, but I was surprised to not see perfect tense used in the last couple lessons, so I wondered.
My wife is from Northern Spain and I thought it was just her until meeting other Spaniards and visiting Spain a few times.
In some ways, its easier to learn the perfect tense, since the conjugation is always the same. Thoughts? I mean my daughter will learn Perfect from us or relatives, but it does seem a huge part of the way Spanish is commonly spoken there.
Example: instead of saying "we ate" comimos, they almost exclusively say "we've eaten" hemos comido.

View all 4 comments
1 person finds this helpful
This question is unsolved
dxcomic
I have Spanish for Spain. My guess was that it was, yes, ported over from the Latin American Spanish version. We supplement present perfect as we go along since that's almost exclusively how my wife's family speaks of the past.

I have Spanish for Spain. My guess was that it was, yes, ported over from the Latin American Spanish version. We supplement present perfect as we go along since that's almost exclusively how my wife's family speaks of the past.

dxcomic
She's now to Level 4 lesson 26 still on track to do a level a month for five months. Then one month of flash cards and we go back to Spain. Can't wait for her to see how different it will be now that she can defend herself in Spanish.

She's now to Level 4 lesson 26 still on track to do a level a month for five months. Then one month of flash cards and we go back to Spain. Can't wait for her to see how different it will be now that she can defend herself in Spanish.

Post Comment
X