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DoctorGuyFawkes

Posts: 0
Clifton, NJ
I notice that when an individual is asked what he would like to eat or drink, "da" is included: Che cosa vuole da mangiare? ; Che cosa vuole da bere? ; Yet when multiple individuals are being addressed, "da" is omitted: Che cosa volete mangiare, Che cosa volete bere? This may have already been addressed, but I was just wondering if there's a specific reason for this, and if it is necessary at all times... Also, isn't the inclusion of "da" redundant - wouldn't it translate to, "What thing do you want to to drink (or eat)," for mangiare means "to eat" and bere means "to drink"...

I notice that when an individual is asked what he would like to eat or drink, "da" is included: Che cosa vuole da mangiare? ; Che cosa vuole da bere? ; Yet when multiple individuals are being addressed, "da" is omitted: Che cosa volete mangiare, Che cosa volete bere?

This may have already been addressed, but I was just wondering if there's a specific reason for this, and if it is necessary at all times... Also, isn't the inclusion of "da" redundant - wouldn't it translate to, "What thing do you want to to drink (or eat)," for mangiare means "to eat" and bere means "to drink"...

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I notice that with the word aeroporto, it is sometimes pronounced "airoporto" and other times "ah-airoporto." Also, with words containing double-letters, they are not always pronounced the same - for example, zucchero places its emphasis on the beginning ("dzu") while bicchiere places its emphasis on the middle ("kye"), as does ufficio ("fee")... Also, with regards to rolling one's tongue, I find that I am able to roll it well but for only a short period of time. A word like arrivederci contains a rather sustained tongue-roll near the end of the word... How does one go about sustaining a tongue-roll?

I notice that with the word aeroporto, it is sometimes pronounced "airoporto" and other times "ah-airoporto." Also, with words containing double-letters, they are not always pronounced the same - for example, zucchero places its emphasis on the beginning ("dzu") while bicchiere places its emphasis on the middle ("kye"), as does ufficio ("fee")...

Also, with regards to rolling one's tongue, I find that I am able to roll it well but for only a short period of time. A word like arrivederci contains a rather sustained tongue-roll near the end of the word... How does one go about sustaining a tongue-roll?

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Fabrice
@Nando1985, yes I've watched hundreds of videos and none helped :(

@Nando1985, yes I've watched hundreds of videos and none helped :(

alimarie1331
I too have watched many videos and had little luck. I spent a lot of time when alone sounding like an idiot just trying to do it over and over...and over. At first I couldn't get a roll *at all* and even now when I do get it I also have trouble sustaining it. I've found practicing with the word 'quattro' helpful. I think it's easier because your tongue is hitting the back of your teeth and it's helpful to use the force (???) of that to start a roll. Also exhaling right as I'm starting the trill helps. It messes up the pronunciation sometimes, but then again, I'm only doing it to help myself get the hang of it. It's very hard to explain...kind of like I'm saying 'hro'. 'Quatt-hro.' This is probably as (un)helpful as all of the videos, but wanted to post *just* in case it might help someone. Unfortunately, I think the only solution is finding a way that helps you get it once and then just doing that over and over. :/

I too have watched many videos and had little luck. I spent a lot of time when alone sounding like an idiot just trying to do it over and over...and over. At first I couldn't get a roll *at all* and even now when I do get it I also have trouble sustaining it. I've found practicing with the word 'quattro' helpful. I think it's easier because your tongue is hitting the back of your teeth and it's helpful to use the force (???) of that to start a roll. Also exhaling right as I'm starting the trill helps. It messes up the pronunciation sometimes, but then again, I'm only doing it to help myself get the hang of it. It's very hard to explain...kind of like I'm saying 'hro'. 'Quatt-hro.' This is probably as (un)helpful as all of the videos, but wanted to post *just* in case it might help someone. Unfortunately, I think the only solution is finding a way that helps you get it once and then just doing that over and over. :/

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