no

DennisG

Posts: 0
Seattle, WA
United States
I'm in level 2, lesson 12, and I see the word "prossima" and "prossimo" placed both before and after "settimana" and "mese." This is confusing. Is there a rule that covers how to structure the sentence?

I'm in level 2, lesson 12, and I see the word "prossima" and "prossimo" placed both before and after "settimana" and "mese." This is confusing. Is there a rule that covers how to structure the sentence?

This question has been solved
DennisG
Thanks, Andy. What was most confusing is that when I used it before the noun, and the program expected it to follow the noun, it wouldn't accept my answer. You can see how that would be misleading and baffling.

Thanks, Andy. What was most confusing is that when I used it before the noun, and the program expected it to follow the noun, it wouldn't accept my answer. You can see how that would be misleading and baffling.

andy@fluenz
I understand this can be confusing. Sonia only mentions it in the pronunciation exercises in level 3. Both "prossimo" and "scorso" can be used before or after the noun, they are equally correct and you'll hear both structures. We'll work on making this a bit easier to understand in a future version of the program.

I understand this can be confusing. Sonia only mentions it in the pronunciation exercises in level 3. Both "prossimo" and "scorso" can be used before or after the noun, they are equally correct and you'll hear both structures. We'll work on making this a bit easier to understand in a future version of the program.

Post Comment
In Italian level 2 lesson 7 (a review lesson), I came across the following sentence: "Dove posso comprare una cartina?" While I can guess what it means, we haven't yet had the word "posso" in any lesson. Did I somehow miss it?

In Italian level 2 lesson 7 (a review lesson), I came across the following sentence: "Dove posso comprare una cartina?" While I can guess what it means, we haven't yet had the word "posso" in any lesson. Did I somehow miss it?

View all 3 comments
This question is unsolved
DennisG
Honestly, Andy, I don't understand the logic of that. Isn't the purpose of a review lesson to review what we've already been exposed to, and not what we haven't? The result, for me, is that I spent a frustrating 90 minutes going over previous lessons to find the word I erroneously thought I'd missed.

Honestly, Andy, I don't understand the logic of that. Isn't the purpose of a review lesson to review what we've already been exposed to, and not what we haven't? The result, for me, is that I spent a frustrating 90 minutes going over previous lessons to find the word I erroneously thought I'd missed.

andy@fluenz
Dennis, I'm afraid I can't answer why it was done that way, but I'll be sure to pass your comment onto Sonia and our developers. I'm sorry for the frustration. Next time if you're in doubt, feel free to write us first before going through all of the lessons.

Dennis, I'm afraid I can't answer why it was done that way, but I'll be sure to pass your comment onto Sonia and our developers. I'm sorry for the frustration. Next time if you're in doubt, feel free to write us first before going through all of the lessons.

Post Comment
I think you folks continue to make the update process far more cumbersome for your customers than it needs to be. Consider that ... 1. You're the only software company I know of that insists that your users repeatedly dig out their old discs to locate the version number. Since we've told you in the past what our version number is, why can't you make this information easier for us to find so that we don't have to dig through closets and drawers to find our old discs? 2. I started going through the update process, and selected Italian from the pull-down menu. Since I didn't really want to find my old discs, I selected the "If you don't know your version number" link, and was told the version number of my SPANISH discs. What, exactly, was the point of selecting Italian? 3. After 35 minutes of looking, I found my old discs and identified the version number. It was, of course, not one of the version numbers available from the pull-down menu. But I was glad to see a link for those whose number was below v. 2.5. I selected this link, then downloaded Italian 2. When I double-clicked on the resulting file, I got an "Unidentified Developer" error. Time invested in trying to update my software: 52 minutes. Results: no updates. Finally, if you don't happen to use Fluenz Commons, which, I imagine, most Fluenz users don't, we would never know that there were updates, since you don't let us know via email. Really, Fluenz, you've got all our information regarding version numbers and our email addresses. Why can't you send us a note (like every other software company does) with specific links to our update files? You do so many things right and I consider you a very good customer service company, so it's very surprising and disappointing that you continue to insist that your customers should bear the burden of an unfriendly update process. You can do better than this, Fluenz.

I think you folks continue to make the update process far more cumbersome for your customers than it needs to be. Consider that ...

1. You're the only software company I know of that insists that your users repeatedly dig out their old discs to locate the version number. Since we've told you in the past what our version number is, why can't you make this information easier for us to find so that we don't have to dig through closets and drawers to find our old discs?

2. I started going through the update process, and selected Italian from the pull-down menu. Since I didn't really want to find my old discs, I selected the "If you don't know your version number" link, and was told the version number of my SPANISH discs. What, exactly, was the point of selecting Italian?

3. After 35 minutes of looking, I found my old discs and identified the version number. It was, of course, not one of the version numbers available from the pull-down menu. But I was glad to see a link for those whose number was below v. 2.5. I selected this link, then downloaded Italian 2. When I double-clicked on the resulting file, I got an "Unidentified Developer" error.

Time invested in trying to update my software: 52 minutes. Results: no updates.

Finally, if you don't happen to use Fluenz Commons, which, I imagine, most Fluenz users don't, we would never know that there were updates, since you don't let us know via email.

Really, Fluenz, you've got all our information regarding version numbers and our email addresses. Why can't you send us a note (like every other software company does) with specific links to our update files? You do so many things right and I consider you a very good customer service company, so it's very surprising and disappointing that you continue to insist that your customers should bear the burden of an unfriendly update process. You can do better than this, Fluenz.

This question is unsolved
MelM
Thank you for your message. We're working hard on our new Fluenz version which will also involve a new method for updating your programs accordingly. Thank you for your patience while we work on getting this ready.

Thank you for your message. We're working hard on our new Fluenz version which will also involve a new method for updating your programs accordingly. Thank you for your patience while we work on getting this ready.

Post Comment
In level 2 lesson #26, I came across the sentence "Ayer fue el cumpleaños de mi colega." It's translated to mean "Yesterday was my colleague's birthday." So shouldn't the sentence read "Ayer ESTUVO el cumpleaños de mi colega"?

In level 2 lesson #26, I came across the sentence "Ayer fue el cumpleaños de mi colega." It's translated to mean "Yesterday was my colleague's birthday." So shouldn't the sentence read "Ayer ESTUVO el cumpleaños de mi colega"?

View all 7 comments
This question is unsolved
Robert D. Williams
Ser is often used in the sense of "take place" focusing on the action rather than location.

Ser is often used in the sense of "take place" focusing on the action rather than location.

Post Comment
I'm in Spanish 2, lesson 17 ... and I came across two things in the same sentence that confused me. The sentence is: "La proxima reunion es en la oficina de Sandra." First question: Why does "proxima" come before "reunion" in this example, whereas it comes after the noun in other contexts, such as "la semana proxima"? Second question: Why is the "ser" form of To Be used in this sentence? It's always been my understanding that in cases of location, the "estar" form is to be used?

I'm in Spanish 2, lesson 17 ... and I came across two things in the same sentence that confused me. The sentence is: "La proxima reunion es en la oficina de Sandra."

First question: Why does "proxima" come before "reunion" in this example, whereas it comes after the noun in other contexts, such as "la semana proxima"?

Second question: Why is the "ser" form of To Be used in this sentence? It's always been my understanding that in cases of location, the "estar" form is to be used?

This question is unsolved
2101
I have the very same question re: ser.

I have the very same question re: ser.

James Putney
For proxima, I think the general rule is that it comes before, except in cases of dates (weeks, months, years). As to the use of ser, see my response above, I agree in this case I think it would be estar, since the meeting could be held in different places.

For proxima, I think the general rule is that it comes before, except in cases of dates (weeks, months, years). As to the use of ser, see my response above, I agree in this case I think it would be estar, since the meeting could be held in different places.

Post Comment
In Spain Spanish level 2, lesson 6, I came across a sentence whose meaning is "We eat here a lot." Fluenz translates it as "Nosotros comemos mucho aqui." But as I look at that sentence in Spanish, it seems to say "We eat much here," as in ... a lot of food. So how would you translate into Spanish "We eat here often" as opposed to "We eat much (food) here."

In Spain Spanish level 2, lesson 6, I came across a sentence whose meaning is "We eat here a lot." Fluenz translates it as "Nosotros comemos mucho aqui." But as I look at that sentence in Spanish, it seems to say "We eat much here," as in ... a lot of food. So how would you translate into Spanish "We eat here often" as opposed to "We eat much (food) here."

View all 8 comments
This question is unsolved
Apolonia D.
Adverbs can be placed in different positions so you could also say "Nosotros comemos aquí mucho". The other option just sounds a bit more natural, but this is something you learn by speaking the language. Both sentences should be accepted though, so thanks for pointing it out.

Adverbs can be placed in different positions so you could also say "Nosotros comemos aquí mucho". The other option just sounds a bit more natural, but this is something you learn by speaking the language. Both sentences should be accepted though, so thanks for pointing it out.

Robert D. Williams
You can avoid this problem by using "frecuentemente." "Comemos aqui frequentemente>'

You can avoid this problem by using "frecuentemente." "Comemos aqui frequentemente>'

Post Comment
I'm in level 2 Spanish (Spain), and I've come across two different words that both mean "for." Example #1: Voy a comprar un billete PARA mi marido (I am going to buy a ticket FOR my husband). Example #2: Voy a viajar a Barcelona POR trabajar (I am going to travel to Barcelona FOR work. Is there a rule (or at least some logic) for when to use PARA and when to use POR? Thanks in advance for your help.

I'm in level 2 Spanish (Spain), and I've come across two different words that both mean "for." Example #1: Voy a comprar un billete PARA mi marido (I am going to buy a ticket FOR my husband). Example #2: Voy a viajar a Barcelona POR trabajar (I am going to travel to Barcelona FOR work.

Is there a rule (or at least some logic) for when to use PARA and when to use POR? Thanks in advance for your help.

View all 5 comments
This question is unsolved
Apolonia D.
I forgot to mention example 2 above is wrong, It should be "Voy a viajar a Barcelona por trabajo". El trabajo is the reason or cause why I'm travelling to Barcelona and to indicate a cause you always use "por".

I forgot to mention example 2 above is wrong, It should be "Voy a viajar a Barcelona por trabajo". El trabajo is the reason or cause why I'm travelling to Barcelona and to indicate a cause you always use "por".

DennisG
Thank you, Apolonia ... I appreciate your comment and correction. Very helpful

Thank you, Apolonia ... I appreciate your comment and correction. Very helpful

Post Comment
When I log in, my profile picture is displayed correctly. But it's squashed in my posts. Poor Mr. Burns!

When I log in, my profile picture is displayed correctly. But it's squashed in my posts. Poor Mr. Burns!

This question is unsolved
Daniel Olness
If you go into edit your profile it says "All images will be resized to 100 x 100 px" so if your image is not in those dimensions i.e. a square it will squashed

If you go into edit your profile it says "All images will be resized to 100 x 100 px" so if your image is not in those dimensions i.e. a square it will squashed

VSaunders
Hi, Dennis. Small world that we are both studying Italian.

Hi, Dennis. Small world that we are both studying Italian.

Post Comment
Oy vey. The position of "gia" and "ancora" in a sentence is a mind-bender. This was, without a doubt, the hardest lesson yet -- by far.

Oy vey.

The position of "gia" and "ancora" in a sentence is a mind-bender. This was, without a doubt, the hardest lesson yet -- by far.

This question is unsolved
cdo12346
I'm glad I saw this comment! I thought I was doing so well up to this point! I do think I will be doing this lesson just a few more times!

I'm glad I saw this comment! I thought I was doing so well up to this point! I do think I will be doing this lesson just a few more times!

Post Comment
1. In the chapter 14 conversation, we get this sentence: "Alle sei andiamo insieme alla fermata." Unless I'm wrong, we have never seen the word "insieme" before. 2. We also get this sentence: "La finestra del ristorante e dopo l' entrata." I don't remember having the word "finestra." 3. I've asked this question before, but got no response, so I'll try it again. In some cases the word "prossima" comes before "settimana," and in some cases it comes after it. What's the rule here? One final observation: I realize that this is only a beta of the Commons. But if you want to get people into the habit of using it regularly and considering it to be a valuable resource, you might want to make sure to check in here daily and answer people's questions. There are several questions that have gone unanswered for weeks.

1. In the chapter 14 conversation, we get this sentence: "Alle sei andiamo insieme alla fermata." Unless I'm wrong, we have never seen the word "insieme" before.

2. We also get this sentence: "La finestra del ristorante e dopo l' entrata." I don't remember having the word "finestra."

3. I've asked this question before, but got no response, so I'll try it again. In some cases the word "prossima" comes before "settimana," and in some cases it comes after it. What's the rule here?

One final observation: I realize that this is only a beta of the Commons. But if you want to get people into the habit of using it regularly and considering it to be a valuable resource, you might want to make sure to check in here daily and answer people's questions. There are several questions that have gone unanswered for weeks.

View all 9 comments
This question is unsolved
Joyce Dawson
Loved Italian One and Two. In Three I understand that we need to hear the language spoken as quickly as if we were native speakers in order to get used to the sounds, however the teacher enunciates some of the words differently than I am used to. Is there a reason for this, and if so did she mention that in the first tutorial that I may have missed?

Loved Italian One and Two. In Three I understand that we need to hear the language spoken as quickly as if we were native speakers in order to get used to the sounds, however the teacher enunciates some of the words differently than I am used to. Is there a reason for this, and if so did she mention that in the first tutorial that I may have missed?

Post Comment
Show More Posts
X