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Chillenoutkr

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Santa Clarita , CA
United States
I have a question about "j'ai" I have and "je dois" I must/have. One of the flashcards in level 2 lesson 18 says in English "I need to call my wife, so I have to charge my cellphone". The answer in French is "J’ai besoin d’appeler ma femme, donc je dois recharger mon portable". why is it je dois recharger and not j'ai recharger?

I have a question about "j'ai" I have and "je dois" I must/have. One of the flashcards in level 2 lesson 18 says in English "I need to call my wife, so I have to charge my cellphone". The answer in French is "J’ai besoin d’appeler ma femme, donc je dois recharger mon portable". why is it je dois recharger and not j'ai recharger?

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andy@fluenz
Great to hear. Eventually, when you get more advanced, you'll begin to learn similar sayings, but in the subjunctive such as "Il faut que je fasse" which are highly used in French. Don't worry too much about that yet. That will be after you complete all of Fluenz before you move on to such things. Just good to be aware though and in the meantime use "Je dois" or "J'ai besoin de"

Great to hear. Eventually, when you get more advanced, you'll begin to learn similar sayings, but in the subjunctive such as "Il faut que je fasse" which are highly used in French. Don't worry too much about that yet. That will be after you complete all of Fluenz before you move on to such things. Just good to be aware though and in the meantime use "Je dois" or "J'ai besoin de"

andy@fluenz
Hi, I think the confusion comes from literally translating "I have to" to the version "To have" rather than the obligation "I must". In English, if you say "I have an apple" for example, this is the verb "Avoir". If you say "I have to buy some apples" this would be the verb "Devoir" - I must buy some apples, I have to buy some apples, it's my obligation to buy apples. Does this make sense? It can be a bit tricky

Hi, I think the confusion comes from literally translating "I have to" to the version "To have" rather than the obligation "I must". In English, if you say "I have an apple" for example, this is the verb "Avoir". If you say "I have to buy some apples" this would be the verb "Devoir" - I must buy some apples, I have to buy some apples, it's my obligation to buy apples. Does this make sense? It can be a bit tricky

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je besoin de and je dois pretty much means the same thing so how can you tell which one to use.

je besoin de and je dois pretty much means the same thing so how can you tell which one to use.

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Emilie Poyet
On the one hand, it's true that we have the same difference as in English: Need/Avoir besoin de can be used with nouns (J'ai besoin d'eau/I need water) while must/devoir can't, it's always followed by a verb, as in: Je dois travailler/I must work OR I have to work ("have to" has no equivalent in French, the most common way is to use "devoir". On the other hand, Avoir besoin de/Need can also be used with verbs, as in: J'ai besoin de dormir /I need to sleep. So to sum up I'd say that: Avoir besoin de = To need Devoir = Must/ To have to Hope it clarifies a bit :)

On the one hand, it's true that we have the same difference as in English: Need/Avoir besoin de can be used with nouns (J'ai besoin d'eau/I need water) while must/devoir can't, it's always followed by a verb, as in: Je dois travailler/I must work OR I have to work ("have to" has no equivalent in French, the most common way is to use "devoir".
On the other hand, Avoir besoin de/Need can also be used with verbs, as in: J'ai besoin de dormir /I need to sleep.
So to sum up I'd say that:
Avoir besoin de = To need
Devoir = Must/ To have to
Hope it clarifies a bit :)

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level 2 lesson 9 flashcards - one of the flashcards starts off with vous pouvez m'apporter. why is it m'apporter and not m'apportez?

level 2 lesson 9 flashcards - one of the flashcards starts off with vous pouvez m'apporter. why is it m'apporter and not m'apportez?

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andy@fluenz
In this case, apporter is in the infinitive form and the verb pouvoir has already been conjugated (pouvez) after the vous. It would only be "apportez" as in "Vous apportez....quelque chose"... Hope this helps!

In this case, apporter is in the infinitive form and the verb pouvoir has already been conjugated (pouvez) after the vous. It would only be "apportez" as in "Vous apportez....quelque chose"... Hope this helps!

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I have a question about tu and toi. since both words mean the same thing how can you tell which one to use?

I have a question about tu and toi. since both words mean the same thing how can you tell which one to use?

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Chillenoutkr
Ok. Thank you for the explanation

Ok. Thank you for the explanation

Emilie Poyet
That's exact, Tu is the subject pronoun, so it is always right before a conjugated verb, while Toi is the emphatic pronoun, so it is used before "tu", generally to start a phrase. Toi is also the pronoun we use after prepositions (like Pour, Avec, Sans, À côté de etc etc) and after "Et": Et toi? *Same difference for Je/Moi, Il/Lui, Ils/Eux. The other pronouns don't change (Elle, Nous, Vous, Elles)

That's exact, Tu is the subject pronoun, so it is always right before a conjugated verb, while Toi is the emphatic pronoun, so it is used before "tu", generally to start a phrase. Toi is also the pronoun we use after prepositions (like Pour, Avec, Sans, À côté de etc etc) and after "Et": Et toi?
*Same difference for Je/Moi, Il/Lui, Ils/Eux. The other pronouns don't change (Elle, Nous, Vous, Elles)

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French Level 2 lesson 4- When Caroline went over the lesson she said that whenever the question"what" was inside a phrase to use "ce que" instead of "qu'est-ce que", and gave the example "Tu sais ce que tu veux manger". But when she went over the dialog "qu'est-ce que" was used in the middle of the following phrase- "Tres bien, et qu'est-ce que tu veux boire". Which is the correct one to use?

French Level 2 lesson 4- When Caroline went over the lesson she said that whenever the question"what" was inside a phrase to use "ce que" instead of "qu'est-ce que", and gave the example "Tu sais ce que tu veux manger". But when she went over the dialog "qu'est-ce que" was used in the middle of the following phrase- "Tres bien, et qu'est-ce que tu veux boire". Which is the correct one to use?

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andy@fluenz
Just a note, first off, regarding your other post, the Fluenz Commons is an open-source forum where we let users help other users, so if you don't have a response in a few days, please be patient.If you want to move your post up to become more visible to others, you can add an additional comment and it'll put it on top. Others from the team such as myself do answer questions when possible. To answer your question, Qu'est-ce que was used in the middle of the phrase, however, it was a new clause, which is the same as if it were at the beginning of a question. You wouldn't ever say "Tres bien, et ce que tu veux boire?" because of the "et" that comes before. Hope this helps!

Just a note, first off, regarding your other post, the Fluenz Commons is an open-source forum where we let users help other users, so if you don't have a response in a few days, please be patient.If you want to move your post up to become more visible to others, you can add an additional comment and it'll put it on top. Others from the team such as myself do answer questions when possible.
To answer your question, Qu'est-ce que was used in the middle of the phrase, however, it was a new clause, which is the same as if it were at the beginning of a question. You wouldn't ever say "Tres bien, et ce que tu veux boire?" because of the "et" that comes before. Hope this helps!

Emilie Poyet
"Qu'est-ce que" only translates the question word "what", so in the example you mention, it doesn't start the phrase, but it's as if it did, there's no real other "phrase" before it, just "très bien" + it comes after "et", so it could be a phrase of its own: "Qu'est-ce que tu veux boire?" Now, Whenever "what" is used as a relative pronoun to link two phrases together, (and NOT a question word), the translation is "ce que". For example: "I don't know what she wants" would be "Je ne sais pas ce qu'elle veut" "I understand what you want to say" = "Je comprends ce que tu veux dire" Note that contrary to the first one, they're not really questions + One trick that can help is that generally they couldn't be a phrase on their own (you can't just say "what she wants, what you want to say" right?), so whenever that happens you know you need "ce que" in French, and not "qu'est-ce que". Hope this helps!

"Qu'est-ce que" only translates the question word "what", so in the example you mention, it doesn't start the phrase, but it's as if it did, there's no real other "phrase" before it, just "très bien" + it comes after "et", so it could be a phrase of its own: "Qu'est-ce que tu veux boire?"
Now, Whenever "what" is used as a relative pronoun to link two phrases together, (and NOT a question word), the translation is "ce que".
For example: "I don't know what she wants" would be "Je ne sais pas ce qu'elle veut"
"I understand what you want to say" = "Je comprends ce que tu veux dire"
Note that contrary to the first one, they're not really questions + One trick that can help is that generally they couldn't be a phrase on their own (you can't just say "what she wants, what you want to say" right?), so whenever that happens you know you need "ce que" in French, and not "qu'est-ce que".
Hope this helps!

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On level 1 lesson 27 one of the flashcards says in engish "yes, but first i'm going take some money out", but you have to type "d'accord" instead of "oui" to get the flashcard right.

On level 1 lesson 27 one of the flashcards says in engish "yes, but first i'm going take some money out", but you have to type "d'accord" instead of "oui" to get the flashcard right.

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andy@fluenz
Thanks for reporting!

Thanks for reporting!

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This is getting really old.... Has anyone been getting logged out during a lesson for the last week or so? Come to think of it, the problem started right after the last update.

This is getting really old....

Has anyone been getting logged out during a lesson for the last week or so? Come to think of it, the problem started right after the last update.

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andy@fluenz
We haven't had any other reports of issues like this. Please email us directly at usersupport@fluenz.com and we'll help troubleshoot further. Be sure to include the web browser and OS that you're using.

We haven't had any other reports of issues like this. Please email us directly at usersupport@fluenz.com and we'll help troubleshoot further. Be sure to include the web browser and OS that you're using.

mshideler
That was my error a very short time back with the local installed version. I still get it today and don't use the local anymore. I just use the net version now and again.

That was my error a very short time back with the local installed version. I still get it today and don't use the local anymore. I just use the net version now and again.

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With the new French update I decided to do level 1 again. I do have a question about lesson 9. On the old version when a new verb was introduced Sonia would go over the conjugation. In the new version on lesson 9 voudrais was introduced. Il/Elle voulait, nous voulons, vous vouliez, and ils/elles voulaient wasn’t mentioned at all. Did I skip over a lesson explaining the conjugation or will it be addressed in future lessons?

With the new French update I decided to do level 1 again. I do have a question about lesson 9. On the old version when a new verb was introduced Sonia would go over the conjugation. In the new version on lesson 9 voudrais was introduced. Il/Elle voulait, nous voulons, vous vouliez, and ils/elles voulaient wasn’t mentioned at all. Did I skip over a lesson explaining the conjugation or will it be addressed in future lessons?

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Emilie Poyet
Hi Chillenoutkr, The only "complete" conjugation we teach for now for To want is that of the present tense (Je veux, Tu veux, Il/Elle veut, Nous voulons, Vous voulez, Ils/Elles veulent). Yet we decided to introduce "Je voudrais" (I would like) in the upgrade here because it is by far the most common way of asking for something at a restaurant, café or any shops... Since it is soo useful, we thought it was worth mentioning it from the first level, however, we don't want to get into the details of the complete conjugation in conditional tense. At this point we consider there are other "priorities" so we only get to this in higher levels. :)

Hi Chillenoutkr,
The only "complete" conjugation we teach for now for To want is that of the present tense (Je veux, Tu veux, Il/Elle veut, Nous voulons, Vous voulez, Ils/Elles veulent).
Yet we decided to introduce "Je voudrais" (I would like) in the upgrade here because it is by far the most common way of asking for something at a restaurant, café or any shops... Since it is soo useful, we thought it was worth mentioning it from the first level, however, we don't want to get into the details of the complete conjugation in conditional tense. At this point we consider there are other "priorities" so we only get to this in higher levels. :)

mshideler
"Il/Elle voulait, nous voulons, vous vouliez, and ils/elles voulaient " Nous voulons is talked about much earlier, Level 1 session 4, and is also present tense, "we want". Il / elle voulait, vous vouliez, ils / elles voulaient are all past tense, i.e. he / she wanted, you wanted, they wanted. Up to this point, level 1 session 9, there has not been any introduction to past tense. It is all present tense. I am not sure which session starts to introduce future tense but it isn't by session 9 but in a future session

"Il/Elle voulait, nous voulons, vous vouliez, and ils/elles voulaient "

Nous voulons is talked about much earlier, Level 1 session 4, and is also present tense, "we want".

Il / elle voulait, vous vouliez, ils / elles voulaient are all past tense, i.e. he / she wanted, you wanted, they wanted.

Up to this point, level 1 session 9, there has not been any introduction to past tense. It is all present tense. I am not sure which session starts to introduce future tense but it isn't by session 9 but in a future session

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Since the French upgrade I decided to do level 1 again. Theres's a lot of new grammar/sentence structure, but the flash cards are still the same. Are you guys planning to upgrade the flashcards too?

Since the French upgrade I decided to do level 1 again. Theres's a lot of new grammar/sentence structure, but the flash cards are still the same.

Are you guys planning to upgrade the flashcards too?

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andy@fluenz
They are new, just make sure you select the French Upgraded ones and not the original French flashcards

They are new, just make sure you select the French Upgraded ones and not the original French flashcards

Chillenoutkr
Ok. After I logged out and back in I now see the French upgrade Flashcards

Ok. After I logged out and back in I now see the French upgrade Flashcards

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The below statements are basically saying the same thing: J'y vais Je vais y aller So why isn't the "Y" in the same place?

The below statements are basically saying the same thing:
J'y vais
Je vais y aller
So why isn't the "Y" in the same place?

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Chillenoutkr
Can someone please answer this question for me?

Can someone please answer this question for me?

andy@fluenz
In the present tense, the y goes before the conjugated verb--vais in this case. In the future proche--vais+aller-- it goes before the verb in the infinitive (aller). The past tense also goes before the conjugated verb--j'y suis allé--(I went).

In the present tense, the y goes before the conjugated verb--vais in this case. In the future proche--vais+aller-- it goes before the verb in the infinitive (aller). The past tense also goes before the conjugated verb--j'y suis allé--(I went).

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