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carriesciammas

Posts: 0
Pleasanton, CA
United States
In the flashcard There are six pastry shops and two very good bakeries there, the correct answer is il y a six pâtisseries et deux très bonnes boulangeries là-bas, but would il y a six pâtisseries et deux très bonnes boulangeries-là also be correct?

In the flashcard There are six pastry shops and two very good bakeries there, the correct answer is il y a six pâtisseries et deux très bonnes boulangeries là-bas, but would il y a six pâtisseries et deux très bonnes boulangeries-là also be correct?

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Fabrice
I'm not sure how this is taught, but ici = here, là = there, là-bas = over there so I would have thought that là should be the correct one.

I'm not sure how this is taught, but ici = here, là = there, là-bas = over there so I would have thought that là should be the correct one.

Emilie Poyet
Hi carriesciammas, very good question! Là and Là-bas can be confusing because the translation is not so clear-cut, and they can both mean "there" or "over there" depending on the situation. The main nuance is that "là" is used for things that are closer to the speaker, generally things he/she can point at, while "là-bas" is rather used for distant things, that are far away from the speaker. For example if you refer to another city or country you'll always use "là-bas"... Yet many times they are interchangeable and depend on the speaker's point of view. In this example, you're right, the answer could be both: il y a six pâtisseries et deux très bonnes boulangeries là-bas AND il y a six pâtisseries et deux très bonnes boulangeries là Since the phrase is out of context we don't know if the speaker is referring to distant or close by shops, so both answers should be accepted and we'll make sure that they're both available. ***Watch out though: in this example there is no hyphen before "là" or "là-bas", you ONLY use hyphens in the structure: this thing here (cette chose-ci), that thing there (cette chose-là). When there is no This or That before (or these or those), then no hyphen is used. I hope this clears things up a little! Thanks for sharing and keep up the good work!

Hi carriesciammas, very good question!
Là and Là-bas can be confusing because the translation is not so clear-cut, and they can both mean "there" or "over there" depending on the situation. The main nuance is that "là" is used for things that are closer to the speaker, generally things he/she can point at, while "là-bas" is rather used for distant things, that are far away from the speaker. For example if you refer to another city or country you'll always use "là-bas"... Yet many times they are interchangeable and depend on the speaker's point of view.
In this example, you're right, the answer could be both:
il y a six pâtisseries et deux très bonnes boulangeries là-bas AND il y a six pâtisseries et deux très bonnes boulangeries là
Since the phrase is out of context we don't know if the speaker is referring to distant or close by shops, so both answers should be accepted and we'll make sure that they're both available.
***Watch out though: in this example there is no hyphen before "là" or "là-bas", you ONLY use hyphens in the structure: this thing here (cette chose-ci), that thing there (cette chose-là). When there is no This or That before (or these or those), then no hyphen is used.
I hope this clears things up a little! Thanks for sharing and keep up the good work!

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Why use avec in "des sandwichs au jambon avec de la moutarde" as opposed too "des sandwichs au jambon et a la moutarde" like in un crepe au chocolat et a la chantilly?

Why use avec in "des sandwichs au jambon avec de la moutarde" as opposed too "des sandwichs au jambon et a la moutarde" like in un crepe au chocolat et a la chantilly?

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Fabrice
To me both work. The only thing I can see is that you would put less moutarde in a ham sandwich than chantilly on a crepe, so the first one would be something like ham sandwich with added mustard (the ham sandwich is the main thing), and a chocolate with chantilly crepe (both ingredients are equal). But in French both are correct.

To me both work. The only thing I can see is that you would put less moutarde in a ham sandwich than chantilly on a crepe, so the first one would be something like ham sandwich with added mustard (the ham sandwich is the main thing), and a chocolate with chantilly crepe (both ingredients are equal). But in French both are correct.

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