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infinitive verbs and conjegated verbs

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ojosdeverdes
Posts: 0
belleplaine, mn
Registered:
Dec 2, 2015
Aug 21, 2017 at 4:56pm

Yes, I post a lot, and I thank all of you that have taken the time to respond. I have asked this question before in some form but I don't believe I ever received a definitive answer, so here goes: I'm close to the end of L1, (lesson 24) and still can't figure out why some verbs are used in their conjugated forms and others in their infinitive forms. If there's some formula at work, I'm not seeing it. If you've taken the lessons in level 1, you know what I'm referring to. A few examples: querer, ser, estar, hablar, among others all being used in their conjugated forms. Salir, pagar, comprar, comer, etc., all used in their infinitive forms. Is there a comprehensive answer to this question? It seems so random.
Thank you.

DennisG
Posts: 0
Seattle, WA
United States
Registered:
Jan 26, 2011
Aug 22, 2017 at 10:14am

It's a matter of context. Any one of those verbs you mention could be used in either an infinitive or conjugated form, depending on what else is happening in the sentence. For example, in English we might say, "I am going to eat at the restaurant." Note that there are two verbs in the sentence: "am" (a conjugated form of "to be") and "to eat" (an infinitive). Translated into Spanish, the sentence would read "Voy a comer en el restaurante." "Voy" is the conjugated form of "ir," while "comer" is in its infinitive form.

But, used in a different context, a conjugated verb might just as easily be used in its infinitive form. For example, the sentence "I eat food every day" would be translated to "Como comida todos los dias." Note that "comer" is conjugated in this example, while it was in its infinitive form in the previous one. A lot of verbs we learn in Spanish are used in their infinitive form when preceded in a sentence by "I am going ... to eat, to drink, to buy, to go, to do whatever." But when used without the preceding verb ("I am going ..."), we usually see the verbs conjugated, just as in English.

Does this finally clarify the issue for you?

ojosdeverdes
Posts: 0
belleplaine, mn
Registered:
Dec 2, 2015
Aug 22, 2017 at 4:23pm

It surely helps me make sense of it. That makes a lot of difference when I start to look at the context of the sentence. I guess my best course of section is to trust Fluenz on weather verbs are conjugated or not. Eventually, as I start to put my own expressions I would think it would start to come natural as to what forms I use my verbs. Thank you for helping me to understand this.

Sonia Gil
Posts: 0
Miami, FL
United States
Registered:
Sep 21, 2010
Aug 23, 2017 at 9:42am

Dennis is correct- any verb can be utilized conjugated or in the infinitive form depending on context. So for example you can say: She eats every morning. (in this case eats is conjugated). But you say: She likes TO eat every morning (in this case "likes" is conjugated, but "to eat" is in infinitive form). In Spanish we use verbs very much like English. You would never say "I to eat" in English, thus in Spanish you would never say "Yo comer".

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