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Grammar

I am confused with the following sentence. Can anyone explain? "Esa chaqueta es mejor porque es mucho más corta." in this sentence, Mucho is modifying corta, then shouldn't it be "mucha?" or when we modify only adjective, we use masculine form?

I am confused with the following sentence. Can anyone explain?
"Esa chaqueta es mejor porque es mucho más corta."
in this sentence, Mucho is modifying corta, then shouldn't it be "mucha?"
or when we modify only adjective, we use masculine form?

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How can I determine when to conjugate the verb as a reflexive verb and when to use the standard (non reflexive) conjugation. Is "she learns quickly" "ella se aprende rapido" or "ella aprende rapido?"

How can I determine when to conjugate the verb as a reflexive verb and when to use the standard (non reflexive) conjugation. Is "she learns quickly" "ella se aprende rapido" or "ella aprende rapido?"

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Experiences with Spanish

I remember some months ago when some people, myself included, were talking about the Spanish speakers speaking too fast, in one workout in particular in the upgraded version where the sentences build and get long and it's nearly impossible to understand what is being said, especially when they slur right past certain words. I was directed to a website where those having trouble could do the lessons and slow down the speakers. Is there such a site where we can slow down the speaker and, if so, can someone direct me to it? Thanks.

I remember some months ago when some people, myself included, were talking about the Spanish speakers speaking too fast, in one workout in particular in the upgraded version where the sentences build and get long and it's nearly impossible to understand what is being said, especially when they slur right past certain words. I was directed to a website where those having trouble could do the lessons and slow down the speakers. Is there such a site where we can slow down the speaker and, if so, can someone direct me to it? Thanks.

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I've just completed my last session of the final level of Fluenz Spanish (Latin, upgraded) just in time for new year! This topic has been touched on in previous posts, but I'm looking for any advise or information on formal study methods in order to pursue a more advanced level of Spanish. Fluenz is fantastic and I've done all the levels in about 20 months; whilst doing so I have been practising and talking with various native Spanish speakers and having finished Fluenz, I realise I know a great deal more in terms of gramatical structures and tenses than are included in the Fluenz course (I don't know the words to describe them, but for example the tense used in tener "que tengas un buen dia", or the way to say "I will do something", but not in the present tense, or using "Voy a", as Fluenz teaches you (so "Yo comeré" instead of "Voy a comer" or "Yo como"). Anyway, I'm considering options for formally studying Spanish, perhaps with a view of attaining some kind of qualification that I could include on my CV for example. I'm aware of the DELE qualification but don't know a lot about it. My main question would be what level of this qualification (i.e. A1, A2, B1 or B2 etc.) would be most suitable for someone in my position post-Fluenz? I tried a test on the DELE website which said my level would be B2, but I think I got lucky with some of the multiple choice questions and my knowledge of the above mentioned tense structures also assisted with that. So besides any advise in relation to DELE, I would love to discuss with people in a similar position what direction they went in to further their Spanish level (no need to advise about private tutors, watching movies or listening to music and immersion etc., I'm more interested in formal studying methods or materials/courses) - thanks a lot everybody! Josh

I've just completed my last session of the final level of Fluenz Spanish (Latin, upgraded) just in time for new year!
This topic has been touched on in previous posts, but I'm looking for any advise or information on formal study methods in order to pursue a more advanced level of Spanish.

Fluenz is fantastic and I've done all the levels in about 20 months; whilst doing so I have been practising and talking with various native Spanish speakers and having finished Fluenz, I realise I know a great deal more in terms of gramatical structures and tenses than are included in the Fluenz course (I don't know the words to describe them, but for example the tense used in tener "que tengas un buen dia", or the way to say "I will do something", but not in the present tense, or using "Voy a", as Fluenz teaches you (so "Yo comeré" instead of "Voy a comer" or "Yo como").

Anyway, I'm considering options for formally studying Spanish, perhaps with a view of attaining some kind of qualification that I could include on my CV for example. I'm aware of the DELE qualification but don't know a lot about it. My main question would be what level of this qualification (i.e. A1, A2, B1 or B2 etc.) would be most suitable for someone in my position post-Fluenz? I tried a test on the DELE website which said my level would be B2, but I think I got lucky with some of the multiple choice questions and my knowledge of the above mentioned tense structures also assisted with that.

So besides any advise in relation to DELE, I would love to discuss with people in a similar position what direction they went in to further their Spanish level (no need to advise about private tutors, watching movies or listening to music and immersion etc., I'm more interested in formal studying methods or materials/courses) - thanks a lot everybody!

Josh

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Travel + Culture

Hello everyone, I am about to finish Spanish Latin America Level 2 and Sonia made a comment at the end one of the lessons about watching a movie called "Volver" with Penelope Cruz. I was wondering if any of you know of some Spanish films or TV Series (with the option of subtitles), that you would recommend watching in the journey of learning Spanish. Thanks!!

Hello everyone,

I am about to finish Spanish Latin America Level 2 and Sonia made a comment at the end one of the lessons about watching a movie called "Volver" with Penelope Cruz. I was wondering if any of you know of some Spanish films or TV Series (with the option of subtitles), that you would recommend watching in the journey of learning Spanish. Thanks!!

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If anyone here wants a good TV Show to learn Spanish with, Club de Cuervos is awesome if you have Netflix. It's jointly made between American and Mexican producers/writers and it's pretty hilarious. It is in Spanish with English subtitles. It's humor/material is R rated so I would put the little ones to bed for it. Maturity level what you would expect from an HBO series like Eastbound and Down. That being said, you will learn quite a bit of Spanish probably not covered in Fluenz...:).

If anyone here wants a good TV Show to learn Spanish with, Club de Cuervos is awesome if you have Netflix. It's jointly made between American and Mexican producers/writers and it's pretty hilarious. It is in Spanish with English subtitles. It's humor/material is R rated so I would put the little ones to bed for it. Maturity level what you would expect from an HBO series like Eastbound and Down. That being said, you will learn quite a bit of Spanish probably not covered in Fluenz...:).

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Session by Session

In lesson 12 "Match the words" there are two examples that are a bit confusing to me. "¿Cuál es su nombre?" and "¿Cuál es su oficina?" The correct answer provided "What's her name" and the second correct answer provided is "Which one is his office." Shouldn't the correct answers be: "What's his/her name" and "Which one is his/her office" since su can be used for either one?

In lesson 12 "Match the words" there are two examples that are a bit confusing to me.

"¿Cuál es su nombre?" and "¿Cuál es su oficina?" The correct answer provided "What's her name" and the second correct answer provided is "Which one is his office." Shouldn't the correct answers be: "What's his/her name" and "Which one is his/her office" since su can be used for either one?

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In the "Write the word you read" section... "English-Inglés." Shouldn't it be "English-inglés" without the capitalization for inglés? Thanks.

In the "Write the word you read" section...

"English-Inglés."

Shouldn't it be "English-inglés" without the capitalization for inglés?

Thanks.

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