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I am confusing direct and indirect object pronouns? Any fast tips to get them into my head? Also: having trouble with syntax with direct and indirect object pronouns (more with the indirect). Any recommendations on how to the Italian sentence structure (the order of the words)?

I am confusing direct and indirect object pronouns? Any fast tips to get them into my head? Also: having trouble with syntax with direct and indirect object pronouns (more with the indirect). Any recommendations on how to the Italian sentence structure (the order of the words)?

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I am confused that an apostrophe isn't needed in the following sentence: "OK, qual `e la Sua camera?" I would have thought the correct form would be "OK, qual' `e la Sua camera?" Can someone please explain this for me? Thanks!l

I am confused that an apostrophe isn't needed in the following sentence: "OK, qual `e la Sua camera?" I would have thought the correct form would be "OK, qual' `e la Sua camera?" Can someone please explain this for me? Thanks!l

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Just to be sure I get this right and i'm not confusing things. Primo is only used when making reference to dishes, and prima means "first" when alone, and "before" in "prima di". Is that correct? Thanks!

Just to be sure I get this right and i'm not confusing things. Primo is only used when making reference to dishes, and prima means "first" when alone, and "before" in "prima di". Is that correct?

Thanks!

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Why does ancora not come at the end of a sentence. For example. "Non sono ancora stato alla cattedrale centrale" Which means: (I haven't been to the central cathedral yet). Also, why do you use non sono stato instead of non ho stato to say "I havn't been..."

Why does ancora not come at the end of a sentence. For example. "Non sono ancora stato alla cattedrale centrale" Which means: (I haven't been to the central cathedral yet). Also, why do you use non sono stato instead of non ho stato to say "I havn't been..."

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Ciao! I am currently in Level 5 and I am having difficulty with when to use ero/era as opposed to using sono stato/stata. I am listening to a lot of native speakers in podcasts and I can't quite seem to find a rule that sticks. For example, the phrase "Era in italia" vs "sono stata in italia". I hear it both ways quite a bit. Any tips?

Ciao! I am currently in Level 5 and I am having difficulty with when to use ero/era as opposed to using sono stato/stata. I am listening to a lot of native speakers in podcasts and I can't quite seem to find a rule that sticks. For example, the phrase "Era in italia" vs "sono stata in italia". I hear it both ways quite a bit. Any tips?

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In earlier levels of Italian we were taught to always use the article + noun (Ex: di primo, desidero gli spaghetti) and now in Level 5 it seems that articles are often left out. Maybe I missed something in Levels 3 and 4? For example, "mi piace il caffe ma per la colazione preferito bere latte". Why not il latte? Also, as an example, "ordinavo spaghetti" but not "ordinavo gli spaghetti"...... Is there a specific rule for when to use an article and when we do not? Or is it just one of those learn it by memorization things.....?

In earlier levels of Italian we were taught to always use the article + noun (Ex: di primo, desidero gli spaghetti) and now in Level 5 it seems that articles are often left out. Maybe I missed something in Levels 3 and 4? For example, "mi piace il caffe ma per la colazione preferito bere latte". Why not il latte? Also, as an example, "ordinavo spaghetti" but not "ordinavo gli spaghetti"...... Is there a specific rule for when to use an article and when we do not? Or is it just one of those learn it by memorization things.....?

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Im confused as to when to use vostro instead of tuo

Im confused as to when to use vostro instead of tuo

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I'm sure this is a simple question (it came up in both level 1 and 2, and still confused) - It is "che cosa vuole da bere", and yet "non so che cosa mangiare". Why not "non so che cosa da mangiare"? (or even che cosa a mangiare?)

I'm sure this is a simple question (it came up in both level 1 and 2, and still confused) -
It is "che cosa vuole da bere", and yet "non so che cosa mangiare". Why not "non so che cosa da mangiare"? (or even che cosa a mangiare?)

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Are all of these forms correct, assuming it is a woman speaking?: Ho dovuto sedermi. Mi sono dovuta sedere. Sono dovuta sedermi

Are all of these forms correct, assuming it is a woman speaking?: Ho dovuto sedermi. Mi sono dovuta sedere. Sono dovuta sedermi

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I don't remember a certain rule for this but why is it: A che ora deve partire quell' aereo? (At what time must that plane leave) and not A Che ora deve quell' aero partire? Why does it translate to "at what time must to leave that plane?

I don't remember a certain rule for this but why is it: A che ora deve partire quell' aereo? (At what time must that plane leave) and not A Che ora deve quell' aero partire? Why does it translate to "at what time must to leave that plane?

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