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I have a question about one of the exercises. In Match the words the phrase is "ist das die Nummer des Studenten" and the answer is "Is that the Student's(m) number" So, I know this is the genitive. If we are talking about male students (plural) isn't it die Studenten so shouldn't it be der Studenten for the genitive case and not des Studenten?

I have a question about one of the exercises. In Match the words the phrase is "ist das die Nummer des Studenten" and the answer is "Is that the Student's(m) number" So, I know this is the genitive. If we are talking about male students (plural) isn't it die Studenten so shouldn't it be der Studenten for the genitive case and not des Studenten?

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Can someone please help me understand the grammar in this sentence "ich warte auf dich in berlin vor dem neuen museum". with the time, manner and place rule both "in berlin" and "vor dem neuen hotel" are places so how do you choose which one goes in which word position?

Can someone please help me understand the grammar in this sentence "ich warte auf dich in berlin vor dem neuen museum". with the time, manner and place rule both "in berlin" and "vor dem neuen hotel" are places so how do you choose which one goes in which word position?

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I am currently on lesson 8 on the German 3 level and the lecture video cut off before finishing the explanation of the sentence, "Ich fliege denach nach Hause." I wasn't sure if anyone reported this yet, but wanted to bring it to the Fluenz team's attention. Edit: The video did explain a part of the sentence earlier, but it cut off so quickly I thought it might be a bug

I am currently on lesson 8 on the German 3 level and the lecture video cut off before finishing the explanation of the sentence, "Ich fliege denach nach Hause." I wasn't sure if anyone reported this yet, but wanted to bring it to the Fluenz team's attention.

Edit: The video did explain a part of the sentence earlier, but it cut off so quickly I thought it might be a bug

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Has anyone else noticed that the date math in the dialogue is wrong? Today is April 30th according to the dialogue, but then May 8th is a Friday. However, since April only has 30 days, May 8th should be a Thursday. It seems like the person that wrote the dialogue thought that April has 31 days.

Has anyone else noticed that the date math in the dialogue is wrong? Today is April 30th according to the dialogue, but then May 8th is a Friday. However, since April only has 30 days, May 8th should be a Thursday. It seems like the person that wrote the dialogue thought that April has 31 days.

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For the flash card: "Hi Julia. How are you(i)?" the only accepted answer is "Hallo Julia. Wie geht's?" I believe that "Hallo Julia. Wie geht's dir?" should also be acceptable.

For the flash card: "Hi Julia. How are you(i)?" the only accepted answer is "Hallo Julia. Wie geht's?" I believe that "Hallo Julia. Wie geht's dir?" should also be acceptable.

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In the "Write the phrase you read" section: The answer to "Can I leave me car here?" is shown as "Kann ich mein Auto hier lassen?" But should this not be "Kann ich hier mein Auto lassen?" as time, manner and place are supposed to come before the direct object noun. For the next phrase "Can I leave me car on the parking lot?" the answer is shown as "Kann ich auf dem Parkplatz mein Auto lassen?" which does put the direct object noun after the place.

In the "Write the phrase you read" section:

The answer to "Can I leave me car here?" is shown as "Kann ich mein Auto hier lassen?" But should this not be "Kann ich hier mein Auto lassen?" as time, manner and place are supposed to come before the direct object noun.

For the next phrase "Can I leave me car on the parking lot?" the answer is shown as "Kann ich auf dem Parkplatz mein Auto lassen?" which does put the direct object noun after the place.

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In the Repeat the phrases section of German 2, session 22, there is the sentence "Der nette Mann im Auto hat keinen Führerschein." However, we haven't encountered the adjective "nett" for "nice" yet in German 1 or 2. I'm guessing it is coming up soon due to Sonia's closing statement about lots of adjectives coming up. =)

In the Repeat the phrases section of German 2, session 22, there is the sentence "Der nette Mann im Auto hat keinen Führerschein." However, we haven't encountered the adjective "nett" for "nice" yet in German 1 or 2. I'm guessing it is coming up soon due to Sonia's closing statement about lots of adjectives coming up. =)

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There are two small typos in German 2, Session 15 in "Write the phrase you read". In two different phrases, the first 'h' is missing from "Toothbrush": I use a red tootbrush I use a red tootbrush and white toothpaste

There are two small typos in German 2, Session 15 in "Write the phrase you read". In two different phrases, the first 'h' is missing from "Toothbrush":
I use a red tootbrush
I use a red tootbrush and white toothpaste

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In the Repeat the Words section one of the phrases was: Der heißere Sommer - The hotter summer I understand the adjective heißer ending in e here as the article Der indicates the noun gender (M). Out of curiosity I wanted to check my understanding of adjective endings when the article is indefinite. In this case I believe that the adjective has to carry the mark of the nouns gender so I expected: A hotter summer -> Ein heißerer Sommer But when I entered that phrase in both Google Translator and Microsoft Translator I got two different answers neither using heißerer Microsoft: Einen heißeren Sommer Google: Ein heißer Sommer What is the correct translation?

In the Repeat the Words section one of the phrases was:

Der heißere Sommer - The hotter summer

I understand the adjective heißer ending in e here as the article Der indicates the noun gender (M).

Out of curiosity I wanted to check my understanding of adjective endings when the article is indefinite. In this case I believe that the adjective has to carry the mark of the nouns gender so I expected:

A hotter summer -> Ein heißerer Sommer

But when I entered that phrase in both Google Translator and Microsoft Translator I got two different answers neither using heißerer

Microsoft: Einen heißeren Sommer
Google: Ein heißer Sommer

What is the correct translation?

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There is a typo in the match phrases of this section (German 2, section 17): "Müssen wir Bier mibringen?" Instead of "Müssen wir Bier mitbringen?"

There is a typo in the match phrases of this section (German 2, section 17):

"Müssen wir Bier mibringen?"

Instead of

"Müssen wir Bier mitbringen?"

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