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At Fluenz German 3 lesson 11 there's a question form that I don't understand. Gibt es Milch in diesen Gerichten? Why don't we use just in diesen Gerichte?

At Fluenz German 3 lesson 11 there's a question form that I don't understand.
Gibt es Milch in diesen Gerichten?
Why don't we use just in diesen Gerichte?

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I have no idea how to understand the German cases. The way it is explained doesn't make much sense to me. I have taken German in High School and my teacher taught the same way Sonia does and nothing ever clicked. Just when I start understanding why a structure does this and why it is, it is suddenly skewed. My brain almost needs a rule of thumb to follow in order to understand. Does anyone have a way to remember how to tell between the cases that simply made more sense to them?

I have no idea how to understand the German cases. The way it is explained doesn't make much sense to me. I have taken German in High School and my teacher taught the same way Sonia does and nothing ever clicked. Just when I start understanding why a structure does this and why it is, it is suddenly skewed. My brain almost needs a rule of thumb to follow in order to understand. Does anyone have a way to remember how to tell between the cases that simply made more sense to them?

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I took two years of German in high school,but that was 48 years ago ,so I decided it would be best to start fluenz German from the beginning. I do have a question. In the lessons so far typical examples are "Wo ist die Bank? Die ist da drueben. Wo ist der Bahnhof. Der ist hier." Based on what I learned years ago I would have replied "Sie ist da drueben. Er ist hier." Have I got it wrong or are "sie' and "er" acceptable alternatives to using "die" and "der" in this situation.

I took two years of German in high school,but that was 48 years ago ,so I decided it would be best to start fluenz German from the beginning. I do have a question. In the lessons so far typical examples are "Wo ist die Bank? Die ist da drueben. Wo ist der Bahnhof. Der ist hier." Based on what I learned years ago I would have replied "Sie ist da drueben. Er ist hier." Have I got it wrong or are "sie' and "er" acceptable alternatives to using "die" and "der" in this situation.

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I'm not sure how to ask this question or clarification. I am on level 3 and so far we are using die, das and der for things when we say something like "It is small". If "it" is, for example, something masculine to say "Der ist klein". I am also taking a German class, taught by a native German, and we have been told to say "Er ist klein" using er, sie or es for whatever the gender is of the "thing". I kind of suggested to her how I am learning it in Fluenz and she said that was not correct. Am I misunderstanding something?

I'm not sure how to ask this question or clarification. I am on level 3 and so far we are using die, das and der for things when we say something like "It is small". If "it" is, for example, something masculine to say "Der ist klein". I am also taking a German class, taught by a native German, and we have been told to say "Er ist klein" using er, sie or es for whatever the gender is of the "thing". I kind of suggested to her how I am learning it in Fluenz and she said that was not correct. Am I misunderstanding something?

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Why are we taught not using the literal translation? Example: "möchten sie zum supermarkt gehen?" is translated to "do you want to go to the supermarket?" In reality though, this translates to "want you to the supermarket go" correct? Why are we not just taught that instead of re-arranging the sentence to fit our English paradigm? I mean, once over the hump of learning the different structure, it seems it would be much easier to learn the language in the proper order instead of re-organizing it all in your head?

Why are we taught not using the literal translation? Example:

"möchten sie zum supermarkt gehen?" is translated to "do you want to go to the supermarket?"

In reality though, this translates to "want you to the supermarket go" correct? Why are we not just taught that instead of re-arranging the sentence to fit our English paradigm? I mean, once over the hump of learning the different structure, it seems it would be much easier to learn the language in the proper order instead of re-organizing it all in your head?

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Are there any plans to incorporate the simple past, imperative, and more constructions with the verb "werden" into the Fluenz program? I am very happy with what I am learning with the Fluenz program, but I find that when I take a look at grammar books, different aspects of the language are covered.

Are there any plans to incorporate the simple past, imperative, and more constructions with the verb "werden" into the Fluenz program?
I am very happy with what I am learning with the Fluenz program, but I find that when I take a look at grammar books, different aspects of the language are covered.

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Gute Nacht. Wie viel kostet diesen Stadtplan oder wie viel kostet dieser Stadtplan? Welche ist richtig?

Gute Nacht. Wie viel kostet diesen Stadtplan oder wie viel kostet dieser Stadtplan? Welche ist richtig?

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Does anyone have any tips for the best way to use flashcards to retain currency? I find that i use in blocks, get close to being able to get 90 plus percent on each level, move on to another level, go back to the earlier level and fall back to about 70/100. Also, is it possible to do flashcards combining levels?

Does anyone have any tips for the best way to use flashcards to retain currency? I find that i use in blocks, get close to being able to get 90 plus percent on each level, move on to another level, go back to the earlier level and fall back to about 70/100.

Also, is it possible to do flashcards combining levels?

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Hello. So I see we have to use the preposition "auf" with "warten" (to wait for). But when we buy something for someone, we have to use the preposition für, as in "für sie." When do we use "auf" and when do we use "für?"

Hello. So I see we have to use the preposition "auf" with "warten" (to wait for).

But when we buy something for someone, we have to use the preposition für, as in "für sie."

When do we use "auf" and when do we use "für?"

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In Level 3, Lesson 8, the workout sentence is "Are they expensive" - (tickets) and the German shows as "Sind die teuer". Why is that? I thought it would be "Sind sie teuer". Is it because Tickets are plural and so you use die, I just thought it would be sie for "they". If you use "the tickets", it would be Sind die Karten teuer, so is it just the same idea, just not saying the word tickets? It just sounds awkward to say Sind die teuer.

In Level 3, Lesson 8, the workout sentence is "Are they expensive" - (tickets) and the German shows as "Sind die teuer". Why is that? I thought it would be "Sind sie teuer". Is it because Tickets are plural and so you use die, I just thought it would be sie for "they". If you use "the tickets", it would be Sind die Karten teuer, so is it just the same idea, just not saying the word tickets? It just sounds awkward to say Sind die teuer.

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