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Pronunciation with -en words.

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peter.kripp
Posts: 0
Bellingham, WA
Registered:
Dec 5, 2018
Feb 11, 2019 at 8:41pm

I am at German Level 2 Session 8. During the last few sessions I have noticed that the German speakers sometimes don't pronounce the -en at the end of some words. In particular this has come up with the words Ihnen, Personen, and einen. This seems to only happen in certain contexts. When I practice speaking I always pronounce these out so that the -en is still heard. Is this pronunciation important? Should I drop the -en sounds when I don't hear it pronounced in the listening exercises? This has brought a little confusion so wanted to ask and clarify. Thanks.

andy@fluenz
Posts: 0
France
United States
Registered:
Feb 6, 2011
Feb 14, 2019 at 10:58am

Hi Peter, You'll come across various pronunciations depending on the region the person comes from and their accent, so you can continue to pronounce them with the ending. Check out this site here to listen to different people's pronunciations of any word you'd like to hear: https://forvo.com/languages/de/

Emilie Poyet
Posts: 0
Barcelona, Catalunya
United States
Registered:
Dec 1, 2010
Feb 15, 2019 at 6:27am

Hi Peter, Andy is right, like in most languages, pronunciation varies across borders and people, which explains these differences. Now in the particular case you're mentioning, my sensation is that when speaking at natural pace or fast pace, German native speakers tend to "swallow" the EN endings, to pronounce it faster, they drop the "E" so sometimes you might just hear a quick final "N" or nothing at all. My advice for you would be to keep pronouncing it though, it is perfectly correct and this way you make sure people will clearly understand you, especially as a beginner. Little by little, with practice, you will reach a more natural pronunciation and accent by imitating more and more, and these little "shortcuts" when speaking come with time, but it's great that you're already able to spot them! tschüss!

peter.kripp
Posts: 0
Bellingham, WA
Registered:
Dec 5, 2018
Feb 15, 2019 at 5:18pm

Thank you to both of you. That is very helpful advise and I will proceed accordingly.

peter.kripp
Posts: 0
Bellingham, WA
Registered:
Dec 5, 2018
Feb 15, 2019 at 5:18pm

Thank you to both of you. That is very helpful advise and I will proceed accordingly.

peter.kripp
Posts: 0
Bellingham, WA
Registered:
Dec 5, 2018
Feb 15, 2019 at 5:18pm

Thank you to both of you. That is very helpful advise and I will proceed accordingly.

Lee R
Posts: 0
United States
Registered:
Nov 30, 2012
Feb 17, 2019 at 4:23pm

I've noticed similar issues with spanish. Makes it a little difficult to follow the native speaker as well as being able to have a conversation with a native speaker. Plus the native speakers sometimes slur 2 words into one. I guess it'll take a lot of time to be able to follow native speakers in both the computer course as well as television, movies, and radio programs.

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