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I was wondering if you guys are working on a French Immersion Class like the one you have for Spanish???

I was wondering if you guys are working on a French Immersion Class like the one you have for Spanish???

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Carolyn Janin speaks of French music artists in French-1, session 6, the conclusion. Could someone list them.

Carolyn Janin speaks of French music artists in French-1, session 6, the conclusion. Could someone list them.

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In French Level 5, Lesson 27, one of the phrases is "Comment tu t'appelles?" I'm curious to know, is there ever a time when it would be appropriate to use the familiar from of you with a person whose name you don't know? I ask this as an American who's never been to France and is wrestling a bit with the question of at what point in a relationship does one change from "vous" to "tu"? But surely it must be after names have been exchanged, no?

In French Level 5, Lesson 27, one of the phrases is "Comment tu t'appelles?" I'm curious to know, is there ever a time when it would be appropriate to use the familiar from of you with a person whose name you don't know? I ask this as an American who's never been to France and is wrestling a bit with the question of at what point in a relationship does one change from "vous" to "tu"? But surely it must be after names have been exchanged, no?

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Hello, I have a couple general questions regarding French culture. About a year ago, I was traveling extensively in Spain and managed to pull a day trip to the French Basque country. In one town, I had a magnificent experience. In fact, it really inspired me to learn the French language more seriously (as I am doing now with Fluenz). Later that day, however, my friend and I continued on to the town of Biarritz. It was there that locals stared at us harshly. Store owners literally closed their doors in our faces. No one would talk to us in French, Spanish, nor English for that matter. It was like walking through a ghost town. My father had warned me about this kind of thing, but I never imagined I would actually encounter such arrogance, much less in a seaside town. For what it's worth, I majored in anthropology in college so I am used to working with diverse peoples and cultures. We were very respectful, and not 'ignorant tourists.' At any rate, I still find the French language beautiful and I want to give France a second chance. Though, my limited and somewhat traumatic experience has left me very conflicted about the country and culture. So, I am wondering, has anyone else had this kind of experience? Or can anyone help me better understand it? Are there well-known explanations for this kind of thing that I am not aware of? The cause for my question is that an opportunity has presented itself for me to live in France temporarily. I am currently carrying some apprehension regarding whether I want to do it or not. I don't want this to be a 'hate on the French' post, because some of my good friends are French. Plus, I'm sure the same experience could happen here in the states. Perhaps others that have traveled around France could enlighten me on whether my experience was a fluke, or if the stereotype is widely true about arrogance being central to their culture. My decision to take the job in France (location unknown) is pending, so your help is greatly appreciated! Sincerely, Matt

Hello,

I have a couple general questions regarding French culture. About a year ago, I was traveling extensively in Spain and managed to pull a day trip to the French Basque country. In one town, I had a magnificent experience. In fact, it really inspired me to learn the French language more seriously (as I am doing now with Fluenz). Later that day, however, my friend and I continued on to the town of Biarritz. It was there that locals stared at us harshly. Store owners literally closed their doors in our faces. No one would talk to us in French, Spanish, nor English for that matter. It was like walking through a ghost town. My father had warned me about this kind of thing, but I never imagined I would actually encounter such arrogance, much less in a seaside town. For what it's worth, I majored in anthropology in college so I am used to working with diverse peoples and cultures. We were very respectful, and not 'ignorant tourists.'

At any rate, I still find the French language beautiful and I want to give France a second chance. Though, my limited and somewhat traumatic experience has left me very conflicted about the country and culture. So, I am wondering, has anyone else had this kind of experience? Or can anyone help me better understand it? Are there well-known explanations for this kind of thing that I am not aware of?

The cause for my question is that an opportunity has presented itself for me to live in France temporarily. I am currently carrying some apprehension regarding whether I want to do it or not. I don't want this to be a 'hate on the French' post, because some of my good friends are French. Plus, I'm sure the same experience could happen here in the states. Perhaps others that have traveled around France could enlighten me on whether my experience was a fluke, or if the stereotype is widely true about arrogance being central to their culture. My decision to take the job in France (location unknown) is pending, so your help is greatly appreciated!

Sincerely,
Matt

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I'm presently working in French, Level 5, Lesson 15 which deals with filling out official forms and use of terms such as first name, last name (family name), and middle name. Working with this vocabulary reminded me of the first French film I ever saw in a theater: Costa-Gravas's Z. For anyone who hasn't yet seen it, I recommend it highly. It's incredibly exciting as well as thought provoking. Without giving too much away, I will say that the plot involves, among other things, a magistrate who is investigating an assassination. When he interviews witnesses and suspects, the interviews begin with him asking: "Nom, prénom, profession." As the investigation picks up speed, the interviews of suspects become more rapid. As one after another of the suspects come through the door we hear the words "nom, prénom, profession," accompanied by the amazing score by Miklis Theodorakis which becomes more and more urgent while we watch the ball of a selectric typewriter speed across the screen. This may not sound very exciting, but I assure you that my heart was racing when I first saw this film and, in my opinion, it hasn't lost any of its power in the ensuing years. I encourage you to give it a chance.

I'm presently working in French, Level 5, Lesson 15 which deals with filling out official forms and use of terms such as first name, last name (family name), and middle name. Working with this vocabulary reminded me of the first French film I ever saw in a theater: Costa-Gravas's Z. For anyone who hasn't yet seen it, I recommend it highly. It's incredibly exciting as well as thought provoking.

Without giving too much away, I will say that the plot involves, among other things, a magistrate who is investigating an assassination. When he interviews witnesses and suspects, the interviews begin with him asking: "Nom, prénom, profession." As the investigation picks up speed, the interviews of suspects become more rapid. As one after another of the suspects come through the door we hear the words "nom, prénom, profession," accompanied by the amazing score by Miklis Theodorakis which becomes more and more urgent while we watch the ball of a selectric typewriter speed across the screen.

This may not sound very exciting, but I assure you that my heart was racing when I first saw this film and, in my opinion, it hasn't lost any of its power in the ensuing years. I encourage you to give it a chance.

I was hoping I could find any movies (family friendly) while I study French

I was hoping I could find any movies (family friendly) while I study French

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Bonjour mes amies. Je finis mon etude French 1. C'est tres bon, mais Je suis dans etats unis et Je (dont have anyone) parler avec. Just finished french 1. Going to france in October. Anyone interested in having real (typed conversations) to practice french 1?

Bonjour mes amies. Je finis mon etude French 1. C'est tres bon, mais Je suis dans etats unis et Je (dont have anyone) parler avec.

Just finished french 1. Going to france in October. Anyone interested in having real (typed conversations) to practice french 1?

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Last year I did all 150 lessons of Fluenz French. This year I am doing Fluenz Italian. Does anybody have any tips on how to keep up (maintain) both languages. I'm finding it very difficult and confusing, so I end up just focusing on the Italian for now Brian

Last year I did all 150 lessons of Fluenz French. This year I am doing Fluenz Italian. Does anybody have any tips on how to keep up (maintain) both languages. I'm finding it very difficult and confusing, so I end up just focusing on the Italian for now

Brian

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Does anyone have any tips on learning how to convert dollars to euros in their heads? If I go to France, how will I know if i'm getting a good deal or if i'm getting ripped off? Merci...

Does anyone have any tips on learning how to convert dollars to euros in their heads? If I go to France, how will I know if i'm getting a good deal or if i'm getting ripped off? Merci...

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I have completed Fluenz French 3. The word garçon is being used for waiter. I have read online that addressing a waiter as garçon is now considered an insult. If this is true why is this word still being used to address waiter in the Fluenz French program? In a restaurant in France or Quebec how should I address a waiter or a waitress?

I have completed Fluenz French 3. The word garçon is being used for waiter. I have read online that addressing a waiter as garçon is now considered an insult. If this is true why is this word still being used to address waiter in the Fluenz French program? In a restaurant in France or Quebec how should I address a waiter or a waitress?

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