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Hi Andy: I have just come across the review and comments by Zac Hilliker. They are very sensible. I wrote some similar suggestions some years ago when I was doing Spanish; but they never were put into effect. Your programme is very successful,so far as it goes. I like the build-up at every stage, and find most of the practice exercises useful. But once one memorises the vocabulary, there is not enough emphasis on using the language for conversation. The exercises and flash cards build slowly from single words, and this is very useful at the beginning, but for conversation one needs quick responses to complex sentences. For this, I find the last exercise most helpful (Repeat the Phrases). I close my eyes and press repeat for each phrase and then try to repeat what was said and then make the translation and where appropriate try to formulate a response. The flash cards are frustrating because so much time and space is given to single words and phrases which are easy; and the flash cards use the same sentences as were in the exercises. What I suggested some years ago was that your staff have a festive meeting with lots of drinks; and start with the words/phrases important at every stage and come up with new and original full sentences. Then you could create a new flashcard programme (which you can sell as a supplement) of advanced flashcards consisting only of these complex new sentences. The important thing is to learn the ability to quickly comprehend a complex thought and try to respond to it. From my point of view it is easy to react to single words and phrases, but the more complex the sentence, the harder it gets to remember the beginning by the time I reach the end — and then to format an adequate response. I do not know much about programming, but you have the flashcard template. Surely it would not be too difficult to remove the current content and substitute new original complex sentences which can then be separately sold. Cheers. Archie

Hi Andy:
I have just come across the review and comments by Zac Hilliker. They are very sensible. I wrote some similar suggestions some years ago when I was doing Spanish; but they never were put into effect.
Your programme is very successful,so far as it goes. I like the build-up at every stage, and find most of the practice exercises useful. But once one memorises the vocabulary, there is not enough emphasis on using the language for conversation. The exercises and flash cards build slowly from single words, and this is very useful at the beginning, but for conversation one needs quick responses to complex sentences. For this, I find the last exercise most helpful (Repeat the Phrases). I close my eyes and press repeat for each phrase and then try to repeat what was said and then make the translation and where appropriate try to formulate a response. The flash cards are frustrating because so much time and space is given to single words and phrases which are easy; and the flash cards use the same sentences as were in the
exercises.
What I suggested some years ago was that your staff have a festive meeting with lots of drinks; and start with the words/phrases important at every stage and come up with new and original full sentences. Then you could create a new flashcard programme (which you can sell as a supplement) of advanced flashcards consisting only of these complex new sentences. The important thing is to learn the ability to quickly comprehend a complex thought and try to respond to it. From my point of view it is easy to react to single words and phrases, but the more complex the sentence, the harder it gets to remember the beginning by the time I reach the end — and then to format an adequate
response.
I do not know much about programming, but you have the flashcard template. Surely it would not be too difficult to remove the current content and substitute new original complex sentences which can then be separately sold.
Cheers.
Archie

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Hi Andy: I just came across your recommendation for "Extra" for Spanish. Do you know of a similar site for French? Cheers.Archie

Hi Andy: I just came across your recommendation for "Extra" for Spanish. Do you know of a similar site for French? Cheers.Archie

2 comments
This question is unsolved
Je viens de finir tous les cinq niveaux de Fluenz French. J'ai commence le programme quelques fois mais je ne l'ai jamais fait a la fin avant. My keyboard doesn't allow for accent marks, so I'm switching to English so you won't think I don't know how to spell properly. :-) I've had the program for years and have tried to get through it all a few times, but I never made it past half-way through Level 3. This time I started over with Level 1 in January and committed to doing one level per month. Today, June 12, I finished Level 5! I'm so happy, and I truly appreciate Fluenz - and especially Caroline, who did a wonderful job in the tutorials. I wish you could see the stack of flash cards I made while watching her tutorials. It's 8 inches high! I'll use them over and over to reinforce my learning. Now I know I must do as she says and find other ways to keep advancing my knowledge of French. Movies, a language buddy, Internet news, trips to France and/or Canada? All of the above? Thank you, Fluenz! Thank you, Caroline!!!

Je viens de finir tous les cinq niveaux de Fluenz French. J'ai commence le programme quelques fois mais je ne l'ai jamais fait a la fin avant. My keyboard doesn't allow for accent marks, so I'm switching to English so you won't think I don't know how to spell properly. :-) I've had the program for years and have tried to get through it all a few times, but I never made it past half-way through Level 3. This time I started over with Level 1 in January and committed to doing one level per month. Today, June 12, I finished Level 5! I'm so happy, and I truly appreciate Fluenz - and especially Caroline, who did a wonderful job in the tutorials. I wish you could see the stack of flash cards I made while watching her tutorials. It's 8 inches high! I'll use them over and over to reinforce my learning. Now I know I must do as she says and find other ways to keep advancing my knowledge of French. Movies, a language buddy, Internet news, trips to France and/or Canada? All of the above? Thank you, Fluenz! Thank you, Caroline!!!

7 comments
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As I near the end of Fluenz French 5, I've been thinking about how and where to continue my studies. I wish there was a Fluenz French 6,7,8... but since there isn't, it seems like French Institute Alliance Française (FIAF) might be a good choice. I'm curious if anyone who has gone that route could tell me what level of FIAF classes would someone who has successfully completed Fluenz French 5 be best suited for? All suggestions are welcome. Merci!

As I near the end of Fluenz French 5, I've been thinking about how and where to continue my studies. I wish there was a Fluenz French 6,7,8... but since there isn't, it seems like French Institute Alliance Française (FIAF) might be a good choice. I'm curious if anyone who has gone that route could tell me what level of FIAF classes would someone who has successfully completed Fluenz French 5 be best suited for? All suggestions are welcome. Merci!

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I have a number of French films in DVD and blu-ray formats and I try to set aside time every weekend to watch one of them. But they only give me the option of watching with the English subtitles on or off. What I would really like is the option to watch with English subtitles, French subtitles, or no subtitles at all. Some English language films offer these options, but I really want to find French films with these features. Does anyone know of any?

I have a number of French films in DVD and blu-ray formats and I try to set aside time every weekend to watch one of them. But they only give me the option of watching with the English subtitles on or off. What I would really like is the option to watch with English subtitles, French subtitles, or no subtitles at all. Some English language films offer these options, but I really want to find French films with these features. Does anyone know of any?

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Putting the final touches on the wifi iPad access Fluenz Flashcards--fully optimized for iPad and iPad 2. We'll be posting here as soon as the beta release is ready.

Putting the final touches on the wifi iPad access Fluenz Flashcards--fully optimized for iPad and iPad 2. We'll be posting here as soon as the beta release is ready.

25 comments
This will go great for those of you who are working towards the higher levels of Fluenz French https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EaNqp4FXh-s

This will go great for those of you who are working towards the higher levels of Fluenz French https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EaNqp4FXh-s

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I just ordered French 1-5 today and I am very excited to get started. However, from all my research on the internet I have not been able to pin-down a few things since reviews seem to keep what I am after more general or not even touched on. My idea for using the program is to do one lesson in the morning when all is quiet and I am alone (well, the wife is sleeping). Then repeat that same lesson in the evening with a drill session in the middle of the day from the lesson that I am on. Then, the next day, repeat the previous day, lesson in the morning, drill in the middle of the day, then repeat the lesson again in the evening. This would give me four repeats of each lesson over two days with then each level taking approximately two months, or ten months to complete the whole program. I also plan to pad my listening skills with Netflix shows and movies since many of them have not only multiple languages that you can watch a familiar movie in but also the appropriate subtitles. Even if you are into action style Marvel Universe TV series, such as Jessica Jones or Luke Cage, they have those in 5 different languages! With all that word salad out of the way, last question - is it intent to have high comprehension for each lesson before moving on, or are you supposed to progress through it on a regular schedule and not worry about pieces that you don't remember? I assume with the way that the program appears to be laid out that it is always reaching back to old skills as refreshers while giving you new skills. Any help, tips, or guidance is most appreciated! Michael

I just ordered French 1-5 today and I am very excited to get started. However, from all my research on the internet I have not been able to pin-down a few things since reviews seem to keep what I am after more general or not even touched on.

My idea for using the program is to do one lesson in the morning when all is quiet and I am alone (well, the wife is sleeping). Then repeat that same lesson in the evening with a drill session in the middle of the day from the lesson that I am on.

Then, the next day, repeat the previous day, lesson in the morning, drill in the middle of the day, then repeat the lesson again in the evening.

This would give me four repeats of each lesson over two days with then each level taking approximately two months, or ten months to complete the whole program.

I also plan to pad my listening skills with Netflix shows and movies since many of them have not only multiple languages that you can watch a familiar movie in but also the appropriate subtitles. Even if you are into action style Marvel Universe TV series, such as Jessica Jones or Luke Cage, they have those in 5 different languages!

With all that word salad out of the way, last question - is it intent to have high comprehension for each lesson before moving on, or are you supposed to progress through it on a regular schedule and not worry about pieces that you don't remember? I assume with the way that the program appears to be laid out that it is always reaching back to old skills as refreshers while giving you new skills.

Any help, tips, or guidance is most appreciated!

Michael

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So just how much of how we hear differences in the way that French is pronounced is due to regional accents or just in how an individual might say certain sounds or words? I am watching a few shows on Netflix in French and every now and then one of the actors (well dubbed voice) says something differently that what Fluenz shows as well as multiple youtube videos. The lack of a trilled / throat clearing sounding R is one example. Even on a simple word like "très" the R is extremely soft and barely makes a whimper while other voices nail it. Then I run into the way various programs cover some of the vowel sounds with consistency across resources but then some words come in and violate the pronunciation guides. I cannot tell if this is due to regional differences or the way some individuals speak. A couple of examples - BON (sounds like a nasally BOHN) and Bonne (sounds like BUHN). I also run into people saying the vowel combo AU as more of a an O like in OBEY while someone else, even saying the same word, almost combines O from OBEY with OO from MOO. Could this also come from different speakers pursing their lips more or less than another native speaker? So far, picking up things when the pronunciations vary is not troublesome but I would like to sound like I can speak it properly and not like someone with a slightly off way of speaking or some regional and not common accent taught me to speak. As noted above I use multiple sources for listening practice in addition to Fluenz. I am just not entirely sure on who to try to mirror when speaking. Any tips? Maybe I a different type of media or a specific show or audio book in which the French pronunciations are closer to spot on?

So just how much of how we hear differences in the way that French is pronounced is due to regional accents or just in how an individual might say certain sounds or words?

I am watching a few shows on Netflix in French and every now and then one of the actors (well dubbed voice) says something differently that what Fluenz shows as well as multiple youtube videos. The lack of a trilled / throat clearing sounding R is one example. Even on a simple word like "très" the R is extremely soft and barely makes a whimper while other voices nail it.

Then I run into the way various programs cover some of the vowel sounds with consistency across resources but then some words come in and violate the pronunciation guides. I cannot tell if this is due to regional differences or the way some individuals speak. A couple of examples - BON (sounds like a nasally BOHN) and Bonne (sounds like BUHN). I also run into people saying the vowel combo AU as more of a an O like in OBEY while someone else, even saying the same word, almost combines O from OBEY with OO from MOO. Could this also come from different speakers pursing their lips more or less than another native speaker?

So far, picking up things when the pronunciations vary is not troublesome but I would like to sound like I can speak it properly and not like someone with a slightly off way of speaking or some regional and not common accent taught me to speak. As noted above I use multiple sources for listening practice in addition to Fluenz. I am just not entirely sure on who to try to mirror when speaking.

Any tips? Maybe I a different type of media or a specific show or audio book in which the French pronunciations are closer to spot on?

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The iPad Flashcards are out and Eric did a nice video we've posted on Facebook. As always looking forward to your feedback.

The iPad Flashcards are out and Eric did a nice video we've posted on Facebook. As always looking forward to your feedback.

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