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I am confused with the following sentence. Can anyone explain? "Esa chaqueta es mejor porque es mucho más corta." in this sentence, Mucho is modifying corta, then shouldn't it be "mucha?" or when we modify only adjective, we use masculine form?

I am confused with the following sentence. Can anyone explain?
"Esa chaqueta es mejor porque es mucho más corta."
in this sentence, Mucho is modifying corta, then shouldn't it be "mucha?"
or when we modify only adjective, we use masculine form?

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hirojpla
Fabrice. Now I understood why. Thank you very much!!!

Fabrice. Now I understood why. Thank you very much!!!

Fabrice
See http://gotspanish.com/grammar/adjectives/mucho-and-muy/ In this case it's modifying an adjective, so mucho is an adverb and doesn't change.

See http://gotspanish.com/grammar/adjectives/mucho-and-muy/ In this case it's modifying an adjective, so mucho is an adverb and doesn't change.

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Hello everyone, I am about to finish Spanish Latin America Level 2 and Sonia made a comment at the end one of the lessons about watching a movie called "Volver" with Penelope Cruz. I was wondering if any of you know of some Spanish films or TV Series (with the option of subtitles), that you would recommend watching in the journey of learning Spanish. Thanks!!

Hello everyone,

I am about to finish Spanish Latin America Level 2 and Sonia made a comment at the end one of the lessons about watching a movie called "Volver" with Penelope Cruz. I was wondering if any of you know of some Spanish films or TV Series (with the option of subtitles), that you would recommend watching in the journey of learning Spanish. Thanks!!

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dr.chipcouncil
Under the Same Moon

Under the Same Moon

Priest
I have to pop in here since Spanish films are my specialty. I especially love horror films from Spain, as they tend to be more about suspense and great story telling than gratuitous gore like in the US. Anyway, some of the great films I've seen are: Amores Perros (Drama, Rated R), Cuatro Lunas/Four Moons (Drama), The Devil's Backbone (Horror), The Orphanage (Horror), Desierto (Drama), Y Tu Mama Tambien (Drama), The Motorcycle Diaries (Drama), Pan's Labyrinth (Horror). Also, there's a great collection called Six Films to Keep You Awake. These are horror/suspense and really highlight the amazing storytelling of Spanish directors. Enjoy!

I have to pop in here since Spanish films are my specialty. I especially love horror films from Spain, as they tend to be more about suspense and great story telling than gratuitous gore like in the US. Anyway, some of the great films I've seen are: Amores Perros (Drama, Rated R), Cuatro Lunas/Four Moons (Drama), The Devil's Backbone (Horror), The Orphanage (Horror), Desierto (Drama), Y Tu Mama Tambien (Drama), The Motorcycle Diaries (Drama), Pan's Labyrinth (Horror). Also, there's a great collection called Six Films to Keep You Awake. These are horror/suspense and really highlight the amazing storytelling of Spanish directors. Enjoy!

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If anyone here wants a good TV Show to learn Spanish with, Club de Cuervos is awesome if you have Netflix. It's jointly made between American and Mexican producers/writers and it's pretty hilarious. It is in Spanish with English subtitles. It's humor/material is R rated so I would put the little ones to bed for it. Maturity level what you would expect from an HBO series like Eastbound and Down. That being said, you will learn quite a bit of Spanish probably not covered in Fluenz...:).

If anyone here wants a good TV Show to learn Spanish with, Club de Cuervos is awesome if you have Netflix. It's jointly made between American and Mexican producers/writers and it's pretty hilarious. It is in Spanish with English subtitles. It's humor/material is R rated so I would put the little ones to bed for it. Maturity level what you would expect from an HBO series like Eastbound and Down. That being said, you will learn quite a bit of Spanish probably not covered in Fluenz...:).

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DreadfullyDark
I'm also a big fan of Duenos del Paraiso and the new biographical series about Celia Cruz on Netflix.

I'm also a big fan of Duenos del Paraiso and the new biographical series about Celia Cruz on Netflix.

ladykate
Yes, I found it after hearing Sonia recommend it in one of the lessons. I agree, it is quite interesting. They speak VERY fast and slur words together so subtitles are necessary for me. I usually go through one with English subtitles and then once in Spanish subtitles. And, yes, you will learn a lot ( like a whole lot) of rude language, too. It is quite funny and also has some very touching moments. It looks like it is a hit because they are going for a 4th season and even have a spin-off with the Hugo Sanchez character... which is kinda weird but, hey, if it is as funny as the original I will give it a try. I think it is episode 6 that was the best so far (I am at the end of the first season).

Yes, I found it after hearing Sonia recommend it in one of the lessons. I agree, it is quite interesting. They speak VERY fast and slur words together so subtitles are necessary for me. I usually go through one with English subtitles and then once in Spanish subtitles. And, yes, you will learn a lot ( like a whole lot) of rude language, too. It is quite funny and also has some very touching moments. It looks like it is a hit because they are going for a 4th season and even have a spin-off with the Hugo Sanchez character... which is kinda weird but, hey, if it is as funny as the original I will give it a try. I think it is episode 6 that was the best so far (I am at the end of the first season).

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Please consider this question. We learn very early how to say 'thank you' in Mandarin. Is there an equivalent for 'please?' What is considered proper etiquette when making a request of someone? Thank you.

Please consider this question. We learn very early how to say 'thank you' in Mandarin. Is there an equivalent for 'please?' What is considered proper etiquette when making a request of someone? Thank you.

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Fabrice
In general people do not say "please" like we often do in English. The equivalent would be 请"qǐng" but in the sense of please+do something. For example you get into a restaurant and the owner will say "qǐng zuò", "please sit". Another example: 请你先吃饭 "qǐng nǐ xiān chīfàn", please eat first. Another: 请说一下 "qǐng shuō yíxià", please say something. You cannot use qǐng in a sentence like "I'd like a cup of coffee please". You'd have to say "Please give me a cup of coffee". However, as I said before, people don't say please a lot, unless in a formal situation (customer employee for example). That's why to us people sound rude when we say 我要一杯咖啡 wǒ yào yì bēi kāfēi, I want a cup of coffee, without "please", but it's perfectly normal and not rude in China.

In general people do not say "please" like we often do in English. The equivalent would be 请"qǐng" but in the sense of please+do something. For example you get into a restaurant and the owner will say "qǐng zuò", "please sit". Another example: 请你先吃饭 "qǐng nǐ xiān chīfàn", please eat first. Another: 请说一下 "qǐng shuō yíxià", please say something. You cannot use qǐng in a sentence like "I'd like a cup of coffee please". You'd have to say "Please give me a cup of coffee". However, as I said before, people don't say please a lot, unless in a formal situation (customer employee for example). That's why to us people sound rude when we say 我要一杯咖啡 wǒ yào yì bēi kāfēi, I want a cup of coffee, without "please", but it's perfectly normal and not rude in China.

vivianlotus
I am a native speaker and I think Fabrice explained it very well. Another scenario of using 请 is when asking strangers for information, for example if you ask a stranger on the street for direction, you'd start your question with 请问 (qing wen), 怎么去天安门?(zenme qu tiananmen?)

I am a native speaker and I think Fabrice explained it very well. Another scenario of using 请 is when asking strangers for information, for example if you ask a stranger on the street for direction, you'd start your question with 请问 (qing wen), 怎么去天安门?(zenme qu tiananmen?)

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French 5 Lesson 12 - Pick the right answer has the following: "Ce film est bien, mais l'autre est _______." The correct answer according to the program is "mieux." However, since the words are describing "ce film," a noun, shouldn't the sentence be, "Ce film est bon, mais l'autre est______," and the answer "meilleur?"

French 5 Lesson 12 - Pick the right answer has the following: "Ce film est bien, mais l'autre est _______." The correct answer according to the program is "mieux." However, since the words are describing "ce film," a noun, shouldn't the sentence be, "Ce film est bon, mais l'autre est______," and the answer "meilleur?"

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James Putney
I couldn't find this particular exercise in my version of French, but I do agree with you. I have commented before that Fluenz seems to be cavalier with adjective and adverb forms of good, especially in their English. I suppose the construction they give in the exercise might be correct in French usage, but it is clearly incorrect in English usage, so there should be some explanation.

I couldn't find this particular exercise in my version of French, but I do agree with you. I have commented before that Fluenz seems to be cavalier with adjective and adverb forms of good, especially in their English. I suppose the construction they give in the exercise might be correct in French usage, but it is clearly incorrect in English usage, so there should be some explanation.

Emilie Poyet
You're right Rmattiel: The option shown in the program is fine, however it's a bit informal, it's like an expression, something we'd say between friends: we tend to use "bien" instead of "bon" when speaking. So actually here the version "Ce film est bon, mais l'autre est meilleur" would be more grammatically correct. Thanks for pointing this out, we'll make sure to fix this in our next update.

You're right Rmattiel:
The option shown in the program is fine, however it's a bit informal, it's like an expression, something we'd say between friends: we tend to use "bien" instead of "bon" when speaking. So actually here the version "Ce film est bon, mais l'autre est meilleur" would be more grammatically correct. Thanks for pointing this out, we'll make sure to fix this in our next update.

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je besoin de and je dois pretty much means the same thing so how can you tell which one to use.

je besoin de and je dois pretty much means the same thing so how can you tell which one to use.

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Emilie Poyet
On the one hand, it's true that we have the same difference as in English: Need/Avoir besoin de can be used with nouns (J'ai besoin d'eau/I need water) while must/devoir can't, it's always followed by a verb, as in: Je dois travailler/I must work OR I have to work ("have to" has no equivalent in French, the most common way is to use "devoir". On the other hand, Avoir besoin de/Need can also be used with verbs, as in: J'ai besoin de dormir /I need to sleep. So to sum up I'd say that: Avoir besoin de = To need Devoir = Must/ To have to Hope it clarifies a bit :)

On the one hand, it's true that we have the same difference as in English: Need/Avoir besoin de can be used with nouns (J'ai besoin d'eau/I need water) while must/devoir can't, it's always followed by a verb, as in: Je dois travailler/I must work OR I have to work ("have to" has no equivalent in French, the most common way is to use "devoir".
On the other hand, Avoir besoin de/Need can also be used with verbs, as in: J'ai besoin de dormir /I need to sleep.
So to sum up I'd say that:
Avoir besoin de = To need
Devoir = Must/ To have to
Hope it clarifies a bit :)

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I've noticed in the conversations that the speakers will sometimes add an extra syllable, fairly softly/slightly and pronounced sort of like 'ah', at the end of a phrase or sentence. This is very apparent in Isabella's lines in French 4, Session 20, where she adds an 'ah' at the end of several sentences, adding on to the words 'choses', 'sec', 'valise', and 'gauche'. Simple questions: 1) Why??? 2) How would one know when to do that???

I've noticed in the conversations that the speakers will sometimes add an extra syllable, fairly softly/slightly and pronounced sort of like 'ah', at the end of a phrase or sentence. This is very apparent in Isabella's lines in French 4, Session 20, where she adds an 'ah' at the end of several sentences, adding on to the words 'choses', 'sec', 'valise', and 'gauche'. Simple questions: 1) Why??? 2) How would one know when to do that???

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srfr
Well, where is Caroline (the tutor/moderator) from? She seems to speak the most clearly and without any particular accent - at least, to my ear and my limited knowledge of regional French accents. I hear "Isabella" using the "ah" very often, but never Caroline when she reviews the same conversation in which "Isabella does it repeatedly. All those ah's sound like an affectation to me. Am I wrong about that? Is Caroline's diction what we should be striving for?

Well, where is Caroline (the tutor/moderator) from? She seems to speak the most clearly and without any particular accent - at least, to my ear and my limited knowledge of regional French accents. I hear "Isabella" using the "ah" very often, but never Caroline when she reviews the same conversation in which "Isabella does it repeatedly. All those ah's sound like an affectation to me. Am I wrong about that? Is Caroline's diction what we should be striving for?

Emilie Poyet
Caroline is from Paris, yet she has a very neutral accent and clear pronunciation, so I would recommend to strive for her diction. There are many many regional variants though, like the one you mention from Isabella in level 4. In the South East for example (in Marseille in particular) they tend to add this "ah" sound at the end of many words and sentences. The dialogues will help train your ear to understand people in spite of these variants in real life contexts.

Caroline is from Paris, yet she has a very neutral accent and clear pronunciation, so I would recommend to strive for her diction. There are many many regional variants though, like the one you mention from Isabella in level 4. In the South East for example (in Marseille in particular) they tend to add this "ah" sound at the end of many words and sentences. The dialogues will help train your ear to understand people in spite of these variants in real life contexts.

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Has anyone found a current Spanish Immersion Cruise (or simply a cruise which uses Spanish as the primary language)? I would like to take my wife on one since they usually also speak English and I can practice Spanish and the wife won't feel left out as much. There are some very old versions of this type of cruise on the web but I can't find anything that looks like it is current.

Has anyone found a current Spanish Immersion Cruise (or simply a cruise which uses Spanish as the primary language)? I would like to take my wife on one since they usually also speak English and I can practice Spanish and the wife won't feel left out as much.

There are some very old versions of this type of cruise on the web but I can't find anything that looks like it is current.

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Hey everyone, I just thought I'd share this program with you for those that are interested in learning Spanish. It was developed with Spanish learners in mind so the vocabulary will be a bit easier than other programs and the speed will be a slower too. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dfb9-ZTCA-E .

Hey everyone, I just thought I'd share this program with you for those that are interested in learning Spanish. It was developed with Spanish learners in mind so the vocabulary will be a bit easier than other programs and the speed will be a slower too. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dfb9-ZTCA-E .

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ladykate
Gracias! Muy divertido!

Gracias! Muy divertido!

ladykate
Rossala314 - where did you find the DVD? I checked Amazon and it was not clear if it had Spanish dubbing (and, of course, they have more than one offering).

Rossala314 - where did you find the DVD? I checked Amazon and it was not clear if it had Spanish dubbing (and, of course, they have more than one offering).

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I have Mandarin course. What if I buy Spanish. Do I have choice to select language somewhere in a program?

I have Mandarin course. What if I buy Spanish. Do I have choice to select language somewhere in a program?

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andy@fluenz
Yes, once you purchase and activate Spanish, you can then access both languages from within the same account.

Yes, once you purchase and activate Spanish, you can then access both languages from within the same account.

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