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I just finished the last lesson of level 5. Yay me! It's been a long journey with Sonia...150 lessons, but at the end of the journey I feel like a better member of the human race, with the ability to communicate with so many more fellow residents of planet earth.

I just finished the last lesson of level 5. Yay me! It's been a long journey with Sonia...150 lessons, but at the end of the journey I feel like a better member of the human race, with the ability to communicate with so many more fellow residents of planet earth.

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andy@fluenz
Bravo and congratulations on completing the whole course! All the best with continuing your Spanish!

Bravo and congratulations on completing the whole course! All the best with continuing your Spanish!

Lee R
Congrats.

Congrats.

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Is it OK to say "en frente de" or "delante de"? They seem to be equal expressions. Is there any difference or is it situational?

Is it OK to say "en frente de" or "delante de"? They seem to be equal expressions. Is there any difference or is it situational?

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I am at German Level 2 Session 8. During the last few sessions I have noticed that the German speakers sometimes don't pronounce the -en at the end of some words. In particular this has come up with the words Ihnen, Personen, and einen. This seems to only happen in certain contexts. When I practice speaking I always pronounce these out so that the -en is still heard. Is this pronunciation important? Should I drop the -en sounds when I don't hear it pronounced in the listening exercises? This has brought a little confusion so wanted to ask and clarify. Thanks.

I am at German Level 2 Session 8. During the last few sessions I have noticed that the German speakers sometimes don't pronounce the -en at the end of some words. In particular this has come up with the words Ihnen, Personen, and einen. This seems to only happen in certain contexts. When I practice speaking I always pronounce these out so that the -en is still heard. Is this pronunciation important? Should I drop the -en sounds when I don't hear it pronounced in the listening exercises? This has brought a little confusion so wanted to ask and clarify. Thanks.

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Lee R
I've noticed similar issues with spanish. Makes it a little difficult to follow the native speaker as well as being able to have a conversation with a native speaker. Plus the native speakers sometimes slur 2 words into one. I guess it'll take a lot of time to be able to follow native speakers in both the computer course as well as television, movies, and radio programs.

I've noticed similar issues with spanish. Makes it a little difficult to follow the native speaker as well as being able to have a conversation with a native speaker. Plus the native speakers sometimes slur 2 words into one. I guess it'll take a lot of time to be able to follow native speakers in both the computer course as well as television, movies, and radio programs.

Emilie Poyet
Hi Peter, Andy is right, like in most languages, pronunciation varies across borders and people, which explains these differences. Now in the particular case you're mentioning, my sensation is that when speaking at natural pace or fast pace, German native speakers tend to "swallow" the EN endings, to pronounce it faster, they drop the "E" so sometimes you might just hear a quick final "N" or nothing at all. My advice for you would be to keep pronouncing it though, it is perfectly correct and this way you make sure people will clearly understand you, especially as a beginner. Little by little, with practice, you will reach a more natural pronunciation and accent by imitating more and more, and these little "shortcuts" when speaking come with time, but it's great that you're already able to spot them! tschüss!

Hi Peter, Andy is right, like in most languages, pronunciation varies across borders and people, which explains these differences. Now in the particular case you're mentioning, my sensation is that when speaking at natural pace or fast pace, German native speakers tend to "swallow" the EN endings, to pronounce it faster, they drop the "E" so sometimes you might just hear a quick final "N" or nothing at all. My advice for you would be to keep pronouncing it though, it is perfectly correct and this way you make sure people will clearly understand you, especially as a beginner. Little by little, with practice, you will reach a more natural pronunciation and accent by imitating more and more, and these little "shortcuts" when speaking come with time, but it's great that you're already able to spot them! tschüss!

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In the following sentence from level 4: Me gusta estar allí porque es un buen lugar donde podemos divertirnos. Why is divertimos not just the reflexive infinitive since podemos is already conjugated....we are able to have fun.... podemos divertirnos

In the following sentence from level 4:
Me gusta estar allí porque es un buen lugar donde podemos divertirnos.
Why is divertimos not just the reflexive infinitive since podemos is already conjugated....we are able to have fun.... podemos divertirnos

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Apolonia D.
Hi, reflexive verbs must be conjugated even if they follow another conjugated verb: "Voy a levantarme temprano", "Quiere bañarse en el mar", "Puedes lavarte en el baño".... It's a rule you just have to remember I'm afraid :-)

Hi, reflexive verbs must be conjugated even if they follow another conjugated verb: "Voy a levantarme temprano", "Quiere bañarse en el mar", "Puedes lavarte en el baño".... It's a rule you just have to remember I'm afraid :-)

James Putney
Now I'm confused. It looks to me like the reflexive is NOT conjugated in all the examples you give...? This may be just a semantic point, but I don't think simply adding the pronoun to the end of the infinitive is conjugation?

Now I'm confused. It looks to me like the reflexive is NOT conjugated in all the examples you give...? This may be just a semantic point, but I don't think simply adding the pronoun to the end of the infinitive is conjugation?

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I'm in level 2, lesson 12, and I see the word "prossima" and "prossimo" placed both before and after "settimana" and "mese." This is confusing. Is there a rule that covers how to structure the sentence?

I'm in level 2, lesson 12, and I see the word "prossima" and "prossimo" placed both before and after "settimana" and "mese." This is confusing. Is there a rule that covers how to structure the sentence?

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DennisG
Thanks, Andy. What was most confusing is that when I used it before the noun, and the program expected it to follow the noun, it wouldn't accept my answer. You can see how that would be misleading and baffling.

Thanks, Andy. What was most confusing is that when I used it before the noun, and the program expected it to follow the noun, it wouldn't accept my answer. You can see how that would be misleading and baffling.

andy@fluenz
I understand this can be confusing. Sonia only mentions it in the pronunciation exercises in level 3. Both "prossimo" and "scorso" can be used before or after the noun, they are equally correct and you'll hear both structures. We'll work on making this a bit easier to understand in a future version of the program.

I understand this can be confusing. Sonia only mentions it in the pronunciation exercises in level 3. Both "prossimo" and "scorso" can be used before or after the noun, they are equally correct and you'll hear both structures. We'll work on making this a bit easier to understand in a future version of the program.

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In levels 1 and 2 every so often it is mentioned to check out the resources on the Fluenz Commons. However when I am in the Commons I don't see much here. I put myself within the German language and I see some questions people have posted, there is a general Sonia's Blog, but that is about it. I get a sense from the program that there should be a lot more here that would be helpful. Am I missing something?

In levels 1 and 2 every so often it is mentioned to check out the resources on the Fluenz Commons. However when I am in the Commons I don't see much here. I put myself within the German language and I see some questions people have posted, there is a general Sonia's Blog, but that is about it. I get a sense from the program that there should be a lot more here that would be helpful. Am I missing something?

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peter.kripp
Thanks for the reply. That makes more sense now. I just wanted to make sure I wasn't missing anything. I'll look forward to seeing when the update is ready.

Thanks for the reply. That makes more sense now. I just wanted to make sure I wasn't missing anything. I'll look forward to seeing when the update is ready.

andy@fluenz
Hi Peter, Welcome to Fluenz Commons. The site here is meant to be a way for users to connect to one another and ask language-related questions. We used to have the flashcards and podcasts here, but we've built them directly into the program, so this is what's left now. We're also working on an update to the Commons. All the best with your German!

Hi Peter, Welcome to Fluenz Commons. The site here is meant to be a way for users to connect to one another and ask language-related questions. We used to have the flashcards and podcasts here, but we've built them directly into the program, so this is what's left now. We're also working on an update to the Commons. All the best with your German!

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Unlike Level 1 I am unable to keep track of after which session I should be listening to the next Comprehension track. This was easier to follow in Level 1, but not now in Level 2. Is there a guide somewhere to help? In the first few sessions I have been able to track the Pronunciation tracks, perhaps I need to follow the same patterns for Comprehension?

Unlike Level 1 I am unable to keep track of after which session I should be listening to the next Comprehension track. This was easier to follow in Level 1, but not now in Level 2. Is there a guide somewhere to help? In the first few sessions I have been able to track the Pronunciation tracks, perhaps I need to follow the same patterns for Comprehension?

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peter.kripp
Thank you so much. This is super helpful. Much appreciated.

Thank you so much. This is super helpful. Much appreciated.

Emilie Poyet
Hi peter.kripp, we are actually working on releasing the pronunciation and comprehension scripts for our users, in the meantime, you can use this for level 2: Pronunciation: Track 1: Intro Track 2: sessions 1 to 4 Track 3: sessions 5 to 8 Track 4: sessions 9 to 12 Track 5: sessions 13 to 16 Track 6: sessions 17 to 20 Track 7: sessions 21 to 26 Track 8: sessions 27 to 30 Comprehension: Track 1: sessions 1 to 3 Track 2: sessions 4 to 7 Track 3: sessions 8 to 12 Track 4: sessions 13 to 15 Track 5: sessions 16 to 18 Track 6: sessions 19 to 22 Track 7: sessions 23 to 26 Track 8: sessions 27 to 30

Hi peter.kripp, we are actually working on releasing the pronunciation and comprehension scripts for our users, in the meantime, you can use this for level 2:
Pronunciation:
Track 1: Intro
Track 2: sessions 1 to 4
Track 3: sessions 5 to 8
Track 4: sessions 9 to 12
Track 5: sessions 13 to 16
Track 6: sessions 17 to 20
Track 7: sessions 21 to 26
Track 8: sessions 27 to 30
Comprehension:
Track 1: sessions 1 to 3
Track 2: sessions 4 to 7
Track 3: sessions 8 to 12
Track 4: sessions 13 to 15
Track 5: sessions 16 to 18
Track 6: sessions 19 to 22
Track 7: sessions 23 to 26
Track 8: sessions 27 to 30

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For those of you who find you're getting overwhelmed with certain parts of the German lessons, I just wanted to give you my recent experience and hope it offers you some hope. A couple months ago I "finished" level 2. But at the end, I was still out in the weeds on a few things, mostly the articles. I was getting a lot of the workouts wrong and couldn't figure out why something that was Der and then was Den is now all of a sudden Dem. It just didn't click and I felt that each session was making more clear my ignorance. When I finished level 1, I had a great sense of accomplishment and felt I really understood the material, but not at the end of 2. The holidays were starting to pick up at this time and my free time was becoming less and less. So for about a month, I put it all down. Then I went through all the review sessions in level 1 until I found anything that threw me off. If it did, I rolled back into those sessions until I figured it out and then continued through the reviews. By the time I got to the first review in level 2, I could see that I had to start that level all over. So starting from session 1, I have progressed up to my current session (14). I changed things up. I complete no more than 4 sessions a week and many times only do 3. When I do a new session, I don't progress until I do it twice and am confident that I get all the material. I may repeat one session 3-4 times over a couple days, but I refuse to rush it. I generally take weekends off and absorb what I have learned throughout the week. You know what? It is like a whole different world. I really have grasped a lot of the grammar that bewildered me before. I feel like this is actually starting to really sink in. When I watch German TV, I feel like I am understanding about 25-30% of what they are saying, where I absolutely did not before. BTW, I recommend the Heute app. You can get it on the Amazon fire stick for free. It shows you daily news reports from Germany. So if you feel like you are just not getting it, stop. Back up until you find where it all went wrong and start from there. You won't regret it!

For those of you who find you're getting overwhelmed with certain parts of the German lessons, I just wanted to give you my recent experience and hope it offers you some hope.

A couple months ago I "finished" level 2. But at the end, I was still out in the weeds on a few things, mostly the articles. I was getting a lot of the workouts wrong and couldn't figure out why something that was Der and then was Den is now all of a sudden Dem. It just didn't click and I felt that each session was making more clear my ignorance. When I finished level 1, I had a great sense of accomplishment and felt I really understood the material, but not at the end of 2.

The holidays were starting to pick up at this time and my free time was becoming less and less. So for about a month, I put it all down. Then I went through all the review sessions in level 1 until I found anything that threw me off. If it did, I rolled back into those sessions until I figured it out and then continued through the reviews. By the time I got to the first review in level 2, I could see that I had to start that level all over. So starting from session 1, I have progressed up to my current session (14).

I changed things up. I complete no more than 4 sessions a week and many times only do 3. When I do a new session, I don't progress until I do it twice and am confident that I get all the material. I may repeat one session 3-4 times over a couple days, but I refuse to rush it. I generally take weekends off and absorb what I have learned throughout the week. You know what? It is like a whole different world.

I really have grasped a lot of the grammar that bewildered me before. I feel like this is actually starting to really sink in. When I watch German TV, I feel like I am understanding about 25-30% of what they are saying, where I absolutely did not before. BTW, I recommend the Heute app. You can get it on the Amazon fire stick for free. It shows you daily news reports from Germany.

So if you feel like you are just not getting it, stop. Back up until you find where it all went wrong and start from there. You won't regret it!

2 people find this helpful
Emilie Poyet
Thank you so much for the great advice Jafo, knowing the complexity of German grammar it makes perfect sense! And it also follows Sonia's mantras to the dot: repeat, repeat, repeat + practice, practice, practice: the keys to really improving in any language. Keep it up!

Thank you so much for the great advice Jafo, knowing the complexity of German grammar it makes perfect sense!
And it also follows Sonia's mantras to the dot: repeat, repeat, repeat + practice, practice, practice: the keys to really improving in any language.
Keep it up!

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The sentences throwing off my understanding are: 1) There is a very beautiful plaza next to the hotel. In the lesson, it's "Il y a une place tres belle a cote de l'hotel." Would it be correct to also structure it as "Il y une tres belle place a cote de l'hotel"? 2) We went (there) for work: In the lesson it's "Nous y sommes alles pour le travail.". Would I be correct in saying it this way as well: "Nous sommes y alles pour le travail"?

The sentences throwing off my understanding are:
1) There is a very beautiful plaza next to the hotel. In the lesson, it's "Il y a une place tres belle a cote de l'hotel." Would it be correct to also structure it as "Il y une tres belle place a cote de l'hotel"?

2) We went (there) for work: In the lesson it's "Nous y sommes alles pour le travail.". Would I be correct in saying it this way as well: "Nous sommes y alles pour le travail"?

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Emilie Poyet
Hi tommyzDad, good questions! The placement of adjectives and adverbs is a bit tricky in French, especially since they don't all work the same so we can't just give a simple rule. So here you go: 1) As we said in the tutorials, BAGS adjectives usually go before the noun they describe, yet when they're accompanied by an adverb like "très" or " un peu" for example, it's fine to place them after as well. In general you'll notice that long adjectives tend to go after the noun, but we'll work on it little by little. So the answer is yes, in this case they can either go before or after, both are correct and we've made sure the program accepts both options. *If you wonder, the difference is subtle, placing them after might lay a bit more emphasis onto them that's all 2) The adverb "Y" always goes right before the verb it describes, as in: Nous Y allons pour le travail. So when there are 2 verbs in a phrase it usually goes in-between because it describes the second one, as in: Nous allons Y aller pour le travail. Nous devons Y aller pour le travail (or voulons, pouvons etc) However pay attention in the passé composé there aren't exactly two "verbs", the conjugation is a compound, so être (or avoir) are what we call "auxiliaries", they're part of the verb conjugation in this case, which is why in the passé composé Y always goes before the auxiliary, as in: Nous Y sommes allés pour le travail. Other examples: Nous y avons voyagé en 2012. J'y ai mangé hier. Il y est allé ce matin... Unlike the placement of adjectives, which can be quite complex and has to be practiced until advanced studies, the place of Y is not flexible, so keep these little rules in mind and you'll be fine!

Hi tommyzDad, good questions! The placement of adjectives and adverbs is a bit tricky in French, especially since they don't all work the same so we can't just give a simple rule. So here you go:

1) As we said in the tutorials, BAGS adjectives usually go before the noun they describe, yet when they're accompanied by an adverb like "très" or " un peu" for example, it's fine to place them after as well. In general you'll notice that long adjectives tend to go after the noun, but we'll work on it little by little. So the answer is yes, in this case they can either go before or after, both are correct and we've made sure the program accepts both options.
*If you wonder, the difference is subtle, placing them after might lay a bit more emphasis onto them that's all

2) The adverb "Y" always goes right before the verb it describes, as in:
Nous Y allons pour le travail.
So when there are 2 verbs in a phrase it usually goes in-between because it describes the second one, as in:
Nous allons Y aller pour le travail.
Nous devons Y aller pour le travail (or voulons, pouvons etc)
However pay attention in the passé composé there aren't exactly two "verbs", the conjugation is a compound, so être (or avoir) are what we call "auxiliaries", they're part of the verb conjugation in this case, which is why in the passé composé Y always goes before the auxiliary, as in:
Nous Y sommes allés pour le travail.
Other examples:
Nous y avons voyagé en 2012.
J'y ai mangé hier.
Il y est allé ce matin...

Unlike the placement of adjectives, which can be quite complex and has to be practiced until advanced studies, the place of Y is not flexible, so keep these little rules in mind and you'll be fine!

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Je viens de finir tous les cinq niveaux de Fluenz French. J'ai commence le programme quelques fois mais je ne l'ai jamais fait a la fin avant. My keyboard doesn't allow for accent marks, so I'm switching to English so you won't think I don't know how to spell properly. :-) I've had the program for years and have tried to get through it all a few times, but I never made it past half-way through Level 3. This time I started over with Level 1 in January and committed to doing one level per month. Today, June 12, I finished Level 5! I'm so happy, and I truly appreciate Fluenz - and especially Caroline, who did a wonderful job in the tutorials. I wish you could see the stack of flash cards I made while watching her tutorials. It's 8 inches high! I'll use them over and over to reinforce my learning. Now I know I must do as she says and find other ways to keep advancing my knowledge of French. Movies, a language buddy, Internet news, trips to France and/or Canada? All of the above? Thank you, Fluenz! Thank you, Caroline!!!

Je viens de finir tous les cinq niveaux de Fluenz French. J'ai commence le programme quelques fois mais je ne l'ai jamais fait a la fin avant. My keyboard doesn't allow for accent marks, so I'm switching to English so you won't think I don't know how to spell properly. :-) I've had the program for years and have tried to get through it all a few times, but I never made it past half-way through Level 3. This time I started over with Level 1 in January and committed to doing one level per month. Today, June 12, I finished Level 5! I'm so happy, and I truly appreciate Fluenz - and especially Caroline, who did a wonderful job in the tutorials. I wish you could see the stack of flash cards I made while watching her tutorials. It's 8 inches high! I'll use them over and over to reinforce my learning. Now I know I must do as she says and find other ways to keep advancing my knowledge of French. Movies, a language buddy, Internet news, trips to France and/or Canada? All of the above? Thank you, Fluenz! Thank you, Caroline!!!

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1 person finds this helpful
Emilie Poyet
This session is full of expressions and specific structures, so I think an option would be to leave it out for now and do the next sessions (when you feel ready) until session 16, which is a review of the first half. Then go back to session 13, or even better: revisit the first half of level 4 completely: listen to the conversations and tutorials, and do the flashcards instead of the drills this time.. Since level 4 is quite dense, doing this before moving to the second half can help you make sure you really integrate the material and move forward more confidently into the level. Keep it up!

This session is full of expressions and specific structures, so I think an option would be to leave it out for now and do the next sessions (when you feel ready) until session 16, which is a review of the first half. Then go back to session 13, or even better: revisit the first half of level 4 completely: listen to the conversations and tutorials, and do the flashcards instead of the drills this time.. Since level 4 is quite dense, doing this before moving to the second half can help you make sure you really integrate the material and move forward more confidently into the level. Keep it up!

archiewilkie
Try Yabla. There are 3 minute French videos with subtitles, speed pause repeat controls, and testing after. Different levels as well.

Try Yabla. There are 3 minute French videos with subtitles, speed pause repeat controls, and testing after. Different levels as well.

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